Tag Archives: Yellow

Fun Facts About Familiar Colors

Color. It defines our reality, evokes emotion, can affect our choices, and makes a difference in the way we look. All of us are familiar with the primary colors, but this post reveals some little-known facts that may surprise you.

Red:

Red is usually associated with power and passion. It is vibrant, daring, and attracts attention. For instance, think about the responses drawn by red cars and crimson lipstick.

Fun facts about red:

  • Although it’s widely believed that red capes make bulls angry, the reality is that bulls are colorblind. In this instance, the red lining is meant to conceal any bloodstains.
  • Seeing a red object can make your heart beat faster.
  • In China, brides wear red wedding dresses for good luck.
  • There are approximately 23 different shades of red crayons.

Orange:

The artist Wassily Kandinsky once said, “Orange is red brought nearer to humanity by yellow.” It’s one of those colors people love or hate. Vibrant and engaging, it is the only color of the spectrum that gets its name from an object- in this case the orange fruit.

Fun facts about orange:

  • In France, the middle traffic light is orange.
  • In Hindu tradition, orange is an auspicious and sacred color.
  • Orange is both the name and emblematic color of the British royal family.
  • The ‘black boxes’ on aircraft are really bright orange so they can be located more easily.

Yellow:

German writer and statesman Johann von Goethe said in 1840, “With yellow the eye rejoices, the heart expands, the spirit is cheered and we immediately feel warmed.’ The same holds true today: yellow is associated with optimism and enlightenment.

Fun facts about yellow:

  • Although yellow is considered a peaceful color, people lose their tempers more frequently in yellow rooms.
  • Legal pads are yellow because it improves concentration ability.
  • 75% of the pencils sold in the U.S. are yellow.
  • A yellow flag indicates a medical quarantine.

Green:

Green is not just a color anymore; it is a symbol of environmentally friendly products, buildings, and lifestyles. Green has represented growth, regeneration, and fertility since the beginning of time.

Fun facts about green:

  • People waiting to appear on TV wait in ‘green rooms’ because the color can soothe a bad case of the nerves.
  • Hospital decor is usually green because it calms patients.
  • Seamstresses won’t use green thread before a fashion show, fearing it can cause bad luck.
  • Brides in the Middle Ages wore green to represent fertility.

Blue:

Blue is one of the most popular colors. It causes the human body to produce calming chemicals, which is why it’s often used in bedrooms. Blue is also gender-neutral, appealing to both men and women equally.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Fashion consultants recommend wearing blue to job interviews because it represents loyalty.
  • Weightlifters can lift heavier weights in blue-walled gyms.
  • Workers are more productive in blue rooms.
  • Blue plates make food appear less appealing: a note to dieters!

Indigo:

We have Isaac Newton to thank for adding indigo to the color spectrum. He wanted the number of colors to match the seven-tone musical scale of Rene Descartes, so indigo was chosen to bring the color spectrum count to seven.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Black light turns ripe bananas a bright indigo color.
  • During the Elizabethan era, only royalty, nobility, and members of the Council could legally wear indigo.
  • Indigo is often called ‘royal’ blue.
  • The Virgin Mary is frequently depicted wearing indigo clothing.

Purple:

Because it appears so rarely in nature and is expensive to create, purple has a powerful history that has evolved with the centuries. It is the most powerful wavelength of the rainbow and denotes wealth and sophistication.

Fun facts about purple:

  • The Romans used to extract an essence for making purple by boiling thousands of marine snails.
  • In some cultures, purple is the color of mourning.
  • Only two of the world’s flags contain purple.
  • In Italy, performers refuse to go on stage wearing purple.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Colorful Jewelry Inspired by Classic Art

Red Artwork is Worth Fortunes

The Reason Why Barns Are Red

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The Colors of Fall: 5 Shades for a Stylish Season

Fall is rich in color. Changing leaves and autumn décor surrounds us with vibrant scenery. Many people like these colors so much, they choose to infuse their wardrobes with fall colors, too.

Most of the time, traditional fall colors include burnt oranges, rusty browns and deep reds. But for 2014, designers have opted for a diverse, playful palette.

Here are the five colors that will have you looking stylish and turning heads this season:

  1. Gray

A strong neutral, gray can be worn from head to toe for a classy, sophisticated look. It’s strongest however when complemented by a drop of color. Think of an orange belt, for instance, or a plum blouse beneath a gray coat. Such combinations allow for a subdue look that still stands out.

The trick is finding the right shade of gray. You will want to find something that matches your complexion. For instance, a blond with light skin tone may want to go with something soft and pale, while brunettes may choose deep tones, like charcoal.

  1. Orchid

Radiant orchid is 2014’s Pantone Color of the Year, making it a top color choice for every season.

Orchid is a fun color to play with, allowing for many creative options. Have fun trying them out. One combination sure to pop is orchid and cognac. The look is elegant and classy, striking and unexpected.

  1. Orange

More often than not, orange seems to be the color that defines fall. However, just because it is widely accepted doesn’t mean that it is easy to pull off. As with gray, the secret to orange is skin tone. Match the right shade of orange with your unique coloring.

