Category Archives: Art Gallery

There is more to Color than meets the Eye

There is more to Color than meets the EyeWhat is better than taking in a beautiful array of color? This can happen in a natural setting, where autumn leaves are turning crisp and ocean waves rush to make whitecaps. It can also occur in an art gallery, where wall hangings mesmerize art enthusiasts, encouraging them to stop and be still.

These are examples of times when people give color their full attention. In most instances, however, color is taken for granted. People go days and even weeks without taking in the vibrancy surrounding life. How can this be? Color is everywhere.

The Complexity of Color

One possible reason people let the miracle of color pass them by is because it is so complex. Sadly, some will never truly understand how involved and deliberate color is. On the other hand, many people cannot contain their fascination; these tend to be those who dedicate their lives to pursuing the intricacies of color. A woman who does this is Jude Stewart. She is the author of Roy G. Biv – An Exceedingly Surprising Book about Color. In this book, the designer explores how there is more to color than meets the eye.

Roy G. Biv

For some time, people have been trying to fit color into the box of human understanding. This may be the reason behind the pressure that was put on Issac Newton to claim there were seven colors in a rainbow – not six.

He decreed red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet as a rainbow’s colors. Taking the first letter of each color creates the acronym Roy G. Biv. Without indigo (the color that he rushed to fit in) this helpful memorization technique could not exist.

Color is Cultural and Universal

Color exists beyond human understanding and advances human understanding at the same time. This is why people groups use color to set themselves apart. Despite efforts to be distinct, color also brings the world together.

In Roy G. Biv, Stewart explains how the concept of color differs between cultures. Across the world, people attach various meanings to colors. For instance, in Japan green is called blue. But color also has a way of bringing the world together. One example of the universality of color is how speakers of different languages list colors in a similar sequence. The widely accepted order goes black, white, red, green, yellow, blue, brown.

Ultimately, color is an earthly phenomenon that may never be totally understood. But people like Jude Stewart are going to continue trying to make sense of it all. If for nothing else, than to encourage people to stop, be still, and take in the world around them.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art and Color:

The Most Colorful Cities In The World

The World’s Favorite Color

Pursuing a Career in Art

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Thomas Kinkade Is Remembered Through His Artwork

Thomas Kinkade’s death on April 6th of 2012 came as a shock to both the art community and the public at large. Kinkade, known as “The Painter of Light,” was made famous by his works of art. His prints were wildly popular and sold millions. This is proven by the reported fact that 1 in 20 Americans has a Kinkade print in their home. Without a doubt, Thomas Kinkade was, and remains, a celebrated artist.

Though Kinkade is no longer with us, his art remains. His last work (from what is currently known) was shown in Cape May, New Jersey, at the Victorian Walk Gallery in August of 2012. The piece, “Away From It All,” displays a cottage in the woods, a crescent moon, and, of course, emanates painted light.

The Victorian Walk Gallery displayed “Away From It All” during “The Thomas Kinkade Legacy Celebration.” Patrick, Kinkade’s brother, gave a presentation about the painting at its showing. 3,000 people arrived at the Victorian Walk Gallery just three hours after the exhibit opened.

Some of the art world has in general never “taken” to Kinkade’s artwork. Although he has sold millions of dollars worth of prints, paintings, and merchandise, the topic of Kinkade’s art remains heated and controversial. Still, Thomas Kinkade received art training at the Art Center College of Design located in Pasadena. He also studied at the University of California at Berkeley. Kinkade was raised in Placerville, California.

Thomas Kinkade is well known for painting soft, lush, idyllic scenes. He often depicted streams, lovely homes, and nature settings. His passion for creating paintings that evoked emotions of peace is made evident by the artwork he crafted. The “light” that he is so noted for painting is the thread of continuity that runs throughout all his works.

Of his own work, the painter was reported to have said, “If people look at my work and are reminded of the way things once were or perhaps the way they could be, then I’ve done my job.” Kinkade’s family members and artwork will undoubtedly cause him to be remembered for generations to come.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/20/thomas-kinkades-last-know_n_1811090.html

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/04/07/artist-thomas-kinkade-dies-in-california-at-age-54/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2126413/Thomas-Kinkade-dead-Millionaire-painter-light-dies-aged-54.html

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Color Unconventional Schemes in Art

Artists have the ability to tap into the power of colors when they create a piece of art. Color plays a strong role in the way a work of art is perceived and experienced by the viewer. Certain colors can raise spirits while others can dampen moods. Some colors can invigorate and enliven while others can put people to sleep. How can artists use the power of colors to their advantage?

