Category Archives: Color psychology

Why Is Your Favorite Color Your Favorite Color?

Psychology of Color - Segmation Digital Art GameYou probably have a favorite color, but chances are you rarely stop to think about why you are drawn to this particular hue.

For years, psychologists have been claiming that people are drawn to choice shades for particular reasons. This means that, whether you know it or not, there is good reason why your favorite color is your favorite color.

What is Your Favorite Color?

It is likely that your preference stems from personal tastes and the culture that surrounds you. After all, we develop color affinities at young ages. For instance, to make conversation with a child, it is common to ask, “What is your favorite color?” Therefore, it makes sense to think that these hues have an influence on our personalities as we age too. According to some psychologists and color experts, our favorite colors reflect parts of our personalities, but how?

One artist who correlates colors with personality traits is Oliver Munday. His color maps recently made their way into a highly anticipated book on color, ROY G. BIV: An Exceedingly Surprising Book About Color (Bloomsbury 2013).

Color Maps of Your Favorite Colors

The color maps explore long held truths about colors as well as historical events and phenomenon related to specific colors. Like, did you know the yellow pencil can be traced back to Ch’ing dynasty in China? At the time, yellow was the “exclusive imperial color for the country” (Huffingtonpost.com).

Take a look at Munday’s color map of black. “Miserable Ecstasy” and “The Vast and The Minute” it says in bold. Nobody needs to ask why these sayings are associated with the shade because they make perfect sense. As the color map enfolds them into historical events and phenomenon, like “The curious science of ink” and “Glossy vs. matte blacks,” readers begin to learn facts about their favorite color and become enlightened as to why they prefer certain shades.

Emotional Connections to Color

To some, it is fascinating to learn that the reason our favorite colors are our favorite colors are rooted in history. However, most of us understand that there are emotional reasons why we connect with certain shades. Empower-Yourself-With-Color-Psychology.com lays out what your favorite color says about you on an emotional level. Click on the link to find out what your favorite hue reveals.

If you’ve never stopped to think about why your favorite color is your favorite color, take time to explore this thought today. Use the resources and links provided in this post to identify the historical significance and emotional ties you have to your choice hue.

We live in a colorful world. Learning about your favorite color may enlighten you.

Read more Segmation blog posts about color psychology:

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You Are What You Wear

You Are What You WearColor is both symbolic and persuasive. For instance, red means stop. It also arouses feelings of excitement. Have you ever been at a red light and seen a McDonalds sign? At that moment, did you start craving an ice cream cone, french fries, or a hamburger? This occurrence seems all too common.

Color, Psychology, and Marketing

Companies use color in powerful ways. Branding is an art, not an afterthought. It is also an area of study. Companies use color psychology to better understand how they ought to sell products, promote services, and represent their purposes. After understanding the impact colors have on people’s psyches, companies use this information to decide on what logos, websites, and uniforms they will use.

UniFirst Corp is a company that provides specialized uniforms to companies throughout the United States and Canada. The director of marketing claims that “Utilizing the psychology of colors can help reinforce a sought after business image or message…”. He goes onto say that consumers may connect more with a company’s uniform choice than its logo because a uniform is “… being worn by a real person, someone who embodies that brand and makes the brand more tangible to them.”

Effective Uniform Colors

According to UniFirst, the colors below have common perceptions and are often worn by people in certain roles.

White: pure and clean (worn by doctors and nurses to imply sterility)

Black: power and authority (helps project knowledgeable expertise)

Green: calming and growth and fertility (favored by landscapers/garden centers)

Purple: royal and dignified (helps suggest “premium” products and services)

Orange: warm and vibrant (used to create a playful business environment)

Silver: prestige and scientific (often the choice of high-tech companies)

Red: excitement and confidence (tends to be used to distinguish employees in expansive business settings)

Blue: Trust and belonging (the most popular color used in all businesses)

Yellow: Warmth and happiness (used to promote a general sense of well-being)

Gold: Elite and prestigious (fosters a sense of the very best)

Another color that needs to be mentioned is brown. Brown relays a sense of reliability. And who knows this better than a little company called UPS? Their uniforms are easy to recognize and symbolize their reliable services and on time deliveries.

When employees wear colourful uniforms, they embody the missions of their companies.

If you don the apparel of your employer, get to know what their colors mean. Knowing the meaning behind these colors may help to boost your confidence and make you proud of the brand you represent.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Business Branding:

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The Color Red and its Many Meanings

Stop and think about the color red.

