Roses May Smell the Same, but Colors Make a Difference

In the year 1600, William Shakespeare wrote, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

These were the words of Juliet. She was justifying the feelings she had for Romeo while disagreeing with their feuding families. As she pealed back the thick layers of what kept them apart, she arrived at an honest analogy: a rose by any other name truly would smell as sweet.

Fast forward four centuries, and the rose is still at the center of conversation. Except, now, it has been discovered that, while all roses smell sweet, roses of different colors communicate different messages.

Recently, Reader’s Digest and proflowers.com got together to share the true meaning behind rose colors. They brought up five colors that may change your perception of roses. Or, at least the color you’ll buy your sweetheart, spouse, best friend, or sibling for Valentine’s Day.

Red

Red represents romance. More specifically, a red rose is known throughout the world as an expression of romantic love.

Yellow

Brighten up a friend’s day with a bouquet of yellow roses. People often think of sunshine when they see the color yellow. Just thinking about brightness can affect a person’s mood and bring joy to a dark moment.

Lavender

Do you believe in love at first sight? Lavender roses are great for young, flourishing relationships. The color is whimsical and has been known to represent royalty. Giving the gift of lavender roses can ensure the recipient feels respected and honored.

Pink

If red is the most popular color for a Valentine, pink is a close second. Rather than romance, however, pink portrays sweetness. According to the experts at proflowers.com, there are two variations of pink roses that have different meanings.

(1)    Dark pink roses are symbolic of gratitude and appreciation, and are a traditional way to say thanks.

(2)    Light pink roses are associated with gentleness and admiration, and can also be used as an expression of sympathy.

White

White roses are classic. In fact, they preceded the romanticism of red roses; at one time, these flowers represented true, romantic love.  Now, they find a place in weddings, as many brides include white roses in their bouquets.

William Shakespeare reminds us that a rose is a rose. But just because they share a sweet scent, doesn’t mean they are all the same. The color of a rose changes its meaning entirely and gives great variety to this beautiful flower.

Segmation has a variety of rose artwork available. The only digital paint by number software allows you to experience every color rose. Click here to pick out your first rose pattern: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=ROS.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Sunflowers are Summer’s Glory

Amazing Wildflower

Poses of Roses

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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6 thoughts on “Roses May Smell the Same, but Colors Make a Difference

  1. knace

    Years ago when I was a teenager living in Fl. we had a rose bush in the back yard that had lavender roses. I haven’t seen any since. I sure wouldn’t mind getting some for Valentine’s Day…or any other day. =)

    Reply

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