Tag Archives: patterns

Emulate the Romantic Style of William Blake

Emulate the Romantic Style of William BlakeArtists have varying traits and abilities. Still, there are many common threads that tie this community of talented individuals together – one being that artists feel as if they are different. This isn’t too farfetched; artists are often misunderstood by society and even their peers. This story is especially apparent in the life of William Blake.

Regardless of how others viewed him and his art, William Blake’s work has gained notoriety. Unfortunately, Blake died nearly two centuries ago with no money and little recognition.

The interesting life and work of William Blake could be discussed for hours on end. However, this post is meant to recognize his mystical style and some major pieces. For those who want to read more of Blake’s story, visit this link: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=WBL. Also, Segmation is proud to offer 24 digital William Blake patterns. By downloading these paint by number masterpieces, you can emulate one of the most fascinating artists who ever lived.

William Blake’s Style

Romantic. Mystical. Radical. Non-conformist. These words attempt to describe William Blake, but they barely scratch the surface.

Blake lived during the latter half of the 18th century an up to 1827. He was both an artist and poet. During his life, he and his wife worked as engravers to make ends meet.

Today, Blake is recognized as one of the founders of the Romantic Movement. He approached the content of his art as if it all took place in a dream. It seems he was fond of stories from the Bible in addition to great works of literature. In studying his work, it is clear that these characters were alive to him. He paints vivid pictures that could have only been birthed from his imagination.

The Work of William Blake

On the day William Blake died, it is said that he was working on illustrations to go along with Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Before that, at the age of 65 he pursued a project that consisted of 21 copperplate illustrations purposed to breathe life into the Old Testament Bible story of Job.

His life was riddled with disappointment and depression. One story that exemplifies this truth comes from a time he shared an idea with a publisher. He wanted to illustrate Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. The publisher liked the idea but chose to have another artist complete the work. Still, Blake moved forward with creating his own illustrations and planned to sell them at a separate exhibit. Unfortunately, very few people attended the affair and he did not sell a single painting that night.

Despite a life of hardship, William Blake never stopped creating art. Poetry and painting were his passions and engraving was his trade for nearly 50 years.

It can be assumed that Blake had delightful seasons of life, even though they didn’t come in the forms of dollars or fame. Nevertheless, happy stories about William Blake are hard to find these days. Today, William Blake’s joy can only be seen in his paintings.

Enjoy the 24 William Blake Patterns Segmation has for you and continue to learn and celebrate the life of a great artist.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Joseph Mallord William Turner – Great Painter of Light

French Floral and Portrait Painter – Henri Fantin-Latour

Albert Bierstadt: Painter of the American West

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William Glackens – American Realist Painter

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The timeframe in which William Glackens lived was anything but stable. He was born on the swell of the second industrial revolution, was in his adult years during the First World War and died towards the end of the Great Depression. As a career artist, it only seems natural that Glackens would reflect the stark difference each era brought – and he did, but not in the way everyone would think. Even though his stylistic preferences changed, he had a constant presence in the world of fine art, his family, and his circle of friends and colleagues.

Glackens reaped success with three different art styles: illustration, realism and impressionism. His career began in 1891 as an illustrative reporter for Philadelphia newspapers. Eventually, he went to Cuba with the U.S. Army to capture the events of the Spanish-American war. In this span of 7 years, he would travel to Europe, settle in New York and meet the group of men who would play significant roles in his development as an artist.

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“The Eight” was a popular name for the artist clique that Glackens was part of. Led by Robert Henri, The Eight was an organic collection of artists that grew from a casual art community. At start, these broad gatherings hosted artists who would socialize, showcase, and critique one another’s artwork. The title of “The Eight” wasn’t given until later, in 1908, when eight artists, including Henri and Glackens, joined together to display art that was not yet accepted by mainstream society.

Under Henri’s guidance, this group developed into the Ashcan School of American Art. Glackens is considered one of the founders of this movement. He also earned the title of an “Aschan realist.” Different from popular work of the time, this collection of artists “favored cheerful subjects of leisure activities over the dark manner and social realism of others….”

www.segmation.comIn 1904, Glackens personal life flourished too. He married a woman from Connecticut named Edith Dimock. Together, they raised two children in their home in Greenwich Village. Glackens relationship with his family, like his relationship with art, was considered abnormal for bohemian artists of the day, as he was greatly devoted to them. More so, his commitment to his family mirrors his commitment to art; he always remained true to his passions, even as they changed with time.

