Tag Archives: shades

The Evolution of Crayola Crayon Colors

1c The Evolution of Crayola Crayon ColorsIf you explore colors at Crayola.com you are greeted by a display of pixilated colors, but the varying shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple only tell half the story. Today, there are over 120 Crayola crayon colors. This is a far cry from the eight colors Binney & Smith first presented in 1903.

Many of us agree that color seems to be one of life’s constants. Crayola might agree, arguing that their colorful crayons don’t change; they multiply.

In fact, after evaluating the evolution of Crayola colors between 1903 and 2010, it appears that Crayola crayon colors grow 2.56 percent each year. According to artist/scientist Stephen Von Worley’s blog, datapointed.net, this means Crayola crayon colors double every 28 years. Therefore, 120 colors today may mean 330 shades in 2050. To this, Worley says, “…Crayola’s gonna need a bigger box…”

This may bring up the question, might we discover more colors?

It may be possible to answer this question by tracing the Crayola crayon collection back to its roots. The original eight colors were known as hues. Hues are pure colors. If white is added to hues, a new family of color is born. These colors are known as tints. When gray is added to hues, the newly produced colors are known as tones. Adding black to hues creates shades. In calculating the amount of colors that derive from hues, tints, tones and shades we have 32 colors, which is only half of Crayola’s “Big Box.”

1a The Evolution of Crayola Crayon ColorsLooking at the chart posted on datapointed.net, Crayola Color Chart, 1903-2010, it is evident that Crayola colors go far beyond mixing white, gray, and black with pure colors. Crayola mixes colors with colors to create crayons like “Lavender Lollipop Violet,” “Mountain Meadow,” and “Red Orange.” They even have two shades titled, “Blue Green” and “Green Blue.” Ironically enough, these are two completely different crayons.

However, Crayola also discontinues crayon colors. Some of the recent retirees include, “magic mint” and “orange red.”

In recent years, Crayola has led the innovation of colors with collections like “Multicultural,” which includes skin tone shades that match many ethnicities. They also boast metallic, gel, and glitter collections.

Crayola is known to think outside the box when it comes to research and development. Therefore, it is hard to say they’ve found every color under the sun. This company is in the color creation business. We might have to wait until 2050 to see just how many more colors they create.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art

The Evolution of Paint by Number

The Evolution of Artists’ Colors

4 Reminders Why Art is Important

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Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades – What’s the Difference?

Who Creates Color TrendsLet’s face the facts: we can easily take color for granted. Even when we are enjoying the brilliant hues of nature and the masterful shades in paintings, it is hard to be fully aware of the colorful intricacies we are taking in.

Case in point: do you know the difference between hues, tints, tones and shades?

To some, it comes as a shock to learn that these colorful qualities make up multiple tiers of the color wheel.

Basic and Intricate Elements of the Color Wheel

At first glance, the color wheel is a tool that guides us in using primary, secondary and complementary colors. But it also does much more than this. It describes analogous colors (any three colors that sit side by side), split complementary colors (which considers the two colors adjacent to a complimentary hue), and tetradic colors (a group of four colors, made up of two complimentary colors).

Beyond defining aesthetic color combinations, the color wheel also offers a good starting point from which tints, tones and shades can be properly identified.

The color wheel at its most basic form is made up of 12 hues. Hues are pure colors. When white is added to hues, they lighten and become known as tints. When gray is added to hues, they dim and become known as tones. When black is added to hues, they darken and become shades.

This excellent image, compliments of lifehacker.com, shows the many levels of the color wheel:

Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good

Using Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades

Different tiers of the color wheel come in handy when decorating, designing graphics, deciding on outfits or preparing works of art. For instance, matching a hue with its complementary shade can make for a dynamic combination. Sometimes, people find hues to be strong and bold. They may prefer light, more whimsical tints or are drawn to the calmer depths of shades.

More so, it can be nice to use one hue and its tints, shades and tones. This creates a monotone chromatic color scheme. In the same vein, a monotone achromatic color scheme uses all variations of neutral colors and can be brought to life with a brilliant hue.

Did you know the color wheel was so intricate? To learn more about the differences between hues, tints, tones and shades, as well as learn how to pick the best looking combinations for your wardrobe, home décors and art projects, check out this blog post: http://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-color-theory-to-know-what-looks-goo-1608972072.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel, but the most important thing to know is it won’t steer you wrong.

Read more Segmation blog posts about color theory:

Basic Color Theory – Color Matters

Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

How Well Do You Know The Color Wheel?

