Tag Archives: artists

Art Created in Confinement

Art created in confinement may be the most beautiful art of all. Why? Because this type of art comes from a place of utter vulnerability and realness. Those who are confined have been stripped of many freedoms and consequently have emotions that are also stripped and raw. This is why the art that is created from this frame of mind is nothing short of amazing.

Holocaust Victims Prove Art Is Worth Dying For

The Holocaust Period was perhaps the greatest era in history in which art was created in confinement. Individuals held in concentration camps were not just confined; they were also brutally tortured. But the incredible fact is, these individuals managed to find whatever makeshift art supplies they could to craft magnificent drawings and paintings.

Yad Vashem, the World Center for Holocaust Research, is located near Jerusalem, Israel. Amongst its many galleries and displays is an art museum that will take your breath away. This art museum features walls and walls of drawings and paintings that were created by artists held in death camps. These works of art, some gruesome, some hopeful, give us an inside look at the emotions Holocaust victims experienced. At the same time, the pieces remind us of the inherent ability we as humans have to look within ourselves and draw out passion and beauty in the most hideous circumstances.

Author Julia Cameron says in her book The Artist’s Way, “(Creating) art always gives us the ability to move out of the victim position…Holocaust victims scratched butterflies on the walls of concentration camps. That assertive creative act spoke plainly: ‘You cannot kill my spirit.’ At its core, art is triumphant.”

Creating Art in Confinement Confirms the Value of Art

When individuals who are in confinement create art, the sheer value of art itself is displayed. For example, it was very dangerous during the Holocaust to create art, but death camp detainees created it anyway, even in the face of losing their lives as a result. Why would anyone risk his or her life for art? Perhaps because art has the ability to keep the human spirit alive. This ability makes art intrinsically valuable.

Art Helps Jailed Juveniles Find Purpose

Art created in confinement is not unique to the past. A recent article published by http://www.wishtv.com tells us that currently jailed juveniles are utilizing art for self-expression. Not just that, creating art is helping these juveniles find purpose for their lives.

Reportedly, youths held in the Marion County Jail were caught with what the aforementioned article referred to as “artistic contraband”: art supplies. Instead of punishing these youths, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office decided to team up with the Indianapolis Art Center to allow dozens of juveniles to take part in a program geared toward teaching visual literacy and art skills, as well as building confidence and empathy. The art skills that are being taught to youths held in the Marion County Jail are proving to have a positive effect on these young people’s lives.

How Has Making Art Helped You?

Has there ever been a time in which art was a lifesaver for you? Perhaps you went through a traumatic event and turned to art in order to maintain your hope and sanity. If you’ve had an experience like this, or have created art in confinement, we would love for you to share a comment with us.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Possibly the Rarest Art Form – Forensic Art

American Flag Trivia – Happy Fourth of July!

Easiest Art Heist in Paris

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Advertisements

Art Transforms Traditional Business Practices

2b Art Transforms Boring Business PracticesCreativity is finally being rewarded in the way (starving) artists have long deserved. Financially.

Graphic designers, bloggers, painters, crafters, photographers and others are making money by pursuing their passions. Thanks to websites that empower artists to market, sell and manage their artwork, art is becoming profitable business. Even more astounding is the fact that businesses are also profiting from art.

Here are three examples of traditional business practices being refreshed by the presence and power of art:

Art Transforms Life Insurance

Life insurance is a touchy subject. People don’t often get excited about policies that payout when they cease to exist. Nevertheless, life insurance is an important policy to hold. More so, it is a business that stands the test of time. However, Beagle Street, a life insurance company in the UK recognizes the need to breathe new life into this longstanding insurance practice. This is why they contract artists to create original artwork for them.2a Art Transforms Boring Business Practices

The artwork is not for their office walls or holiday greeting cards; the art is for their insurance policies. Each one of their client’s is given a printout of his or her policy, covered with a piece of original artwork. Not only does the colorful cover remind people to “Enjoy Life,” it also helps them find their life insurance policies – among a drab sea of white papers and black text – when the time is right.

Art Transforms Business Cards

What do Cisco, Intel, and Hubspot have in common? Aside from being some of the most recognizable names in business they share similar wall art. Each company has commissioned artwork from gapingvoid. Founded by a cartoonist, gapingvoid exists to “affect change in business and business culture.” And gapingvoid offers more than interior décor; it also transforms traditional, run-of-the-mill business cards.

