Tag Archives: pink

Blue is for Boys, Pink is for Girls

Blue is for Boys and Pink is for GirlsMany expecting parents are going with a new trend; they are painting nurseries neutral colors. Are people trying to get away from common childhood stereotypes? Whoever said blue is for boys and pink is for girls?

Even though it is true today, color has not always perceived this way. Before the middle of the 20th century, children were not assigned gender specific colors. In fact, there is a lot of debate about the masculinity of the color pink; how some of the world’s most honorable men wore dresses; and what colors really attribute to males and females.

Is the pendulum swinging back to center? Are neutral-colored parents taking a stance against societal norms? Or is this saying true: blue is for boys and pink is for girls?

The Masculine Color Pink

Pink can be seen in the men’s sections of most clothing stores – even if it is not always referred to as pink. Some men opt to call it, “salmon.” Regardless of title, the point is this: a lot of men look good in this color.

Back in the day, pink was not seen as a “dainty” color or overly feminine, as it is today. Actually, during World War II this color was used in military combat – and there is nothing feminine about war.  At one point, the British painted an entire militia of warships pink. They thought this hue would blend in at dusk. The tactic was used to confuse the Germans. Did it work?

Honorable Men Wore Dresses

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt was two and a half years old, he was pictured wearing a long white dress with shiny black shoes and long curly hair. His mother was not mistaken about his gender – this look was appropriate for boys in the late 19th century. In fact, during this era, it was appropriate for boys to wear dresses until the age of seven. White cotton dresses went well with white cloth diapers. They were functional and easy to clean.

Who’s Whose Color?

It was not until the middle of the 1900’s that blue and pink were attributed to boys and girls. Even then, it was said that pink was for boys and blue was for girls. This was stated in an article printed in the trade publication, Earnshaw’s Infants’ Department, in June of 1918.  

All this changed, however, in the 1940’s. After World War II, boys began dressing like their fathers, and girls like their mothers.

Gender specific colors go to show how inseparable colors are to the human psyche. Much of a person’s identity comes from the apparel he or she dons. Many children learn about their genders by the colors they wear and play with. But will blue always be for boys? And will pink forever be a girl’s color? Or will the pendulum swing again?

Image Credit: JEONGMEE YOON / BARCROFT

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Choosing a Color for Your Business Brand

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Are you searching for a color for your business brand? If so, you are not alone. Small business owners everywhere are thinking about what colors should be representative of their particular business brand. When it comes to business brands, color is extremely important. This is because certain hues can increase positive feelings, whereas other shades can cause a consumer to feel overwhelmed. Read on to find the perfect color for your business brand.

Allow the following color chart to help you decide what shade to choose for your business brand:

— Red — This bold hue increases heart rate and respirations. If you want your business logo/materials to grab customers’ attention, try red.

— Blue — Did you know that “cool blue is perceived as trustworthy, dependable, fiscally responsible and secure”? If you want your business to feel highly professional, opt for blue.

— Green — Do you want to cause your customers to feel relaxed? If so, choose light green. To increase feelings of serenity and health, go for a darker green.

— Pink — Pink is becoming an increasingly popular business brand color. Hot pink is fun and exciting, and may bring a feeling of youthfulness to customers. Light pink is romantic, and “dusty pinks appear sentimental.”

Many small business owners opt for more than one color for a business brand. Here are a few color combinations that are both professional and lovely:

— Tan, brown and light blue

— Cream, black and gold

— Mocha and sage

Business owners often incorporate the color of a brand into their offices/headquarters. This makes the color they choose even more important, since their employees and customers will be seeing it regularly. Some work atmospheres will need to be soothing, whereas others should be more exhilarating. Cool colors, such as blues and greens, are notorious for relaxing the mind and body. Conversely, bold colors, such as red, may have the capacity to energize employees and customers.

What color is your business brand? Why did you choose that particular color? Share with Segmation by commenting on this blog post today.

Sources:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/175428

http://www.ehow.com/way_5163092_business-decorating-ideas.html

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Company Uses Color to Create a Sense of Identity

The way color affects individuals is simply remarkable. Different tones can create moods, evoke emotions, and make statements. Brides understand this and often choose their wedding shades prior to making any other plans. Art therapists understand the power of color and utilize it for healing purposes. Also, nothing is as effective at setting an ambiance than color. It’s undeniable that shades and tones are forces to be reckoned with.

For J Public Relations, color has created a sense of identity as a company. JPR, a firm whose specialty is “eateries” and hotels, is truly unlike any professional office you have ever encountered. This is because it is bathed in pink. Pink walls and light fixtures, and even pink accessories and graphics grace the offices of J Public Relations. JPR’s kitchen even boasts this happy shade. This has many people asking one simple question: why pink?

Jamie Sigler Pescatello and Kim Julin Guyader, founders J Public Relations, were the brains behind the pink offices located in New York City. They chose the shade first because they favored it, and second because they believed it would make the firm distinct from competitors. Pescatello and Guyader also found the color to be “playful and powerful,” and thought it represented the firm’s personality.

When Pescatello and Guyader first visited their current office space they were less than impressed. In fact, they were downright frightened by the 3,300 square feet that used to be a law firm. The peeling wallpaper and dark color scheme of the offices almost scared the founders of JPR away, but over time they became convinced that they could create the work space they imagined. A few knocked-down walls and buckets of pink paint later, J Public Relations had offices that continue to inspire creativity in its 24 staff members (who are, by the way, all female, “though unintentionally”).

It turns out that the founders of J Public Relations had a brilliant idea when they dreamed of pink. The lovely color that has come to define JPR has attracted interviewers and is inspiring articles and blog posts. The office space of J Public Relations is an example of the amazing ability color has to create and cement a sense of identity.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/22/pink-pays-dividends-pr-office/

Note: all pictures were found on J Public Relations’ website (http://www.jpublicrelations.com/expertise/ and http://theofficestylist.com/j-public-relations/)

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