Also, remember that a little orange goes a long way. An orange belt. An orange handbag. The effect this accent color has can be striking.

  1. Green

The color green is all around us. Look at nature for a second. There are millions of different colored flowers, all with green leaves and stems. Bright forest green is particularly in fashion this year.

When choosing outfits that include forest green, use contrasting colors to complement it. Think navy. Think plum. You definitely don’t want your colors to clash, and green is extra tricky in this regard. If you go soft with green, go deep with your complementary color, and vice versa. An outfit sure to win is green combined with gray flannel or tweed.

  1. Yellow

Don’t shy away from yellow this year. It is the colorful touch you need to brighten up this season. But subtlety is important; don’t go overboard. Know that yellow is especially effective as an accessory.

Yellow has an interesting effect on people’s minds. It’s strongly associated with laughter, happiness, and the sun. These associations can affect our moods and perceptions. Therefore, wearing yellow may give you the ability to brighten people’s days in more ways than one.

These five colors are not your only options for fall, of course. When you wear colors that compliment your skin tone and natural coloring, anything can go. Get experimental and have a little fun. Use the above tips to get started, but add your own flair. Fall 2014 is going to be a great season for the daring stylist.

Read more Segmation blog posts about fall colors:

Leaf Art in your Backyard

Ideas for Creating Halloween Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

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How did the yellow school bus come about anyways?

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Love it or hate it, yellow is here to stay. The color wheel’s brightest shade can be seen on the road every day. But neither cars nor trucks have the unique yellow paint jobs that belong to school buses. How did the yellow school bus come about anyways? And why are school buses still being painted this shade?

History of the Yellow School Bus

Knowing the colorful history of yellow school buses sheds light on this timeless tradition. The lineage of the school bus dates back to the 1930s when a man by the name of Frank Cyr conducted an in depth study of student transportation vehicles throughout the United States.

At the beginning of his research, Cyr, a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University, was observing school buses that cost (on average) $2,000. Quickly he found out that these vehicles had little in common. Various manufacturers, schools, and districts used different buses.

This inspired him to call a conference of educators in spring 1939. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss a standard protocol for school buses. The end result was a 42 page manual that discussed the ins and outs of the school bus. In this manual, the color was declared: national school bus chrome.

National School Bus Yellow

In 2010, the questionable use of “chrome” was exchanged for “yellow”. Still, the color seen on school buses today was the color decided at the conference over seven decades ago. The precise shade of yellow was taken so seriously, that a committee was appointed just to decided which one of 50 shades of yellow would appear on the school bus.

Why has the Color not Changed?

Once national school bus yellow was decided, it became a nationwide mandate. One of the original reasons for the broad directive was because school bus manufacturers “had to have different booths to spray-paint them.” More so, the color became a universal symbol of student transportation.

In fact, most Americans have been raised in environments where yellow school buses shuttle children to and from school. It is hard to imagine life without them.

Source:
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/why-are-school-buses-yellow-a-teachers-college-professor-said-so/

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Welcome Spring with a Freshly Painted Front Door

door,red,blue,color,home,spring,yellow,change

Spring is here, and with it will come a plethora of beautiful colors. The May flowers that April showers bring display lovely shades of red, purple, yellow and blue. With the wave of new life and vibrant color that is soon-to-come, many homeowners will be thinking about Spring cleaning as a preparation for Summer. In addition to thoroughly cleaning, giving your home an external “makeover” would be the ideal activity to welcome Spring. Believe it or not, simply painting your front door can drastically change the appearance of your entire home and make it the feature of your neighborhood.

Painting your front door is perhaps the most inexpensive way to change the look and feel of your house. The colors you have to choose from are endless, but some of the most popular front door shades include:

— Yellow — This bright and sunny hue inspires feelings of happiness, warmth and joy. Yellow is the ideal shade of door paint for a home that is a drab color (such as grey). Painting your front door yellow is definitely the best way to make your home “pop” and stand out to visitors.

— Red — Warm, sultry, passionate — these are all words that are associated with the color red. Applied to a front door,red,blue,color,home,spring,yellow,change door, red truly makes a statement. Interestingly, early American homes with red doors were thought to be exceptionally welcoming. Those drawn to Americana-style decor will likely love the look of a bright red front door.

— Green — Homeowners who are ready for a fresh start and a renewed sense of vitality might want to opt for a green door. Mint and lime are two colors that have been wildly popular lately; these shades are sure to bring a house to life and cause visitors to feel refreshed.

— Blue — Did you know that blue is one of the most stunning front door hues for brick homes? Blue also looks beautiful against natural siding. Those who are ready to quickly and inexpensively change the look of their home should consider a vibrant shade of blue for their front door.

What color is your front door? If you could paint your entryway door any shade in celebration of Spring, what color would you choose? Share with Segmation by leaving a comment below.

Sources:

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/6861936/list?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u227&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery12

Coming soon: If you love art as well as technology, you won’t want to miss our upcoming blog post about word cloud portraits.

