Category Archives: Pink

Roses May Smell the Same, but Colors Make a Difference

In the year 1600, William Shakespeare wrote, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

These were the words of Juliet. She was justifying the feelings she had for Romeo while disagreeing with their feuding families. As she pealed back the thick layers of what kept them apart, she arrived at an honest analogy: a rose by any other name truly would smell as sweet.

Fast forward four centuries, and the rose is still at the center of conversation. Except, now, it has been discovered that, while all roses smell sweet, roses of different colors communicate different messages.

Recently, Reader’s Digest and got together to share the true meaning behind rose colors. They brought up five colors that may change your perception of roses. Or, at least the color you’ll buy your sweetheart, spouse, best friend, or sibling for Valentine’s Day.


Red represents romance. More specifically, a red rose is known throughout the world as an expression of romantic love.


Brighten up a friend’s day with a bouquet of yellow roses. People often think of sunshine when they see the color yellow. Just thinking about brightness can affect a person’s mood and bring joy to a dark moment.


Do you believe in love at first sight? Lavender roses are great for young, flourishing relationships. The color is whimsical and has been known to represent royalty. Giving the gift of lavender roses can ensure the recipient feels respected and honored.


If red is the most popular color for a Valentine, pink is a close second. Rather than romance, however, pink portrays sweetness. According to the experts at, there are two variations of pink roses that have different meanings.

(1)    Dark pink roses are symbolic of gratitude and appreciation, and are a traditional way to say thanks.

(2)    Light pink roses are associated with gentleness and admiration, and can also be used as an expression of sympathy.


White roses are classic. In fact, they preceded the romanticism of red roses; at one time, these flowers represented true, romantic love.  Now, they find a place in weddings, as many brides include white roses in their bouquets.

William Shakespeare reminds us that a rose is a rose. But just because they share a sweet scent, doesn’t mean they are all the same. The color of a rose changes its meaning entirely and gives great variety to this beautiful flower.

Segmation has a variety of rose artwork available. The only digital paint by number software allows you to experience every color rose. Click here to pick out your first rose pattern:

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Sunflowers are Summer’s Glory

Amazing Wildflower

Poses of Roses

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Dressy Gals Ballerina

“The latest involvement I see would be “holiday fantasy” which I am using bright colors, amusing shapes, and “magical” touches such as glitter.”

-Jasmine Flynn

Jasmine specializes in visual design and contributes her talents into many designing factors. Whether it’s fashion design, illustration, product design, advertisement, or constructing finalized projects she places her best effort in the completion of any work she assigns herself to or assigned to. The process of design has always intrigued Jasmine artistically, to possess the ability to create is something she holds dearly as something valuable. Jasmine describes her work by allowing to communicate for itself to the viewer, and to allow herself as an artist to simply contribute her gift in limitless ways.

Stop by Segmation’s SegPlay Mobile on iPhone/iPad and Android to see young talented Jasmine Flynn’s Dressy Gals and Dressy Guys Segmation Patterns. Dressy Guys includes various styles including a Green vested, Checkered, Gentlemen, Circle Fashion, Family Fashion and the ever popular Doo Wop! Dressy Gals is another set from Jasmine Flynn, who has an eye for fashion. Dressy Gals includes several neat looking colorful outfits and models, including the Blue Square, the Blue and Purple, the Red Diamond outfit, Ballerina, Summer Outfit and the Pink Haired girl!

Dressy Gals - Pink Haired Girl

Dressy Gals – Pink Haired Girl

Dressy Guys Green Vested

Dressy Guys Green Vested

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art:

Tips for Improving your Landscape Drawing Skills

Extracting Art from Science

The Creative, Artistic and Inventive Mind of Leonardo da Vinci 

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On Jasmine Flynn’s flickr account, you will find a large variety of drawings that she has posted since 2011. She also is a contributor to Keel Magazine at

Dressy Gals Blue Square

Blue is for Boys, Pink is for Girls

Blue is for Boys and Pink is for GirlsMany expecting parents are going with a new trend; they are painting nurseries neutral colors. Are people trying to get away from common childhood stereotypes? Whoever said blue is for boys and pink is for girls?

