Tag Archives: relaxing

The Accomplished Artist – Benozzo Gozzoli

promo1Benozzo Gozzoli was an Italian painter in the early part of the Renaissance era. He was an accomplished artist with dozens of paintings, frescos, and murals to his name. Today, people remember Gozzoli for his work. Even though his style is not as distinct as other artists of his time, he was able to create a multitude of pieces, many of which attract audiences to this day.

Some sources say Gozzoli was born in 1420, although there is some debate about the exact year and birthplace. There is not a lot written about the personal life of Gozzoli. During his youthful years, however, he could be found in Florence, Italy.

The Accomplished Artist – Benozzo Gozzoli
However, this post is meant to recognize his artist style and some major pieces. For those who want to read more of Gozzoli’s story, visit this link:  For those who want to read more of Gozzoli’s story, visit this link: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=GOZ. Also, Segmation is proud to offer 27 digital Benozzo Gozzoli patterns. By downloading these paint by number masterpieces, you can emulate one of the most fascinating artists who ever lived.

In his twenties, he transitioned to Rome where he started his career as an artist by apprenticing with Fra Angelico. He worked alongside Angelico for many years and spent a good amount of time painting the Dominican monastery of San Marco. When this project was complete, Gozzoli began work with Lorenzo Ghiberti.

Gozzoli’s style was greatly impacted by the decade he spent as an apprentice. He learned many traits from Ghiberti and Angelico. For instance, his aptitude to tell a story through his paintings by using vivid illustrations and fine details was a sign of Ghiberti. Angelico’s influence shown in Gozzoli’s use of brilliant colors.

However, like a good pupil, Gozzoli took these influences and developed his own personal style. Many critiques will make the point that Gozzoli’s work was not as strong as other artists of his time. But he had a great way of bringing paintings to life by portraying settings and people that were full of life and color. This was especially true when his subject matter was lighthearted.

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While not always seen as original, Gozzoli set himself apart from his contemporaries in more ways than one. Even though he was not known for his attention to detail (in fact, many pieces of his work can be found with errors), he did enjoy embellishing landscapes with animals and birds. Also Gozzoli’s tireless efforts cannot be denied. The sheer number of paintings he produced prove he was one of the most accomplished artists of the Italian Renaissance.

His paintings are too many to list. Throughout the course of his career, he was responsible for creating nearly 145 different scenes. A number of his art pieces can be visited today, as he had the privilege of painting the interiors of many historic locations.

The Lateran Museum now holds his Madonna and Child with Saints and Angels, which he painted in the monastery of S. Fortunato in 1449. Some of Gozzoli’s landmark paintings include the Medici-Riccardi Palace. In 1459 he completed Journey of the Magi to Bethlehem, a fresco in the chapel. Then in 1463 he worked at San Gimignano to create 17 different scenes from the life of St. Augustine. One of his greatest commissions took place in Campo Santo, a cemetery in Pisa. There, he completed 25 frescoes inspired by Old Testament Bible stories.

The latest artwork attributed to Gozzoli (for certain) was dated 1485. He died in 1497. Some sources say he was buried in the monastery of San Domenico in Pistoria. Others claim his final resting place was Campo Santo, Pisa. With more than 500 years separating Gozzoli and modern day, it is easy to think of him as a mysterious man. But it’s hard to imagine him that way in his own time. He painted his way through Italy and it can be assumed that he was seen then, as he is now, as an accomplished artist.
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Enjoy the 27 Benozzo Gozzoli Patterns Segmation has for you and continue to learn and celebrate the life of a great artist.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Emulate the Romantic Style of William Blake

Joseph Mallord William Turner – Great Painter of Light

French Floral and Portrait Painter – Henri Fantin-Latour

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William Glackens – American Realist Painter

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The timeframe in which William Glackens lived was anything but stable. He was born on the swell of the second industrial revolution, was in his adult years during the First World War and died towards the end of the Great Depression. As a career artist, it only seems natural that Glackens would reflect the stark difference each era brought – and he did, but not in the way everyone would think. Even though his stylistic preferences changed, he had a constant presence in the world of fine art, his family, and his circle of friends and colleagues.