Art Transforms Board Rooms                                         

2c Art Transforms Boring Business PracticesAttending a board meeting can be downright boring. But not for ABGC Architecture and Design. The design firm commissioned 22,742 LEGO bricks to create the board room table that sits in the office of a Dublin ad agency.

Art is breathing new life into traditional business practices. If conference room tables can be made of LEGOs, cartoons can be drawn on business cards and a life insurance policy can be as beautiful as life itself, then it seems art can transform any business.

What business should implement art next? And, what art practice has the potential to become the next big business?

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Choosing a Color for Your Business Brand

Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

Use Color to Change Employees’ Job Performance

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Vision Problems Guide Artists

By looking at his paintings, you probably never guessed that Edgar Degard could not see well. However, the French realist painter was believed to have a congenital retinal problem. Similarly, Mary Cassatt and Claude Monet both had cataracts, which explain why the artists had trouble differentiating color later in life. And sketch artist Charles Méryon never toyed with color because he was well aware of his color-blindness.

Several artists have suffered from eye problems that pose obstacles to their chosen career paths. However, many artists leveraged their disabilities, using them as tools to guide their distinct style and career.

For instance, Peter Milton was diagnosed with color-blindness in 1962. This occurred after he spent years painting, teaching art, and studying under the master of color, Josef Albers. Upon receiving his diagnosis, Milton abandoned color; instead, he committed himself to the creation of black and white masterpieces. The absence of color did not void other creative elements of his artwork, though. Milton produced intricate works of art that are best described as “visual puzzles in which past and present seem to merge.”

Milton found a way to work around his eye problems while other artists did not. It has been reported that one in 10 men has color-blindness. A professor of ophthalmology at Stanford University, Michael Marmor, recognizes the challenge artists face when diagnosed with vision troubles. He tells NPR that “most artists who found out they were colorblind just switched to printmaking or sculpture.”

Some artists worked through their eye problems to create the art they loved and were known for. Claude Monet was quoted as saying, “At first I tried to be stubborn. How many times … have I stayed for hours under the harshest sun sitting on my campstool, in the shade of my parasol, forcing myself to resume my interrupted task and recapture the freshness that had disappeared from my palette! Wasted efforts.”

Throughout history, several artists approached vision troubles differently. Some worked through them, others looked past them, and many worked around their eye problems. Milton, who is a shining example of how to work around color-blindness, attributes his artistic style to his disability. “… It helps to have a disability,” he told NPR, “because when you can do anything, which of all the things you can do are you gonna choose? So something has to help you make the choice.”

Some of the world’s most well-known artwork has been produced by artists with vision problems. The pieces may seem to use askew color options or be void of color entirely, but to us, these color choices make the artwork appear distinct. And who knows, perhaps an artist accepted his or her disability and set out to create art in this authentic way.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

EnChroma Introduces Colorblind People to Color

The Gift of Color Vision

The Importance of Color Vision and Art

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Is a Career in Art for you?

 

Is a Career in Art for you? http://www.segmation.wordpress.com

What do you want to be when you grow up? Many kids are asked this question. At the start of a school year, when optimism is fresh and hopes are high, children set goals and claim their dream jobs. This doesn’t pertain exclusively to children though; many adults reflect on their childhood dreams as well. Like young souls, adults can also be found wondering and exploring what it takes to pursue a career in art.

      • Did you dream about becoming an artist?
      • Do you support your child’s dreams of having a career in art?

When a child’s artwork decorates a refrigerator, it is hard to imagine how carefree creativity will earn him or her a comfortable living. All too often, many parents believe artistic endeavors only lead to poor career paths. However, there are plenty of stable, high earning jobs– like architecture, interior design, and graphic design – that require creativity and artistic talent.

Architecture

Curious children love to build and create. They are fascinated by how items work and fit together. If a child is inclined to building creative pieces of artwork, architecture may be a great career to pursue. Support this natural talent by giving him or her toys like Legos, clay, and miniature models.