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Gender/Color Divide

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How many colors can you see? It’s easy to start rattling them off, but after a couple dozen, you may find yourself struggling to keep the list going. In reality, most of us are trichromats, which means we have three standard cones in our retinas to detect blue, green, and red. From there, our brains can discern about 1 million different shades made up of those three primary colors.

 

While you’re still reeling from that number, consider this: studies have shown that a small percentage of women are tetrachromats — in addition to the standard three cones in their retinas, they have an extra fourth cone that allows them to pick up a total of 100 million shades! That’s a whole lot of Crayolas.

Interestingly, men don’t have the potential for this color-detecting superpower. That’s because the extra gene is found on the X chromosome, and men have only one of those. Since women have two X chromosomes, there’s a rare possibility (2-3%) that they’ll have two types of red cones on each one.

In many cases, tetrachromats may not even realize their heightened sensitivity to color variations — until someone else points it out.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Gender artwork:

Blue is for Boys, Pink is for Girls

Do Men and Women See Colors Differently?

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The Stories Behind Holiday Colors

http://sierraclub.typepad.com/greenlife/2009/12/emphasizing-the-green-in-kwanzaa.html

December is here, and that means individuals all around the world will be celebrating holidays like Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa, just to name a few. The December season is a favored time of year that is associated with excellent food, gifts, and time spent with family. Not only that, holiday seasons are often represented by unique, symbolic colors. Have you ever wondered why certain colors are designated to different holiday seasons? Let’s find out…

What do Kwanzaa’s shades symbolize?

Kwanzaa, established in 1966, is one of the most recent holidays to be founded. The colors used in Kwanzaa celebrations are red, black, and yellow. Related to Kwanzaa, green stands for “the land of Africa and hope for the future.” Red symbolizes the blood of Africans who have passed away, whereas black represents the skin shade of Africans. Kwanzaa, which is a holiday that honors African-American culture, centers on creativity, faith, self-determination, and togetherness.

Blue and white are significant to Jewish culture.

 Most people are aware of the fact that the blue and white shades represented in Hanukkah décor are the colors of the Israeli flag. But what do these shades symbolize? According to a rabbinical interpretation, blue represents divine revelation as well as heaven. Better than any other color, white symbolizes cleanliness and purity. These colors that are so prominent in the design of the Israeli flag are also displayed on the Jewish prayer shawl (tallit), making them an integral part of Jewish culture.

Why red and green for Christmas?

The famed shades for Christmas are, without a doubt, green and red. But what do these colors represent? Green is representative of the evergreen tree, which symbolizes eternal life and the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Red may represent the blood of Christ, but researchers are unsure of the exact symbolic meaning of this shade. What they do know, though, is that the combination of red and green likely stems from holly Christmas decorations that were used in Europe in the Middle Ages.

Make this Holiday season more memorable by creating your own seasonally themed works of art. Segmation offers a SegPlayPC Christmas Time pattern “paint-by-numbers” collection that makes it easy and fast to enjoy the Christmas Time celebration and more. Learn more about Segmation’s Christmas Time pattern collection by visiting http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternsets.asp#CHR.

Sources:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/what-color-is-your-holiday-chr-104238

Coming Soon: Read Segmation’s exclusive article about the season that inspired so much of famed artist Norman Rockwell’s timeless works.

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Use Color to Bring Your Home to Life

Most people would agree that color has the ability to bring something (or someone) to life. For this reason, nearly everyone who has a home uses color not just to decorate with but to create a certain ambiance. Some individuals long for the beach cottage look and opt for cool, neutral tones reminiscent of the Oceanside. Others desire a Southwestern feel and choose tones that are warm, open, and inviting. No matter the personality a person wants his or her home to possess, color can create it.

One of the most popular colors to decorate with is brown. Brown can really warm up a large space and set an atmosphere of “hominess”. People often love brown shades because they are rich and earthy. Brown tones can encompass anything from beige to dark, rich mahogany. Rose, yellow, orange, and red are the shades that comprise the color brown. Numerous shades can be used as accents to brown tones. Some of the most popular color combinations in homes today are a lettuce or celery shade and chocolate, or coastal blue a darker nut shade. Perhaps the most wonderful thing about using brown in a color scheme is that it is so versatile and goes with many different types of décor.

Orange is a color that is becoming better known for its ability to bring a sense of happiness to a home. After all, who wouldn’t feel better by simply entering a room painted with a beautiful, captivating shade of a sunset? The brightness of orange can really create a sense of identity for a house or a family. Some accent colors that look especially great with orange are blue, turquoise, and even various shades of pink, such as watermelon.