Shortly after beginning his family, Glackens began adopting stylistic markings that differed from those of the Aschan movement. He started shifting towards mainstream impressionism and incorporating lively colors into his artwork. After moving from using dark-hues for some time, he opened himself to a world of color. According to an admirer of his work, Forbes Watson, this was exactly where Glackens was meant to be. Watson said of his friend, “the color of the world makes him thoroughly happy and to express that happiness in color has become his first and most natural impulse.”

Some would even refer to Glackens as the “American Renoir.” Even though this title bucked against the realist style he strived for when displaying art alongside “The Eight,” he didn’t mind being given the nickname of the French impressionist painter. He is quoted as saying, “Can you think of a better man to follow than Renoir?”

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As Glackens artistic style matured, so did his career. In 1916, he became the president of the Society of Independent artists. He also received awards from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Even as the next generation of artists began to pursue art forms that were abstract and politically charged, his “old-fashioned” artwork continued to offer him stability in life.

On May 22, 1938, Glackens passed away. His death at the age of 68 was sudden. His memory was honored by friends and fans who gathered at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh.

The legacy William Glackens lives on today. He has a strong presence in the Aschan School. In addition, he will always be remembered as one of “The Eight.” Even when his style transformed and strayed from the style of the group, he remained true to his friends, his family and to his calling to art.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art:

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Jules Tavernier: Talent Erupted

Volcano at Night

Volcano at Night

Jules Tavernier was a talented artist and a gifted person. His aptitude for art went far beyond his paintbrush. He had an ability to unite people who shared an affinity towards art. Unfortunately, these relationships would later implode from his alcoholism and rampant debt. The “master of volcano paintings,” as some liked to call him, would erupt just like the natural phenomenon he sought to illustrate. But even in his state of decay, people gathered around him to reflect the truth of his being: he was supremely talented and equally tragic.

In 1844, Jules Tavernier was born in Paris, France. His mother was French and his father was English. He grew up traveling between the two nations but made Paris his home by the time he turned 16, when he decided to study art. At the age of 20 he gained some notoriety when his work was featured at the Paris Salon. Tavernier’s art continued to reach audiences even when he served in the Franco-Prussian War. In addition to being a solider, he was a war correspondent; after capturing the events occurring in Paris, his drawings were sent to London where they would be published.

Wailuku Falls - Hilo

Wailuku Falls – Hilo

His career as a published illustrator continued post war. He became employed by Harper’s Weekly, and in 1872, transferred from London to New York. Tavernier didn’t spend much time on the east coast before heading west on assignment. Two years after landing in America, he arrived in San Francisco. Tavernier found a home on the west coast and would remain there for the rest of his life.

Jules Tavernier was a quick hit among the art community in San Francisco. He made many friends and was one of the original founders of the Bohemian Club. The combination of his talent, behavior and popularity earned him the title, “bohemian of bohemians.” At the same time, he became vice president of San Francisco’s Art Association where it was his job to organize an artist’s union called the Palette Club. Tavernier also opened a studio in a prominent area of San Francisco where artists could gather and collaborate. During this era the artist met his wife, Lizzie Fulton.

In some regards, Tavernier was successful: his artwork was highly sought out and worth a lot of money. He was also deeply disturbed. As his party lifestyle and drinking habits increased, he accumulated debt that ruined a number of his relationships. It got so bad that Tavernier and his wife had to flee to Hawaii where his debtors could not find them.

During his time in Hawaii, Tavernier created nearly 100 oil and pastel paintings inspired by volcanos. His largest work of art was a panorama of a volcano. It was 90 feet long and 12 feet wide. The aim of this painting was to put the viewer at the center of a volcano so he or she could experience the entire circumference of the natural phenomenon.

He built success in Hawaii. Despite only living on the island for five years, many people knew him as the “master of volcano paintings.” Unfortunately, even with the reinstatement of his notoriety, his alcoholism and accumulation of debt resulted in his wife leaving him in 1887.

Despite his poor state, he took on a protégé, David Hitchcock (who later became a well-known comics artist). The Hitchcock family tried to help Tavernier free himself from the bonds of excessive drinking and debt. These efforts were fruitless and Tavernier’s debt got so bad that he was forced to stay on the island of Hawaii.

He died two years later and was buried beneath a tombstone gifted by the artist community he helped found in San Francisco. The Bohemian Club made a statement that poignantly described the life of Jules Tavernier. They wrote, “Of the French artists in California, he was probably the most talented and tragic.”

Jules Tavernier was an artist who could always draw attention to himself and his work. Even when he erupted, he was loved and greatly admired.