Interior Design

Interior design may be a future career for a child who has a knack for arranging colors, is fascinated by textures, and comes up with unique art combinations. It requires these interests and is necessary in many different forms. There are competitive careers in home décor, office design, bathroom remodeling, and more.

Graphic Designer

Growing up in a technological world may raise a generation of children who use visual designs to communicate. Graphic design is used to sell products, inform the public, and inspire viewers. Many fields require artistic talent for graphic design. This is a great career because there are many ways to make money.

It is never too early to prepare for the future. Supporting a child’s artistic dreams may encourage the little one to thrive in academic studies and extracurricular activities. It may also infuse a parent’s life with revived passion. For anyone feeling this urge, know that it is never too late (or too early) to pursue a career in art.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Fresh Art:

Welcome Spring with a Freshly Painted Front Door

The Color Green: Many Shades, Many Meanings

Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Honoré Daumier – The Poor Man Whose Art Lives Today

www.segmation.com
The early 1800s marked a time of significant change throughout France. The post French Revolution era came on the heels of the Industrial Revolution. At this time, political institutions and society at large were learning how to operate in a new age of evolved capabilities and lofty dreams, as well as an increased number of working poor and social upheaval. Art seemed to be the only answer to the twisted combination of confusion and excitement that plagued the century.

An artist who attempted to bring humor to the uncertainty was Honoré Daumier. Daumier was a versatile artist; he published political caricatures, made his living selling lithographs, and received praise for his impressionist paintings and life-like sculptures. Still, Daumier only experienced a small taste of success in his life. His talent was overshadowed by a greater need to earn money and stay true to his political convictions.

In 1808, Honoré Daumier was born in Marseille, France. After attempting to make his living as a poet, Honoré Daumier’s father, who moved his family to Paris in pursuit of fame and fortune, was financially broke. As a result, around 12 or 13 years of age, the soon to be artist dropped out of school and took employment at a bailiff’s office. He continued in the ways of proper employment as a bookseller’s clerk in the busy Palais-Royal area of Paris where he observed the differences of the people passing by the gardens. Inspired by their uniqueness, Daumier wanted to depict them with his art.

www.segmation.com

Daumier, at an age younger than 20, began learning about lithography. This became a useful skill that would provide him with income throughout his life. Yet, his artistic passion yearned to be able to express the people and social situations he took in each day. While he wanted to be artistic in ways of painting and sculpture, much of his time was dedicated to print-making.

Finally, in 1830, Daumier got some notoriety, as he began leveraging his marketable skills to produce caricatures for satirical publications. At this time, print publications attracted the attention of every person, from the king to a pauper. In 1832, King Louis-Philippe was disheartened by the anti-government cartoon, Gargantua, created by Daumier. The artist was sentenced to prison, and then a mental institution. This was the worst retribution the king demanded for an offending artist.

His imprisonment for this caricature marked the end of his punishments, but it did not stop him from publishing pieces of political satire. In fact, between the years 1830 and 1847 he specialized in producing lithography, cartoons, and sculptures. While he continued to work in these areas as a way of self-expression and to secure income, in 1848 there was a distinct shift in Daumier’s career. From 1848 to 1871 he thrived in an art form and style he was passionate about: impressionist painting. One reason for this change may have been the death of his 2 year old son. He and his beloved wife, Léopoldine or “Didine” suffered this loss around the time Daumier altered his artistic focus.

Honoré Daumier developed a number of talents within the sphere of art throughout his life. The context of his paintings also broadened. As he began pursuing naturalism, he depicted historical themes that highlighted the greatness of nature above men. In addition, he also used literary themes, and remained true to the subjects whom inspired him most—everyday Parisians. He felt as if true life provoked conversation about social topics of the day.

Although Daumier never made a commercial success of his art during his lifetime, he was appreciated by many. Those include: Eugene Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. In face Corot when Daumier was destitute and without shelter, bought him a cottage.

Towards the end of his life, Daumier dedicated much of his time to sculptures and paintings. His work was considered “ahead of its time” by modern critics who did not come to fully appreciate his work until after his death. In 1879, Honoré Daumier passed away. He was near blind and in debt at the time. It is rumored he was buried in a pauper’s grave. If his life’s work in caricatures indicates anything, it is that he wouldn’t have cared; he lived life depicting the poor, living among them, and dying their death as well. As a result, his art lives on today.

