Tag Archives: Venus

Beautiful Moonglow

Moonglow

Moonglow

 

Pattern Set for SegPlayPC released (see more details here)

The moon’s surface has been studied by telescope since Galileo first observed it in 1609 and firsthand by a total of 12 U.S. astronauts during the six successful lunar landing missions of the US Apollo program. The Moon’s small size and low mean density result in surface gravity that is too low to hold a permanent atmosphere, and therefore it was to be expected that lunar surface characteristics would be very different from those of Earth. The moon is the most ‘human’ of the heavenly bodies, since its phases and the shadows on its surface give it a face, encouraging the popular lore about the ‘Man in the Moon’.

Because the moon rotates in step with the Earth, we can only see about 59% of the moon’s surface. The dark and featureless plains we see on the near side of the moon are called maria, a Latin term for seas.

Bram Stoker who’s 165th birthday is November 8, 2012 also enjoyed Moon!

In our set of Moonglow patterns we showcase photographed images of landscapes, which are lit or dominated with the visible moon. In some patterns, the moon is depicted by itself, while in others, the moon is shown reflecting over calm waters, lighthouses, beaches, bare trees, cloudy skies, rocky coastlines, wheat fields, and mountain ranges.

This set contains 21 paintable patterns.

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Images made available through Creative Common Licenses and do not belong to Segmation

Moonglow

Moonglow

Moonglow

Pattern Set for SegPlayPC released (see more details here)

The moon is Earth’s only natural satellite and we celebrate its beauty in this wonderful pattern set. On June 5-6, 2012, the moon will be used as a mirror when Venus will appear as a tiny black dot crossing the sun’s face. How exciting!

The moon’s surface has been studied by telescope since Galileo first observed it in 1609 and firsthand by a total of 12 U.S. astronauts during the six successful lunar landing missions of the US Apollo program. The Moon’s small size and low mean density result in surface gravity that is too low to hold a permanent atmosphere, and therefore it was to be expected that lunar surface characteristics would be very different from those of Earth. The moon is the most ‘human’ of the heavenly bodies, since its phases and the shadows on its surface give it a face, encouraging the popular lore about the ‘Man in the Moon’.

Because the moon rotates in step with the Earth, we can only see about 59% of the moon’s surface. The dark and featureless plains we see on the near side of the moon are called maria, a Latin term for seas.

In our set of Moonglow patterns we showcase photographed images of landscapes, which are lit or dominated with the visible moon. In some patterns, the moon is depicted by itself, while in others, the moon is shown reflecting over calm waters, lighthouses, beaches, bare trees, cloudy skies, rocky coastlines, wheat fields, and mountain ranges.

This set contains 21 paintable patterns.

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

How Works of Art Become Famous

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Have you ever wondered why certain works of art are so famous? For instance, why does the Mona Lisa enjoy celebrity status, even though there have been scores of other well-painted portraits throughout history?

Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is currently known as the most famous painting in the world, but in previous centuries, it was merely regarded as a well-executed portrait by one of the Renaissance’s greatest luminaries. It wasn’t until the 20th century that the painting skyrocketed to fame. It was stolen in 1911 and recovered in 1913 – two dramatic events that catapulted the painting into the limelight. Mechanical reproduction and commercialism further propelled the fame of the painting, with the image being sold on various types of merchandise as well as appearing in countless advertisements. By now, the Mona Lisa’s fame is self-perpetuating and her legend is well-established.

The Venus de Milo is another example of a work of art that became famous not just for its beauty. Although it is one of only a few extant sculptures from the Classical period, the Venus de Milo enjoys its particular fame due to the massive propaganda efforts put forth by the French in the early 19th century, in an attempt to proclaim that their Venus was a better work of art than an Italian version of the Goddess.

The relative fame of an artwork depends on far more than just skill or execution; factors such as the timing and location of the piece, the social and political atmosphere of when it was created, and the artist’s ability to create an emotional resonance between the artwork and the viewers all play a part in why some artworks are more coveted than others. In the end, a healthy dose of fate, luck or chance doesn’t hurt, either.