Glackens reaped success with three different art styles: illustration, realism and impressionism. His career began in 1891 as an illustrative reporter for Philadelphia newspapers. Eventually, he went to Cuba with the U.S. Army to capture the events of the Spanish-American war. In this span of 7 years, he would travel to Europe, settle in New York and meet the group of men who would play significant roles in his development as an artist.

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“The Eight” was a popular name for the artist clique that Glackens was part of. Led by Robert Henri, The Eight was an organic collection of artists that grew from a casual art community. At start, these broad gatherings hosted artists who would socialize, showcase, and critique one another’s artwork. The title of “The Eight” wasn’t given until later, in 1908, when eight artists, including Henri and Glackens, joined together to display art that was not yet accepted by mainstream society.

Under Henri’s guidance, this group developed into the Ashcan School of American Art. Glackens is considered one of the founders of this movement. He also earned the title of an “Aschan realist.” Different from popular work of the time, this collection of artists “favored cheerful subjects of leisure activities over the dark manner and social realism of others….”

www.segmation.comIn 1904, Glackens personal life flourished too. He married a woman from Connecticut named Edith Dimock. Together, they raised two children in their home in Greenwich Village. Glackens relationship with his family, like his relationship with art, was considered abnormal for bohemian artists of the day, as he was greatly devoted to them. More so, his commitment to his family mirrors his commitment to art; he always remained true to his passions, even as they changed with time.

Shortly after beginning his family, Glackens began adopting stylistic markings that differed from those of the Aschan movement. He started shifting towards mainstream impressionism and incorporating lively colors into his artwork. After moving from using dark-hues for some time, he opened himself to a world of color. According to an admirer of his work, Forbes Watson, this was exactly where Glackens was meant to be. Watson said of his friend, “the color of the world makes him thoroughly happy and to express that happiness in color has become his first and most natural impulse.”

Some would even refer to Glackens as the “American Renoir.” Even though this title bucked against the realist style he strived for when displaying art alongside “The Eight,” he didn’t mind being given the nickname of the French impressionist painter. He is quoted as saying, “Can you think of a better man to follow than Renoir?”

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As Glackens artistic style matured, so did his career. In 1916, he became the president of the Society of Independent artists. He also received awards from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Even as the next generation of artists began to pursue art forms that were abstract and politically charged, his “old-fashioned” artwork continued to offer him stability in life.

On May 22, 1938, Glackens passed away. His death at the age of 68 was sudden. His memory was honored by friends and fans who gathered at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh.

The legacy William Glackens lives on today. He has a strong presence in the Aschan School. In addition, he will always be remembered as one of “The Eight.” Even when his style transformed and strayed from the style of the group, he remained true to his friends, his family and to his calling to art.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art:

Joshua Reynolds – English Portrait Painter

Jules Tavernier: Talent Erupted

Marketing Art in the Digital World: An Introduction

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Turrell does it right with Light Creates Space, Color, Perception and Art

www.segmation.comThe unique art of James Turrell infuses space with light. The artist makes entire rooms, museums, and even craters his canvases by transforming large areas into viewing experiences that manipulate how observers perceive their environments when natural and artificial lights alternate.

Turrell has been experimenting with light since 1966. He seems to be fascinated by the way light impacts how an individual understands space, perception, and even color. In relation, the American artist says this about the miraculous correlation:

“We teach the color wheel, but we really should speak about the light frequencies of each eye, and then the context of vision in which they reach the eye, because that’s how we perceive.”

This post explores James Turrell’s approach to art by briefly exploring how light manipulates space, how light changes perception, and the necessary relationship between light and art. At the conclusion, there are resources to inspire further exploration into this intricate subject.

Light Manipulates Space

Most people understand that light affects the way we see color and perceive the world around us. But is it comprehensible that light can manipulate space regardless of physical material? Turrell sets out to prove that a limited and definite space can be created without manmade parameters, like those set up with wood beams, steel rods, or concrete. This is because light itself creates space. When light stops so does vision. And when vision stops, so do the confines of a space. Turrell calls this, “using the eyes to penetrate the space.”