Sources:
http://www.artble.com/artists/honore_daumier
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/152400/Honore-Daumier#toc1720
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/daumier/

Can you relate to being an artist that is currently having small successes in life?

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

— Use Color to Change Employees’ Job Performance

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/use-color-to-change-employees-job-performance/

— Frans Hals — Dutch Portrait Painter

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/frans-hals-dutch-portrait-painter/

— Gerard ter Borch’s Art Elevated Him to Nobility

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/15/gerard-ter-borchs-art-elevated-him-to-nobility/
Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

www.segmation.com

Joseph Mallord William Turner – Great Painter of Light

www.segmation.com

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775 – 1851) was a controversial English landscape painter. Joseph Mallord William Turner, better known as J.M.W. Turner, was born on April 23, 1775, in Covent Garden, London, England. His eccentric style matched his subjects – shipwrecks, fires, natural catastrophes, as well as natural phenomena such as sunlight, storms, rain, and fog.

Although renowned for his oil paintings, Turner is also one of the greatest masters of British watercolour landscape painting. He is commonly known as “the painter of light” and his work is regarded as a Romantic preface to Impressionism. Turner was considered a controversial figure in his day, but is now regarded as the artist who elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivalling history painting.www.segmation.com

The significance of light to Turner resembled God’s spirit. In his later paintings he concentrated on the play of light on water and the radiances of skies and fires, almost to an Impressionistic style. Segmation’s collection of Joseph Mallord William Turner patterns includes many examples of his style including The Fighting Temeraire, The Shipwreck of the Minotaur, Snow Storm, The Grand Canal, Peace – Burial at Sea, and Rain, Steam and Speed.

This Segmation set contains 25 paintable patterns.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._M._W._Turner

Joseph Mallord William Turner

If you liked this Segmation blog post, we know you’ll enjoy:

— Color Can Help You Understand Personality Types

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/color-can-help-you-understand-personality-types/

— Make Artist Famous with Hole-Punch Portraits

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/make-artist-famous-with-hole-punch-portraits/

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Joseph Mallord William Turner from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

Segmation Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC released (see more details here)

www.segmation.com

The Natural Side of Art

When most people think of art, the first thing that might come to their mind is an easel, oil paints, brushes, and watercolors. Or perhaps an individual’s thoughts might immediately conjure images of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night, or Degas’ ethereal paintings of ballerinas. These works are certainly exquisite examples of fine art. But art is inclusive of these “traditional” works and so much more. Organic art is part of that “more.”

Organic art is somewhat of a movement that is beginning to make waves in the art world. Organic (or as one particular artist puts it, “eco-friendly”) art is inclusive of art pieces that have been created with organic materials, such as dried leaves and flowers, twigs, plants, tree bark, and other natural elements. Organic artists often use a canvas made out of processed tree bark and will glue elements to the canvas using organic glue. Some artists do not use paint, even if it is naturally derived, to color their creations. Rather, they use dried flowers and leaves to create the effects they desire.

Artists are choosing to embrace organic art for reasons that are both moral and preferential. Some are truly against any type of waste, and therefore reject traditional art supplies. Such artists wish to use only materials that are readily available from the earth and would have gone to waste had they not been used for artistic purposes. Other artists simply love nature and find it a privilege to use its offerings to compose their pieces with.

In your opinion, what is art? Is it only paintings and drawings that have a certain amount of prestige, or can it be creations crafted with totally natural elements? Many people seem to believe that art can be highly refined as well as rugged and earthy. This principle bleeds over into other art forms, such as music, dance, writing, and the like. Organic art is convincing people that the term “art” is more expansive and inclusive that they ever thought possible.

http://www.redbubble.com/groups/uncommon-supports-to-paint-on/forums/14208/topics/287961-the-uspo-july-how-to-basant-soni-art-on-natural-bark-of-palm-tree

Note: Images represented in this post do not belong to Segmation; they were found at http://www.redbubble.com/groups/uncommon-supports-to-paint-on/forums/14208/topics/287961-the-uspo-july-how-to-basant-soni-art-on-natural-bark-of-palm-tree and http://www.etsy.com/listing/95693579/fine-art-giclee-print-on-canvas-image-03

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com