Tag Archives: Students

Easter Egg Decorating Project Can Teach Kids About Color

Easter is fast approaching, and with it comes the promise of chocolate bunnies, baskets full of goodies, and colorful Easter eggs. There is perhaps no Springtime project kids (and adults) enjoy more than decorating Easter eggs.

Creating beautiful Easter eggs isn’t just fun; it is also educational. In fact, you can use an Easter egg project to teach kids about primary and secondary colors. Read on to find instructions for this activity.

Note: You will need vinegar, food coloring (blue, yellow and red), an egg rack or egg carton and egg spoons for this project.

imagesEducational Easter Egg Project Instructions:

1. Briefly explain to your students what primary and secondary colors are.

2. Take three clear glasses or plastic cups and fill them with water. Using food coloring, color one glass of water red, one blue, and the other yellow. (You will need about 20 drops of food coloring to make a bright color.) Reiterate to students that these are primary colors.

3. To demonstrate color mixing, have a student pour the primary colors (in equal parts) into another clear cup or glass; the three combined primary colors will create a dark brown/black hue. Explain to the students that colors mix together to make other colors.

4. Next, have a student mix equal part blue and yellow water to make green, red and yellow water to make orange, and red and blue water to make violet. Explain that orange, green and violet are secondary colors and are made by mixing primary colors.

5. By now you should have glasses of orange, violet, green, black, red, blue, and yellow water. These are the colors you will use to shade your Easter eggs.

6. Add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to each cup of colored water.images-1

7. Have students take turns dunking one cooled, hard boiled egg into each cup. (It is easiest to place eggs onto an egg spoon before dunking.) Have the students leave eggs in the colored vinegar water for at least 3 minutes before removing them. The longer an egg is in the colored water, the more vibrant the resulting hue will be.

8. Instruct students to remove eggs and gently place them on a wire rack or an egg carton. After the eggs dry, create an Easter egg display or let each student take an egg home.

Coloring Easter eggs is a fun, easy Springtime tradition. It is also an excellent activity for teaching kids about primary and secondary colors and color mixing.

Do you enjoy coloring Easter eggs? What is your favorite childhood memory of Easter egg decorating? Share with us in the comments box below.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Having fun with Easter Eggcitement Art & Crafts

Color Symbolism in Medieval Christian Art

Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Advertisement

Liza Amor Shows Las Vegas What Happens in the Art Room

www.segmation.comLas Vegas is known to draw international tourists but has recently been drawing art enthusiasts as well. Art galleries throughout Sin City are reporting increased traffic and sales. The University of Las Vegas Art Galleries director Jerry Schefcik credits the creativity of hotel design for infusing art into Las Vegas culture, but the art featured in galleries goes far beyond casino kitsch. Schefcik says, “…the overall art scene in Vegas is growing because it attracts artists who think outside the box.”

One Las Vegas artist and art educator who fits this description is Liza Amor. She uses out of the box ideas to ensure her students’ artwork is seen and appreciated.

From a young age Liza was drawn to art. At four years old, drawing was one of her favorite pastimes. And as one of Liza’s favorite adages goes, “Practice makes perfect.” By the time she was looking to attend college, Liza had talent that could take her places. She was able to attend State University of New York at Buffalo.

While in college, Liza was greatly impacted by an after school art program she assisted with. Recognizing the importance of art education encouraged her career path and put her on a professional mission.

Today, Liza lives in Las Vegas and believes it is important for the community to see what happens in the art room. When people realize how valuable art education is, there is a higher chance (despite devastating budget cuts) art classes will remain in public schools.

To accomplish this, Liza partners with local galleries, like City of the World gallery, to see that her students’ artwork is showcased throughout Las Vegas. She also makes work available online through the virtual art gallery, Artsonia. This allows students to share their art with family members beyond Nevada’s borders.

art-classHer students are encouraged by having their art showcased. They are proud to post their work and appreciative to have such opportunities. “There is a big difference when you believe in them,” says Liza. When preparing them for their exhibits, she impresses the importance of this honor, telling them that they are representing themselves and their school.

After putting on annual art shows for her students, serving on the board of Art Educators of Nevada and displaying her own work throughout Las Vegas, Liza Amor was awarded National Art Education Association’s 2014 Nevada Art Educator of the Year. Beyond her talent and teaching skills, Liza is showing Las Vegas the value of art education. Right now she is on top of a cutting edge art scene and the world is beginning to take notice.

Read more Segmation blog posts about colorful artist:

Is an art education necessary?

What does a Good Art Teacher Look Like?

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

 

 

What do School Colors and Mascots Represent?

What do School Colors and Mascots RepresentPeople take a lot of pride in their schools. At every age, school colors and mascots unify centers of education. Most schools chose a combination of colors to represent the student body; this offers clear distinction from cross town rivals. To set themselves apart, schools get creative with who or what will represent them.

Student bodies are often the ones to come up with mascot characters. These representatives are picked with thoughtfulness, creativity, and some zany ideas. To exemplify this point, which will be expounded on later, envision a banana slug, an artichoke, and a holiday tree.

But how do these masterminds come up with the latest designs?  What makes a mascot significant?

Mascots embody characteristics and values of the entire school. They make a point and hold true to the cultural and historical significance of the education center. And it doesn’t hurt that mascots are entertaining too.

Mascots Make a Point

The spirit of a student body is electrifying. Mascots draw on this energy by representing collective beliefs. Two schools exemplify this:

  • UC Santa Cruz students were deliberate in their decisions to choose a banana slug for a mascot. They believe sports should be available to everyone, which is why one of the lowliest creatures represents them; Sammy the Banana Slug gets to be part of the fun too.
  • Scottsdale Community College has a fighting artichoke named Artie cheering them on. Sick of the amount of money sports takes from school budgets, students picked something that would represent their disinterest.

In both examples, students used art in the form of a school mascot to make their views evident.

Mascots Honor Cultural and Historic significance

Mascots stand – and often dance – for school ideals. Education institutions are foundational to communities. The citizens in surrounding areas often look to schools to honor the heritage of the town or city. This is why mascots often rally students together and stand as an expression of goodwill. They are a means to making students feel as though they belong to something bigger. Within the community, schools are a driving force in maintaining pride of involves everyone’s efforts.

Examples of mascots that represent community values include the University of Texas Longhorns, The University of Colorado Buffaloes, and more.

Years out of school, people rarely remember what final scores were for homecoming football games. But they always remember their school colors and mascots. Beyond this, people are drawn to these images for the rests of their lives. The entertainment it provides is great but the memories are far more than that: schools have characteristics that shape the identities of students and communities.

Image made available by KKfromBB on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Education:

How to Encourage Creativity in Children

Inspiring Digital Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com