… Get it? Stop and think. The color red conveys different meanings throughout the world. In North America, the color red is used for stop lights and stop signs. It also serves this purpose in other nations in addition to representing personal emotions.

According to incredibleart.org red also represents “Excitement, energy, passion, love, desire, speed, strength, power, heat, aggression, danger, fire, blood, war, violence, and all things intense and passionate.” In Eastern cultures, red indicates happiness.

Red comes in all shapes and sizes, but these meanings are rather consistent. Lately, however, red is a color of contradiction.

Red, a Color of Contradiction

The journal Appetite recently issued a new study that arrived at a simple conclusion: “the color red reduces consumption.” But don’t be quick to add “appetite suppressant” to its list of traits. For years, branding experts have been saying that red stimulates hunger. Karen Haller is a color and branding expert who confirms this by saying, “red triggers stimulation, appetite, hunger, and it attracts attention.”

It is no secret that people are drawn to the color red, after all, red lipstick, cocktail dresses, and roses are thought to be very alluring. How can it encourage one’s appetite while decreasing consumption?

Cognitive psychology researcher and author of the new study Nicola Bruno seeks to answer this question. She evaluates the consumption of 240 volunteers given popcorn, chocolate, or hand cream on different colored plates.

The CNN article covering this topic states, “On average, people ate less popcorn and chocolate when they were served on red plates compared to blue or white plates.” But this is not exclusive to food. “Moisturizing cream followed a similar trend. When testing hand cream on red plates, people used about half as much, on average, compared to cream on blue or white plates.”

Oliver Genschow, who studies consumer psychology at the University of Mannheim, agrees that “the study supports the idea that red reduces consumption.” However, the research only goes so far as to say this is a “subconscious” phenomenon. Should people know red decreases consumption, eating from red plates may not help them. Considering branding experts are convinced red triggers hunger, it is probably best to stop… and think about what’s on the plate.

Image made available by  luizfilipe on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Color Psychology:

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There is more to Color than meets the Eye

There is more to Color than meets the EyeWhat is better than taking in a beautiful array of color? This can happen in a natural setting, where autumn leaves are turning crisp and ocean waves rush to make whitecaps. It can also occur in an art gallery, where wall hangings mesmerize art enthusiasts, encouraging them to stop and be still.

These are examples of times when people give color their full attention. In most instances, however, color is taken for granted. People go days and even weeks without taking in the vibrancy surrounding life. How can this be? Color is everywhere.

The Complexity of Color

One possible reason people let the miracle of color pass them by is because it is so complex. Sadly, some will never truly understand how involved and deliberate color is. On the other hand, many people cannot contain their fascination; these tend to be those who dedicate their lives to pursuing the intricacies of color. A woman who does this is Jude Stewart. She is the author of Roy G. Biv – An Exceedingly Surprising Book about Color. In this book, the designer explores how there is more to color than meets the eye.

Roy G. Biv

For some time, people have been trying to fit color into the box of human understanding. This may be the reason behind the pressure that was put on Issac Newton to claim there were seven colors in a rainbow – not six.

He decreed red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet as a rainbow’s colors. Taking the first letter of each color creates the acronym Roy G. Biv. Without indigo (the color that he rushed to fit in) this helpful memorization technique could not exist.

Color is Cultural and Universal

Color exists beyond human understanding and advances human understanding at the same time. This is why people groups use color to set themselves apart. Despite efforts to be distinct, color also brings the world together.

In Roy G. Biv, Stewart explains how the concept of color differs between cultures. Across the world, people attach various meanings to colors. For instance, in Japan green is called blue. But color also has a way of bringing the world together. One example of the universality of color is how speakers of different languages list colors in a similar sequence. The widely accepted order goes black, white, red, green, yellow, blue, brown.

Ultimately, color is an earthly phenomenon that may never be totally understood. But people like Jude Stewart are going to continue trying to make sense of it all. If for nothing else, than to encourage people to stop, be still, and take in the world around them.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art and Color:

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The World’s Favorite Color

The World’s Favorite Color 1People love to travel both near and far. They enjoy taking in new scenes, exploring diverse cultures, eating eccentric food, and more. Visiting different places throughout the world adds richness to life and makes one fact clear: it is impossible to escape color.  Then again, who would want to?

Every country has unique colors that travelers seek and citizens delight in. Plush green hills line Germany. Vibrant reds decorate China. Blue waters surround Greece. White sands dust the United States.