When you stand before your easel and blank canvas, you have a choice between using conventional colors in your painting to represent visible reality, or using unconventional color schemes to portray a subjective or internal reality. Conventional color schemes make sense if your objective is to accurately and faithfully paint the landscape or still life in front of you. However, if you choose an unconventional color scheme for your art, you have the opportunity to be expressive with your artwork. You can conjure emotions and elicit certain reactions from the viewer.

In the portrait painting by Picasso titled “Tete de Femme”, most of her flesh is a pasty white color, instead of the usual pinkish beige color of natural skin tones. Blue and light green brushstrokes form shadows on the face, while light red is used sparingly to create various accents.
Picasso continues the blue theme throughout the artwork, painting a blue background that gradually shifts from pale blue to dark blue. He also mixes blue with the black of the figure’s hair. The predominance of blue in its many variations is one of the distinguishing features of this artwork. A painting such as this uses color creatively and purposefully to evoke an emotional response from the viewer.

The next time you make a painting, pay careful attention to the colors that you use. Consider how different color choices will affect the final painting and try to imagine the kind of impact that those colors will have on people who view your painting.

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Tips for Buying Art at Auction

Anyone who’s ever visited a gallery knows how expensive it can be to purchase original art. Fortunately, there is a more economical alternative for fine art lovers who are on a budget. At an art auction, it’s possible to find a piece you love at an amazing bargain. Below are a few quick tips to ensure that your first auction is a smooth, successful experience:

  • Know which type of auction you’re attending. There are three main categories. Estate auctions (an upscale version of a “moving sale”) are held when a family or heir needs to liquidate everything in the house, regardless of price. Consignment auctions are usually held at an auctioneer house, with most sellers setting minimum reserves to ensure that their pieces don’t sell too cheaply. Mixed auctions are a combination of the two.
  • To find an auction, enter your location and “art auction” into a search engine. You can also check the newspaper and try calling antique dealers and auctioneer houses directly.
  • Once you’ve found an auction, call to make sure the location and time is accurate. Also find out when the preview period starts — this allows you to come a few hours (or sometimes days) early and get a look at the items that will be up for bidding.
  • When registering to bid, find out if the auction house adds a premium to your bids. In some cases, this can increase the total selling amount by 10% or more. Also find out what form of payment they accept.
  • At the auction, choose your seat carefully. Sitting toward the front will give you a close view of the items, but sitting or standing in the back will let you see who else is bidding on an item. Always have a maximum bid in mind for items you’re interested in. Resist the temptation to exceed it, especially in the heat of the moment during the bidding process.
  • Listen carefully to the auctioneer’s descriptions of items. Also pay attention to the conversations going on around you, as this may help you determine the value and authenticity of a piece of art. Write down the selling prices so you can review them later and recognize trends.
  • After winning a piece of art, be sure to get a receipt after the auction is over. If it’s high in value, you might also consider insuring the item.

If you do your research and resist getting carried away, an auction can be a fun and cost-effective way to enhance your art collection.
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Outside the Lines: Art Trivia Segmation

The Expressive Vincent van Gogh

The Expressive Vincent van Gogh

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(1) Which Painter was a laborer in the Panama Canal?
(a) Vincent Van Gogh
(b) Charles Laval
(c) Paul Gaugin
(d) Emile Bernard

 
(2) English artist Andy Brown created a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by stitching what together?
(a) Old napkins
(b) 1,000 used tea bags
(c) Strands of colored yarn
(d) Scraps of paper

 
(3) Which country published the first illustrated children’s book in 1658?
(a) France
(b) England
(c) Japan
(d) Germany

 
(4) What was the building that is now famously known as the Louvre Museum and Art Gallery used for in 1190?
(a) A fortress
(b) A library
(c) A Justice Building
(d) A prison

 
(5) Whose painting, titled Impressions Sunrise, gave the Impressionistic style its name?
(a) Eugene Delacroix
(b) Edouard Manet
(c) Gustave Courbet
(d) Claude Monet

Answers found at the end.

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Answers: (1) c) Paul Gaugin (2) b) 1,000 used tea bags (3) d) Germany (4) a) A fortress (5) d) Claude Monet