Sources:

    Society of California Pioneers Jules Tavernier http://www.opticalspy.com/high-speed-photography-gallery.html.
    Geringer Art Jules Tavernier http://www.geringerart.com/bios/tavernier.html.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art:

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FEATURED ARTIST: OMASTE WITKOWSKI

Beach Stick by Omaste Witkowski

Beach Stick by Omaste Witkowski

“My work varies between painting & photography, and I love working with vivid colors, varied textures and unique compositions.”
-Omaste Witkowski

On Omaste Witkowski’s website owFotoGrafik.com, you will find a large variety of Abstracts, Landscapes, Wildlife, Florals, Antiques, and Architectural Studies. She welcomes the opportunity to discover beauty in every subject she comes across no matter how large or small. When she creates, she is always attempting to make something that is unusual. It is essential to me to display her images as uniquely as she can. To express a moment or object in a new way. To make it her’s and share her vision and imagination. Visit Omaste’s website owFotoGrafik.com to learn more about Omaste and her work, including commissions and prints. Contact Omaste directly at owfotografik@gmail.com.

Stop by SegPlay Mobile on iPhone/iPad and Android to see Omaste Wilowski’s fascinating abstract images of dogs. You’ll enjoy using the imagination that these patterns provide as you color your new canine friends!

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Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

Extracting Art from Science

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Enjoy more from Omaste!

Stare by Omaste Witkowski

Stare by Omaste Witkowski

Grass Walk by Omaste Witkowski

Grass Walk by Omaste Witkowski

Waiting by Omaste Witkowski

Waiting by Omaste Witkowski

Resting by Omaste Witkowski

Resting by Omaste Witkowski

Sunset Pose by Omaste Witkowski

Sunset Pose by Omaste Witkowski

Choosing a Color for Your Business Brand

business,color,brand,blue,choose,customers,pink,colors

Are you searching for a color for your business brand? If so, you are not alone. Small business owners everywhere are thinking about what colors should be representative of their particular business brand. When it comes to business brands, color is extremely important. This is because certain hues can increase positive feelings, whereas other shades can cause a consumer to feel overwhelmed. Read on to find the perfect color for your business brand.

Allow the following color chart to help you decide what shade to choose for your business brand:

— Red — This bold hue increases heart rate and respirations. If you want your business logo/materials to grab customers’ attention, try red.

— Blue — Did you know that “cool blue is perceived as trustworthy, dependable, fiscally responsible and secure”? If you want your business to feel highly professional, opt for blue.

— Green — Do you want to cause your customers to feel relaxed? If so, choose light green. To increase feelings of serenity and health, go for a darker green.

— Pink — Pink is becoming an increasingly popular business brand color. Hot pink is fun and exciting, and may bring a feeling of youthfulness to customers. Light pink is romantic, and “dusty pinks appear sentimental.”

Many small business owners opt for more than one color for a business brand. Here are a few color combinations that are both professional and lovely:

— Tan, brown and light blue

— Cream, black and gold

— Mocha and sage

Business owners often incorporate the color of a brand into their offices/headquarters. This makes the color they choose even more important, since their employees and customers will be seeing it regularly. Some work atmospheres will need to be soothing, whereas others should be more exhilarating. Cool colors, such as blues and greens, are notorious for relaxing the mind and body. Conversely, bold colors, such as red, may have the capacity to energize employees and customers.

What color is your business brand? Why did you choose that particular color? Share with Segmation by commenting on this blog post today.

Sources:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/175428

http://www.ehow.com/way_5163092_business-decorating-ideas.html

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William Merritt Chase – American Impressionist Painter

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American Impressionist painter William Merritt Chase was born on November 1, 1849, in Williamsburg, Indiana.

His parents had six other children after his birth. William’s father, a businessman, decided to re-locate his family to Indianapolis in 1861, when Chase was twelve. In Indianapolis, the young man was hired by his father to be a salesman.

www.segmation.comChase’s artistic talent was not necessarily nurtured in his childhood. He received early training from Jacob Cox and Baton S. Hays, artists who were self-taught. Though Chase had very humble beginnings, studying under non-notable teachers, he would mature to become a famous impressionist painter.

William Merritt Chase joined the army only to be encouraged by his teachers to seek further artistic training. He received this advice, and in 1869 moved to New York to study with Joseph Oriel Eaton. Soon after, he began studying at the National Academy of Design. Lemuel Wilmarth, pupil of Jean-Léon Gérôme, taught Chase during his time at the National Academy.