With an endless array of varying shades, it is hard to list the world’s color preferences. Still, every person has an answer to the question, “What is your favorite color.” Therefore, is it too much to ask, “What is the world’s favorite color?”

The Question

Three global marketing firms didn’t think so. Once posed with this question, they set out to find an answer. Cheskin, MSI-ITM, and CMCD/Visual Symbols Library conducted a survey that determined BLUE is the world’s favorite color.

The Answer

In the global study, 17 different countries were polled. Roughly 40 percent of the survey participants listed blue as their favorite color. Perhaps this has to do with the impact blue has on emotions; blues are often associated with tranquility. Varying shades of the color cause people to feel at peace. Blue is also the color most often associated with nature (blue sky, blue water). Could this be a factor why people everywhere share the same favorite color?

Other Findings

  • Purple came in a distant second as the world’s favorite color with only 14 percent popularity.
  • The world’s least favorite color is white.
  • Other non-related studies show people are more productive when they are surrounded by blue.

Is your favorite color blue? Why? If not, what is your favorite color?

Why do you think blue is favored among the rest of the colors throughout the world and in many cultures?

Also, Segmation is interested to know, what is the most colorful destination you’ve experienced? Share your story by leaving us a comment below or sign onto the Segmation facebook page to upload a picture.

Isn’t it a joy to live in this colorful world?

Read more Segmation blog posts about Favorite Colors Around the World:

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Prison Pink

Prison PinkWhat do you associate with the color pink? Love? Romance? Valentine’s Day hearts and flowers? Cotton candy or a baby blanket?

Truth be told, pink represents many pleasant aspects of life.

What if this color was used to encourage happy emotions and combat negative ones?

This is the thought behind a color psychology experiment being implemented in some correctional facilities. In other words, prison walls are being painted pink.

Why Are Prisons Pink?

Several prisons are curious about the affects pink has on inmates. Adding a colorful approach to drab décor, wardens and sheriffs hope to minimize aggressive behavior. One sheriff who overseas a detention center in Buffalo, Missouri says, “Pink is a non-aggressive color.”

Many color experts would agree, saying some shades of pink are believed to have calming effects on emotions. In theory, pink should act as an energy zapper, hopefully putting a stop to conflict before it starts.

What is the Shade of Prison Pink?

The popular prison hue is known as “Drunk-tank Pink.” The official title is Baker-Miller Pink (R:255, G:145, B:175).

Choosing the right shade of pink is important for this color experiment. As one color psychologist points out, “Not all pinks are created equal.” There is some debate over whether or not pink has calming properties. More research still needs to be done on which pinks prove to have soothing effects in intense environments.

Does Prison Pink Work?

Another argument surfacing about the power of pink is how long feelings of relaxation last. Some sources say the positive sensation will only last for a short period of time. It is speculated that within 15-30 minutes of exposure, the body will return to aggressive instincts.

Others believe that it is physically impossible to feel uneasy in a pink environment. One biosocial researcher claims, “The heart muscles can’t race fast enough,” in this type of setting.

Will this technique work? Can the color pink limit violent and aggressive behavior in inmates?

Pink may not create a utopian society within prison walls, but many facilities are willing to test the theory.

How does color effects your emotions. Have you noticed calming effects when in pink environments?

Read more Segmation blog posts about Color Therapy:

Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

The Psychology of Color

Colors Change What is Beautiful

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Choosing a Color for Your Business Brand

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Are you searching for a color for your business brand? If so, you are not alone. Small business owners everywhere are thinking about what colors should be representative of their particular business brand. When it comes to business brands, color is extremely important. This is because certain hues can increase positive feelings, whereas other shades can cause a consumer to feel overwhelmed. Read on to find the perfect color for your business brand.

Allow the following color chart to help you decide what shade to choose for your business brand:

— Red — This bold hue increases heart rate and respirations. If you want your business logo/materials to grab customers’ attention, try red.

— Blue — Did you know that “cool blue is perceived as trustworthy, dependable, fiscally responsible and secure”? If you want your business to feel highly professional, opt for blue.

— Green — Do you want to cause your customers to feel relaxed? If so, choose light green. To increase feelings of serenity and health, go for a darker green.

— Pink — Pink is becoming an increasingly popular business brand color. Hot pink is fun and exciting, and may bring a feeling of youthfulness to customers. Light pink is romantic, and “dusty pinks appear sentimental.”