Light Changes Perception

This offers a little help in grasping how the absence or presence of light changes our perception of space. To further explain, Turrell points up. He says this earthly phenomenon is best understood by looking up to the atmosphere we experience every day.

In the light of the sun, it is impossible to see stars. However, as the sun goes down, an individual’s penetration of vision goes out, and the stars become evident again. Stars, which are constant in placement, are only visible lights when our eyes are able to perceive them as such. This can only happen when sunlight is mostly absent from our view.

Light and Art: A Relationship

Artists have always looked at the world with curious fascination and longing to use light as a means of creating space. This is why, when artists began using lights, shading, and perspective within paintings, the world marveled at how lifelike the images became. The reality is, like Turrell, artist have always seen what does not exist because they have brilliance all their own.

James Turrell’s first exhibition in a New York museum,  Guggenheim , since 1980, opens June 21 through September 25, 2013. James Turrell is also in Los Angeles at the Los Angeles County Museum until April 6, 2014.

To read more about the effects of life on art, follow the works and study of James Turrell. Here are some helpful links to begin this exploration:

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

-The Importance of Color Vision and Art

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/paint-by-number-color-vision-effects-art-appreciation/

– Are Your Colors What They Seem to be?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/are-your-colors-what-they-seem-to-be/

– The Benefits of Making Art Outside

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-benefits-of-making-art-outside/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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Light Creates Space, Color, and Perception

Light Creates Space, Color, and PerceptionThe unique art of James Turrell infuses space with light. The artist makes entire rooms, museums, and even craters his canvases by transforming large areas into viewing experiences that manipulate how observers perceive their environments when natural and artificial lights alternate.

Turrell has been experimenting with light since 1966. He seems to be fascinated by the way light impacts how an individual understands space, perception, and even color. In relation, the American artist says this about the miraculous correlation:

“We teach the color wheel, but we really should speak about the light frequencies of each eye, and then the context of vision in which they reach the eye, because that’s how we perceive.”

This post explores James Turrell’s approach to art by briefly exploring how light manipulates space, how light changes perception, and the necessary relationship between light and art. At the conclusion, there are resources to inspire further exploration into this intricate subject.

Light Manipulates Space

Most people understand that light affects the way we see color and perceive the world around us. But is it comprehensible that light can manipulate space regardless of physical material? Turrell sets out to prove that a limited and definite space can be created without manmade parameters, like those set up with wood beams, steel rods, or concrete. This is because light itself creates space. When light stops so does vision. And when vision stops, so do the confines of a space. Turrell calls this, “using the eyes to penetrate the space.”

Light Changes Perception

This offers a little help in grasping how the absence or presence of light changes our perception of space. To further explain, Turrell points up. He says this earthly phenomenon is best understood by looking up to the atmosphere we experience every day.

In the light of the sun, it is impossible to see stars. However, as the sun goes down, an individual’s penetration of vision goes out, and the stars become evident again. Stars, which are constant in placement, are only visible lights when our eyes are able to perceive them as such. This can only happen when sunlight is mostly absent from our view.

Light and Art: A Relationship

Artists have always looked at the world with curious fascination and longing to use light as a means of creating space. This is why, when artists began using lights, shading, and perspective within paintings, the world marveled at how lifelike the images became. The reality is, like Turrell, artist have always seen what does not exist because they have brilliance all their own.

To read more about the effects of life on art, follow the works and study of James Turrell. Here are some helpful links to begin this exploration:

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

-The Importance of Color Vision and Art

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/paint-by-number-color-vision-effects-art-appreciation/

– Are Your Colors What They Seem to be?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/are-your-colors-what-they-seem-to-be/

– The Benefits of Making Art Outside

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-benefits-of-making-art-outside/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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FREE Newsletter

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Choosing a Color for Your Business Brand

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Are you searching for a color for your business brand? If so, you are not alone. Small business owners everywhere are thinking about what colors should be representative of their particular business brand. When it comes to business brands, color is extremely important. This is because certain hues can increase positive feelings, whereas other shades can cause a consumer to feel overwhelmed. Read on to find the perfect color for your business brand.