Even though it is true today, color has not always perceived this way. Before the middle of the 20th century, children were not assigned gender specific colors. In fact, there is a lot of debate about the masculinity of the color pink; how some of the world’s most honorable men wore dresses; and what colors really attribute to males and females.

Is the pendulum swinging back to center? Are neutral-colored parents taking a stance against societal norms? Or is this saying true: blue is for boys and pink is for girls?

The Masculine Color Pink

Pink can be seen in the men’s sections of most clothing stores – even if it is not always referred to as pink. Some men opt to call it, “salmon.” Regardless of title, the point is this: a lot of men look good in this color.

Back in the day, pink was not seen as a “dainty” color or overly feminine, as it is today. Actually, during World War II this color was used in military combat – and there is nothing feminine about war.  At one point, the British painted an entire militia of warships pink. They thought this hue would blend in at dusk. The tactic was used to confuse the Germans. Did it work?

Honorable Men Wore Dresses

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt was two and a half years old, he was pictured wearing a long white dress with shiny black shoes and long curly hair. His mother was not mistaken about his gender – this look was appropriate for boys in the late 19th century. In fact, during this era, it was appropriate for boys to wear dresses until the age of seven. White cotton dresses went well with white cloth diapers. They were functional and easy to clean.

Who’s Whose Color?

It was not until the middle of the 1900’s that blue and pink were attributed to boys and girls. Even then, it was said that pink was for boys and blue was for girls. This was stated in an article printed in the trade publication, Earnshaw’s Infants’ Department, in June of 1918.  

All this changed, however, in the 1940’s. After World War II, boys began dressing like their fathers, and girls like their mothers.

Gender specific colors go to show how inseparable colors are to the human psyche. Much of a person’s identity comes from the apparel he or she dons. Many children learn about their genders by the colors they wear and play with. But will blue always be for boys? And will pink forever be a girl’s color? Or will the pendulum swing again?


Prison Pink

Prison PinkWhat do you associate with the color pink? Love? Romance? Valentine’s Day hearts and flowers? Cotton candy or a baby blanket?

Truth be told, pink represents many pleasant aspects of life.

What if this color was used to encourage happy emotions and combat negative ones?

This is the thought behind a color psychology experiment being implemented in some correctional facilities. In other words, prison walls are being painted pink.

Why Are Prisons Pink?

Several prisons are curious about the affects pink has on inmates. Adding a colorful approach to drab décor, wardens and sheriffs hope to minimize aggressive behavior. One sheriff who overseas a detention center in Buffalo, Missouri says, “Pink is a non-aggressive color.”

Many color experts would agree, saying some shades of pink are believed to have calming effects on emotions. In theory, pink should act as an energy zapper, hopefully putting a stop to conflict before it starts.

What is the Shade of Prison Pink?

The popular prison hue is known as “Drunk-tank Pink.” The official title is Baker-Miller Pink (R:255, G:145, B:175).

Choosing the right shade of pink is important for this color experiment. As one color psychologist points out, “Not all pinks are created equal.” There is some debate over whether or not pink has calming properties. More research still needs to be done on which pinks prove to have soothing effects in intense environments.

Does Prison Pink Work?

Another argument surfacing about the power of pink is how long feelings of relaxation last. Some sources say the positive sensation will only last for a short period of time. It is speculated that within 15-30 minutes of exposure, the body will return to aggressive instincts.

Others believe that it is physically impossible to feel uneasy in a pink environment. One biosocial researcher claims, “The heart muscles can’t race fast enough,” in this type of setting.

Will this technique work? Can the color pink limit violent and aggressive behavior in inmates?

Pink may not create a utopian society within prison walls, but many facilities are willing to test the theory.

How does color effects your emotions. Have you noticed calming effects when in pink environments?