Many small business owners opt for more than one color for a business brand. Here are a few color combinations that are both professional and lovely:

— Tan, brown and light blue

— Cream, black and gold

— Mocha and sage

Business owners often incorporate the color of a brand into their offices/headquarters. This makes the color they choose even more important, since their employees and customers will be seeing it regularly. Some work atmospheres will need to be soothing, whereas others should be more exhilarating. Cool colors, such as blues and greens, are notorious for relaxing the mind and body. Conversely, bold colors, such as red, may have the capacity to energize employees and customers.

What color is your business brand? Why did you choose that particular color? Share with Segmation by commenting on this blog post today.

Sources:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/175428

http://www.ehow.com/way_5163092_business-decorating-ideas.html

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Decorate Your Home Office to Inspire Creativity

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The past few years have been tough on the economy as well as on individual incomes. Because of the unstable job market, more and more people these days are turning to self-employment. Being your own boss and setting your own hours are not the only perks that come with being self-employed — having and decorating a home office is equally fun and rewarding. Your home office should inspire peace and tranquility, but should also be a place where creativity abounds. Does your home office need a makeover?

Did you know that you can decorate your home office to inspire creativity? It’s true. Consider the following color chart to decide what shades to paint and accessorize your office with:

Cools — If your job requires a great deal of mental clarity, try painting your office walls a cool shade. Blue should especially foster concentration. Sage is cool in hue as well as trendy, and would be a great choice for someone who desires a fashionable haven of clarity.

Earth tones — Do you need a sense of calm in your home office? How about an increased sense of organization? Consider an earth tone. Examples include white, deep grey, and hot chocolate. Earth-toned walls lend themselves perfectly to bright and cheery accessories (pillows, chairs, pictures, etc.).

Upbeat shades — Does your job require you to be constantly upbeat and in a good mood? If yes, an energizing shade would be best for your home office. Red is the definitive bold color that is known for getting blood pumping. You might also want to consider unusual color combinations, such as raspberry and turquoise or lemon and robin’s egg blue. office,home,color,consider,creativity,earth,job,amazing

It’s amazing the impact color can have on a room, and the effect a well-decorated home office can have on a person’s creativity and efficiency. If you’ve had trouble coming up with fresh ideas and innovations, consider making over your home office. You never know what impressive results will follow.

How is your home office decorated? Has it inspired creative ideas in you? Share with us by commenting on this Segmation blog post.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com/custompublishing/decorating-advice/chishop-picking-a-home-office-wall-color-20120323,0,3881708.story

http://colorchats.benjaminmoore.com/2012/04/the-best-colors-for-a-home-office/

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Use Color to Change Employees’ Job Performance

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Color can affect emotions.  

Color is a powerful thing. In fact, it has the ability to affect individuals’ emotions. Certain colors encourage specific types of behavior in people — nowhere is this more clearly demonstrated than in the workplace. What color have you chosen to decorate your office in? The hue that you surround your employees with may be affecting their job performance more than you know.

What colors enhance job performance?

Here are just a few examples of workplace paint shades that have powerful effects upon employees:

— Red — Most people know that red is a stimulating, empowering color that can increase workplace excitement. This is because the color red “can increase brain wave activities, as well as raise heart rates and respiration.” It would be best to accent a workplace with red, as an entirely red office space might be overwhelming to employees. If your workers need a boost of invigoration, red would be an ideal shade to utilize.

— Orange and Yellow — Did you know that orange is capable of increasing enthusiasm? It’s true. Yellow, another warm hue, can actually “stimulate memories” and make individuals feel a sense of welcome. These colors are best used as accents. Why? Because yellow has the potential to bring out frustration and anger, and orange may increase a person’s appetite.

— Blue and Green — Do your employees need a boost of hope and encouragement? If so, green or blue would be the perfect shades to implement in your office space. For high-stress environments, blue should be used because of its amazing ability to lower heart rates, respiration, and blood pressure. Green, which has been known to reduce anxiety, is another great choice for stress-provoking places of employment.

Color can help your employees in a number of ways. 

It’s clear that color can be helpful to individuals on many levels. Whether your employees would benefit from an atmosphere of peace, hope, inspiration, or determination, you can help them get their emotional needs met simply by investing in a new paint job for your office. Color truly is amazing!

Sources:

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/wall-color-effect-employees-17469.html

Coming soon: Do you work from home? If yes, learn to decorate your home office to foster personal inspiration by reading our next post.

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