Allow the following color chart to help you decide what shade to choose for your business brand:

— Red — This bold hue increases heart rate and respirations. If you want your business logo/materials to grab customers’ attention, try red.

— Blue — Did you know that “cool blue is perceived as trustworthy, dependable, fiscally responsible and secure”? If you want your business to feel highly professional, opt for blue.

— Green — Do you want to cause your customers to feel relaxed? If so, choose light green. To increase feelings of serenity and health, go for a darker green.

— Pink — Pink is becoming an increasingly popular business brand color. Hot pink is fun and exciting, and may bring a feeling of youthfulness to customers. Light pink is romantic, and “dusty pinks appear sentimental.”

Many small business owners opt for more than one color for a business brand. Here are a few color combinations that are both professional and lovely:

— Tan, brown and light blue

— Cream, black and gold

— Mocha and sage

Business owners often incorporate the color of a brand into their offices/headquarters. This makes the color they choose even more important, since their employees and customers will be seeing it regularly. Some work atmospheres will need to be soothing, whereas others should be more exhilarating. Cool colors, such as blues and greens, are notorious for relaxing the mind and body. Conversely, bold colors, such as red, may have the capacity to energize employees and customers.

What color is your business brand? Why did you choose that particular color? Share with Segmation by commenting on this blog post today.

Sources:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/175428

http://www.ehow.com/way_5163092_business-decorating-ideas.html

If you liked this Segmation blog post, you will enjoy:

— Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/05/03/office-paint-colors-and-effective-employees/

— Fabulous Floral Designs with Painted Counterparts Makes Art Alive

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/fabulous-floral-designs-with-painted-counterparts-makes-art-alive/

— Frans Hals — Dutch Portrait Painter

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/frans-hals-dutch-portrait-painter/

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Introduction to Color Expert Johannes Itten

“Color is life; for a world without color appears to us as dead.” – Johannes Itten

When you take an art course on color theory, you can thank Johannes Itten for laying much of the foundation for what you’re being taught. Johannes Itten was a Swiss artist and teacher who taught at the Bauhaus in Germany. He published several books on art theory, the most popular being The Art of Color.

Sir Isaac Newton is credited with creating the first color wheel, which included 6 colors: red, orange, yellow, green, cyan and blue. Around 250 years later, Johannes Itten expanded Newton’s color wheel to include 12 colors instead of 6. These 12 colors included red, yellow and blue as the primary colors; orange, green and purple as the secondary colors, and 6 intermediary colors created by mixing a primary color with a secondary color. This is the same color wheel often used in school’s today to teach students about color theory.

Itten also examined color saturation, contrast and hue, devising theories for creating different color combinations that are still useful to artists and designers today. He looked at the expressiveness of color, and also the way colors affect one another. He also explored the emotional properties of colors which he considered to be fairly subjective, proposing that we each have different individual reactions to colors.

For more information about Johannes Itten and his color theories, look for his books online or in your local library.

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Do you love Cats?

Cats are great to use in Art! Aren’t cats cuddly, cute, calm, curious, playful, as well as finicky. Cats are among our most popular pets. They come in numerous breeds and coat patterns including Tuxedo (bicolor), Tabby (marbled), Calico (Tortoiseshell), Colorpoint (Siamese), and white. Photorealistic patterns of colorful felines in an assortment of poses and expressions are fun to enjoy painting and so relaxing! Some find cats even cutie! Cats can be found in different kinds of art where there are many great shots of them playing, staring, yawning, and just being curious.

I wonder if our cats know we love them? I know that my cat does. One thing that is for sure they make good companions and they are so sweet! My cat is very affectionate. I think that cats aren’t too much of a hassle to take care of. I don’t see people walking my neighborhood with their cat besides them.

Cats make it fun to paint! I love relaxing and painting cats on my Windows computer! I hope you do as well.

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Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!
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