Read more Segmation blog posts about Color Therapy:

Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

The Psychology of Color

Colors Change What is Beautiful

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Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

Office Paint Colors and Effective EmployeesMuch thought goes into choosing the right interior wall color for a home. Often times, the paint color reflects individual preferences, décor choices, and whatever mood the homeowner wants to incite. This is an important decision; after all, a person spends a lot of time at his or her home.

However, in one week, the same person may spend an equal amount of time at an office – and sometimes more. Therefore, shouldn’t office paint colors be chosen with the same consideration?

Rather than simply going with drab gray or off white, office paint colors ought to be chosen to compliment company culture, office décor, and the business brand. When trying to create a productive ambiance, picking the right wall color is of high importance.

Wall color not only compliments the company identity, it has an effect on employees. Office paint colors have been known to raise energy levels, encourage positive attitudes, lift moods, and influence work behavior.

Below are three color options and combinations that are known to have a positive effect on a workplace.

Green and Blue

What do you think of when you walk into an office or home that is painted with green and blue colors? Often, people respond that this color combination helps them feel peaceful. Shades of green and blue are often seen as tranquil and can rid an environment of excess stress. Also, green is known to be easy on the eyes, and may even lessen the amount of eyestrain employees are exposed to from working on computers.

Yellow and Orange

When working in a high energy environment, yellow and orange wall paint colors are known to “stimulate and energize employees.” For obvious reasons, these boisterous colors promote a unique zest for life and business. A greater benefit of painting an office yellow could be its effect on memory; yellow is said to help employees remain mentally sharp with memory recall.

Red and Pink

Similar to yellow, walls painted with the color red may also stimulate memories, as well as “increase brain wave activities, heart rates, and respiration.” While these characteristics may not be conducive in all company cultures, it can have a significant impact of high energy firms. Pink, on the other hand, is a unique office wall paint color to consider because it has an opposite effect in evoking feelings of relaxation.

Is your office (or home away from home) painted with colors that affect you and your coworkers in positive ways? Have you walked into an office and immediately felt “at home”? What wall colors do you think work well in office environments?

Coming Soon: 

Choosing the color for your brand is a very big decision for all small business owners. The right color can lead to business success. The wrong color can cause headaches.

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you will also like:

— The Many Different Hues of Blue

— Company Uses Color to Create a Sense of Identity

— What are your Summer Colors?

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Company Uses Color to Create a Sense of Identity

The way color affects individuals is simply remarkable. Different tones can create moods, evoke emotions, and make statements. Brides understand this and often choose their wedding shades prior to making any other plans. Art therapists understand the power of color and utilize it for healing purposes. Also, nothing is as effective at setting an ambiance than color. It’s undeniable that shades and tones are forces to be reckoned with.

For J Public Relations, color has created a sense of identity as a company. JPR, a firm whose specialty is “eateries” and hotels, is truly unlike any professional office you have ever encountered. This is because it is bathed in pink. Pink walls and light fixtures, and even pink accessories and graphics grace the offices of J Public Relations. JPR’s kitchen even boasts this happy shade. This has many people asking one simple question: why pink?

Jamie Sigler Pescatello and Kim Julin Guyader, founders J Public Relations, were the brains behind the pink offices located in New York City. They chose the shade first because they favored it, and second because they believed it would make the firm distinct from competitors. Pescatello and Guyader also found the color to be “playful and powerful,” and thought it represented the firm’s personality.

When Pescatello and Guyader first visited their current office space they were less than impressed. In fact, they were downright frightened by the 3,300 square feet that used to be a law firm. The peeling wallpaper and dark color scheme of the offices almost scared the founders of JPR away, but over time they became convinced that they could create the work space they imagined. A few knocked-down walls and buckets of pink paint later, J Public Relations had offices that continue to inspire creativity in its 24 staff members (who are, by the way, all female, “though unintentionally”).

It turns out that the founders of J Public Relations had a brilliant idea when they dreamed of pink. The lovely color that has come to define JPR has attracted interviewers and is inspiring articles and blog posts. The office space of J Public Relations is an example of the amazing ability color has to create and cement a sense of identity.

Note: all pictures were found on J Public Relations’ website ( and

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