Although he grew rapidly under the tutelage of excellent art instructors at the National Academy of Design, Chase moved to St. Louis in 1870 to help support his financially struggling family. He did this by selling still life paintings. While in St. Louis, he was involved in the local art community. He won prizes and awards for the excellence of his works. The time spent in St. Louis was something of a springboard for Chase’s career, as it gave him an opportunity to exhibit his works and showcase his rare talent.

Chase’s artistic talent was evident to all, including the elite and upper class of St. Louis. These wealthy individuals favored Chase and provided a way for him to live in Europe for two years. Their only stipulation was that he would provide them with paintings and assist them in obtaining the European art they desired for their collections.

www.segmation.comThe burgeoning artist’s two years in Europe were excellent for his stylistic development. He enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and was privileged to be a student of Karl von Piloty and Alexander von Wagner. During his time in Munich, Chase sought out friendships with other American artists, including Joseph Frank Currier, Frank Duveneck, and Walter Shirlaw.

While in Munich, William Merritt Chase began to experiment with his artistic style. He painted figurative works in the “loosely-brushed style popular with his instructors.” His painting titled “Keying Up” is an example of his work from this time period (1876). Chase was later awarded a medal for “Keying Up” by the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition.WMC001thumb

In 1878 Chase moved to New York and began teaching art. A few years later, in 1886, he married Alice Gerson, whom he had eight children with. Alice, along with two of Chase’s daughters, frequently posed for him.

William Merritt Chase established and instructed at the Shennecock Hills Summer School in 1890. It was at this school, located in New York, that he taught the “plein air method of painting” (meaning he taught his students out of doors). The Chase School of Art was opened in 1896.

His ability to excellently paint many different subjects was one of the defining talents of Chase, the artist. Throughout his life he regularly painted portraits, landscapes, studio interiors, figures, cityscapes, and still life pictures.

On October 25, 1915, the world lost a painter who had contributed much to society. William Merritt Chase passed away in his Town House in New York. He died a well-respected, highly esteemed artist and teacher.
Chase’s New York studio and home (now known as the William Merritt Chase Homestead) are both part of the National Register of Historic Places. Chase is an example of an artist who worked with integrity and relentlessly developed his talent. He is still celebrated to this day.

William Merritt Chase established a school for artists known as the Chase School. He played various roles in his life including an artist, teacher, father, and sophisticated cosmopolitan. Although he worked with all media, he was most talented in oil painting and pastel, as well as watercolor.

He is best known for his portraits, who sitters included important people of the day and also his family members. Locations including Prospect Park, Central Park in New York City, and Shinnecock Hills on Long Island were popular locations for his outdoor paintings.

Patterns includes several self portraits, and numerous portraits including Portrait of a Lady, lady in Pink, Lady in Black, The Blue Kimono, Girl in Red Embroided Jacket, The Mandolin Player, Still Life Fish, At the Seaside, Azaleas, Girl in Japanese Costume, Portrait of Miss Dora Wheeler, and Portrait of Louis Betts.

Do you have a favorite Impressionist Painter? If you could paint an impressionist painting, what color would you choose? Share with Segmation by leaving a comment below.

Sources:

http://www.nga.gov/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Merritt_Chase

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Coming soon: If you love art as well as technology, you won’t want to miss our upcoming blog post about word cloud portraits.

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Beautiful Moonglow

Moonglow

Moonglow

 

Pattern Set for SegPlayPC released (see more details here)

The moon’s surface has been studied by telescope since Galileo first observed it in 1609 and firsthand by a total of 12 U.S. astronauts during the six successful lunar landing missions of the US Apollo program. The Moon’s small size and low mean density result in surface gravity that is too low to hold a permanent atmosphere, and therefore it was to be expected that lunar surface characteristics would be very different from those of Earth. The moon is the most ‘human’ of the heavenly bodies, since its phases and the shadows on its surface give it a face, encouraging the popular lore about the ‘Man in the Moon’.

Because the moon rotates in step with the Earth, we can only see about 59% of the moon’s surface. The dark and featureless plains we see on the near side of the moon are called maria, a Latin term for seas.

Bram Stoker who’s 165th birthday is November 8, 2012 also enjoyed Moon!

In our set of Moonglow patterns we showcase photographed images of landscapes, which are lit or dominated with the visible moon. In some patterns, the moon is depicted by itself, while in others, the moon is shown reflecting over calm waters, lighthouses, beaches, bare trees, cloudy skies, rocky coastlines, wheat fields, and mountain ranges.

This set contains 21 paintable patterns.

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