One hue home decorators never seem to tire of is green. Green is a calm, cool color that sets a mood of relaxation, peace, and serenity. For these reasons, bedrooms are often painted shades of green. Green can range from a very pale spring green to mint, lime, avocado, hunter green, and olive. Green looks fantastic with colors such as pink, lemon, and bright lavender.

Never underestimate the power of color – it can change someone’s mood and transform an older, dingy-looking house into one fit for royalty. What moods do you want your home to evoke? Once that is determined, it will be easy to choose colors that will both beautify and enliven your house.

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/10/24/color-with-unconventional-art-schemes-including-picasso

http://www.houzz.com/articles/Color

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Color Blocking Makes for Artful Fashion

Art’s influence on fashion is practically undeniable, especially when you consider particular trends in the clothing industry. For example, color blocking is among the most popular current fashion trends. Color blocking is nothing more than art adapted to fit the human body in the form of certain clothing/color combinations.

Color blocking in fashion is simply the practice of wearing blocks of color. These colors are typically very bold and bright, and oftentimes clashing. While this may sound distasteful, it has been seen on the runway in recent fashion shows and can be quite attractive. So how does someone color block his or her clothing practically?

Guidelines for Fashionable Color Blocking

Clash on Purpose – We are told throughout our lives to wear colors that compliment one another and do not clash. With color blocking, those rules get utterly thrown out the window. When you color block, you are encouraged to wear shades that are traditionally unacceptable, such as red and pink. In fact, the more clash you can achieve with your outfit, the more fashionable you will appear.

Opt for Basic Accessories – If you are going to color block your clothing, do not do the same with your accessories. Shoes, jewelry, handbags, and the like should be restricted to neutral tones. Remember, you can’t go wrong with grey, the current top trend in neutral shades.

Be Bold – Do not shy away from bold, loud colors. Such tones are at the heart of color blocking, so let yourself be free in your choices of these shades.

Wear No More than Three Tones – One of the only unofficial restrictions you have in color blocking is the number of tones you can appropriately wear at one time. A good rule of thumb is to combine only two or three colors per outfit. That way, you will be fashionable but not overwhelming.

There is no doubt that art and fashion go hand in hand – just ask the designers who are creating this season’s array of color-blocked ensembles. Don’t be afraid to unleash your inner artist as you color block your way into late summer. What shades will you choose?

http://fashiondujourdaily.wordpress.com/2011/03/10/color-blocking-101-what-how/

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Company Uses Color to Create a Sense of Identity

The way color affects individuals is simply remarkable. Different tones can create moods, evoke emotions, and make statements. Brides understand this and often choose their wedding shades prior to making any other plans. Art therapists understand the power of color and utilize it for healing purposes. Also, nothing is as effective at setting an ambiance than color. It’s undeniable that shades and tones are forces to be reckoned with.

For J Public Relations, color has created a sense of identity as a company. JPR, a firm whose specialty is “eateries” and hotels, is truly unlike any professional office you have ever encountered. This is because it is bathed in pink. Pink walls and light fixtures, and even pink accessories and graphics grace the offices of J Public Relations. JPR’s kitchen even boasts this happy shade. This has many people asking one simple question: why pink?

Jamie Sigler Pescatello and Kim Julin Guyader, founders J Public Relations, were the brains behind the pink offices located in New York City. They chose the shade first because they favored it, and second because they believed it would make the firm distinct from competitors. Pescatello and Guyader also found the color to be “playful and powerful,” and thought it represented the firm’s personality.

When Pescatello and Guyader first visited their current office space they were less than impressed. In fact, they were downright frightened by the 3,300 square feet that used to be a law firm. The peeling wallpaper and dark color scheme of the offices almost scared the founders of JPR away, but over time they became convinced that they could create the work space they imagined. A few knocked-down walls and buckets of pink paint later, J Public Relations had offices that continue to inspire creativity in its 24 staff members (who are, by the way, all female, “though unintentionally”).

It turns out that the founders of J Public Relations had a brilliant idea when they dreamed of pink. The lovely color that has come to define JPR has attracted interviewers and is inspiring articles and blog posts. The office space of J Public Relations is an example of the amazing ability color has to create and cement a sense of identity.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/22/pink-pays-dividends-pr-office/

Note: all pictures were found on J Public Relations’ website (http://www.jpublicrelations.com/expertise/ and http://theofficestylist.com/j-public-relations/)

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