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Using Complimentary Colors

For some artists, the use of complimentary colors may seem like the basic of the basics. Without much thought they may discount their effect and use them as if they are second nature. But let’s not forget, sometimes simplicity can be the most elegant and (ironically) sophisticated approach to an artists color scheme. Using complimentary colors is an easy and certain approach to deliver works of art.

Reference the Color Wheel for Complimentary Colors

Lets address the color wheel. A lot has changed here. For centuries artists were limited in terms of what specific shades of color they had access to. Because of this, much of history’s most famous artists were compelled to use the simple pairings of complimentary colors, found on the basic color wheel. These pairings are…

  • Red and Green
  • Blue and Orange
  • Yellow and Violet

You’ll notice that the complimentary colors are simply opposites on the color wheel. With the ever- expanding body of knowledge we’ve dubbed “Color Theory”, the color wheel itself has changed immensely.

The HSV Color Wheel

What you are more likely to see as a representation of your color choices today – looks something like the HSV color wheel to the left. The same principles apply, that opposites are complimentary, but as you can see it offers a vast multitude of shades not found on the standard color wheel. Now instead of trying to achieve the feel of a romantic Italian town with solid reds and greens, an artist can take inspiration from the HSV wheel and instantly hand pick shades of Sage green and Venetian red. This work previously (depending on your skills and way of expression) could take hours of mixing to define the desired colors intent. Now with the digital age, we can find a representation of the colors in our minds before we start to mix and blend. This is a huge advantage of artists today that is largely overlooked.

Finding new color schemes and developing more complex characteristics for a piece is still interesting. However, if you find yourself stuck, or not conveying the images and thoughts you would like, then take a look at the HSV color wheel and find your complexity in all of the wheels simplicity.

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What are your Summer Colors?

Thinking about summer usually evokes thoughts of vibrant colors and warm temperatures. In fact, mental flashes with shades of yellow, sky blue and soft orange can be tormenting during drab winter months. Let’s face it, a 90 degree summer day is the only appropriate time to pull out the yellow linen table cloth, light blue Bahama-shorts and fill your drink glass with colorful fruits.

So, we have to ask: What are your summer colors?

In Martha Stewart’s 60 Days of Color 2011, she shares 19 colorful images that are sure to spawn ideas about how you can incorporate summer colors into your warm days. After flipping through some of the pictures, Martha’s favorite summer colors become apparent.

Summer Colors according to Martha Stewart

  • Dramatic Yellow
    • Martha Stewart repeatedly uses yellow as her primary color. To compliment this shade she pairs it with a variety of greens. The yellow has a deep tone, closer to a shade of mustard, and nowhere near the color of a street sign. This allows her to use the summer color in large, solid amounts. However, the shade can also carry an entire design and dominate the swirling motion of flower patterns. No matter how it is used, this deep shade of yellow adds brightness to a room without overwhelming the eyes.
  • Shades of Blue
    • Martha Stewart uses a myriad of blue shades in her collection of summer colors. She often uses light blues to cover large background areas, such as walls, bedspreads and curtains. This allows light to flow through the room and reflect off of dramatic blue accents. Various pieces that are dark blue include throw blankets, vases and paint trim.
  • Orange: the soft and the bold
    • In her 2011 collection of summer colors, Martha Stewart features some bold rooms with bright accents. Perhaps she does this because her readers spend so much time surrounded by dark colors in those drab winter months. The bold rooms photographed are filled with burnt orange, dark woods and deep greens. Something she uses to splash these dark settings with summer color are light orange accents, soft peach center pieces and lots of complimentary candle light.
Martha Stewart has named her summer colors. Have you chosen yours?

There is still time to pick your 2011 summer colors. Immerse yourself in a world of color by doing a leisure summer activity. Paint by number with Segmation is certain to bring out the color expert in you.

Image made available by Shahram Sharif on Flickr through Creative Common License

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All About Yellow Pigments www.segmation.com

Yellow is one of the three primary colors, which means it is often used in painting – from capturing the warm rays of a golden sun, to a field full of sunflowers, to the flickering flames of fire. Here is an overview of some of the most common yellow pigments you’ll use when painting:

Yellow Ochre (sometimes called Mars Yellow) is a non-toxic natural clay pigment. In fact, it is one of the oldest pigments in the world, used by our prehistoric ancestors. Yellow Ochre has a tan, sandy appearance.

Naples Yellow was once made from toxic synthetic pigments that were used abundantly by the Old Masters, but today’s version is made from modern, non-toxic substances. Naples Yellow usually has a light, pale appearance.

Cadmium Yellow is another historically toxic pigment (Cadmium Sulfide) that was used by artists in the late 19th century. It now contains a non-toxic replacement (usually Azo pigments), but is still called Cadmium Yellow. Cadmium Yellow has a very bright yellow appearance.

Azo Yellow (also called Hansa Yellow) is a dye-based synthetic pigment invented in the early 20th century. Azo Yellow is usually bright but it is also pale and translucent compared to Cadmium Yellow.

Each of these yellow pigments adds something different to your palette. If you are painting a still life, landscape or portrait that requires the use of yellow, consider the different properties of these yellows to decide which one (or more) would work best for what you need.

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