Tag Archives: primary colors

Fun Facts About Familiar Colors

Color. It defines our reality, evokes emotion, can affect our choices, and makes a difference in the way we look. All of us are familiar with the primary colors, but this post reveals some little-known facts that may surprise you.

Red:

Red is usually associated with power and passion. It is vibrant, daring, and attracts attention. For instance, think about the responses drawn by red cars and crimson lipstick.

Fun facts about red:

  • Although it’s widely believed that red capes make bulls angry, the reality is that bulls are colorblind. In this instance, the red lining is meant to conceal any bloodstains.
  • Seeing a red object can make your heart beat faster.
  • In China, brides wear red wedding dresses for good luck.
  • There are approximately 23 different shades of red crayons.

Orange:

The artist Wassily Kandinsky once said, “Orange is red brought nearer to humanity by yellow.” It’s one of those colors people love or hate. Vibrant and engaging, it is the only color of the spectrum that gets its name from an object- in this case the orange fruit.

Fun facts about orange:

  • In France, the middle traffic light is orange.
  • In Hindu tradition, orange is an auspicious and sacred color.
  • Orange is both the name and emblematic color of the British royal family.
  • The ‘black boxes’ on aircraft are really bright orange so they can be located more easily.

Yellow:

German writer and statesman Johann von Goethe said in 1840, “With yellow the eye rejoices, the heart expands, the spirit is cheered and we immediately feel warmed.’ The same holds true today: yellow is associated with optimism and enlightenment.

Fun facts about yellow:

  • Although yellow is considered a peaceful color, people lose their tempers more frequently in yellow rooms.
  • Legal pads are yellow because it improves concentration ability.
  • 75% of the pencils sold in the U.S. are yellow.
  • A yellow flag indicates a medical quarantine.

Green:

Green is not just a color anymore; it is a symbol of environmentally friendly products, buildings, and lifestyles. Green has represented growth, regeneration, and fertility since the beginning of time.

Fun facts about green:

  • People waiting to appear on TV wait in ‘green rooms’ because the color can soothe a bad case of the nerves.
  • Hospital decor is usually green because it calms patients.
  • Seamstresses won’t use green thread before a fashion show, fearing it can cause bad luck.
  • Brides in the Middle Ages wore green to represent fertility.

Blue:

Blue is one of the most popular colors. It causes the human body to produce calming chemicals, which is why it’s often used in bedrooms. Blue is also gender-neutral, appealing to both men and women equally.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Fashion consultants recommend wearing blue to job interviews because it represents loyalty.
  • Weightlifters can lift heavier weights in blue-walled gyms.
  • Workers are more productive in blue rooms.
  • Blue plates make food appear less appealing: a note to dieters!

Indigo:

We have Isaac Newton to thank for adding indigo to the color spectrum. He wanted the number of colors to match the seven-tone musical scale of Rene Descartes, so indigo was chosen to bring the color spectrum count to seven.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Black light turns ripe bananas a bright indigo color.
  • During the Elizabethan era, only royalty, nobility, and members of the Council could legally wear indigo.
  • Indigo is often called ‘royal’ blue.
  • The Virgin Mary is frequently depicted wearing indigo clothing.

Purple:

Because it appears so rarely in nature and is expensive to create, purple has a powerful history that has evolved with the centuries. It is the most powerful wavelength of the rainbow and denotes wealth and sophistication.

Fun facts about purple:

  • The Romans used to extract an essence for making purple by boiling thousands of marine snails.
  • In some cultures, purple is the color of mourning.
  • Only two of the world’s flags contain purple.
  • In Italy, performers refuse to go on stage wearing purple.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Colorful Jewelry Inspired by Classic Art

Red Artwork is Worth Fortunes

The Reason Why Barns Are Red

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Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades – What’s the Difference?

Who Creates Color TrendsLet’s face the facts: we can easily take color for granted. Even when we are enjoying the brilliant hues of nature and the masterful shades in paintings, it is hard to be fully aware of the colorful intricacies we are taking in.

Case in point: do you know the difference between hues, tints, tones and shades?

To some, it comes as a shock to learn that these colorful qualities make up multiple tiers of the color wheel.

Basic and Intricate Elements of the Color Wheel

At first glance, the color wheel is a tool that guides us in using primary, secondary and complementary colors. But it also does much more than this. It describes analogous colors (any three colors that sit side by side), split complementary colors (which considers the two colors adjacent to a complimentary hue), and tetradic colors (a group of four colors, made up of two complimentary colors).

Beyond defining aesthetic color combinations, the color wheel also offers a good starting point from which tints, tones and shades can be properly identified.

The color wheel at its most basic form is made up of 12 hues. Hues are pure colors. When white is added to hues, they lighten and become known as tints. When gray is added to hues, they dim and become known as tones. When black is added to hues, they darken and become shades.

This excellent image, compliments of lifehacker.com, shows the many levels of the color wheel:

Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good

Using Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades

Different tiers of the color wheel come in handy when decorating, designing graphics, deciding on outfits or preparing works of art. For instance, matching a hue with its complementary shade can make for a dynamic combination. Sometimes, people find hues to be strong and bold. They may prefer light, more whimsical tints or are drawn to the calmer depths of shades.

More so, it can be nice to use one hue and its tints, shades and tones. This creates a monotone chromatic color scheme. In the same vein, a monotone achromatic color scheme uses all variations of neutral colors and can be brought to life with a brilliant hue.

Did you know the color wheel was so intricate? To learn more about the differences between hues, tints, tones and shades, as well as learn how to pick the best looking combinations for your wardrobe, home décors and art projects, check out this blog post: http://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-color-theory-to-know-what-looks-goo-1608972072.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel, but the most important thing to know is it won’t steer you wrong.

Read more Segmation blog posts about color theory:

Basic Color Theory – Color Matters

Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

How Well Do You Know The Color Wheel?

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How Well Do You Know The Color Wheel?

theory-wheels-3-6-12The color wheel is a tool used to identify relationships between colors. Also known as a color circle, the most popular organization of this artistic device includes primary, secondary, and tertiary colors.

Not only is the color wheel useful, it can also be fun. An interactive game created by Method of Action, an educational website for creative quizzes and peer feedback, allows individuals to test themselves on 6 elements of the color wheel.

The Most Popular Color Wheel

It is likely that you have seen a color wheel with 12 divisions, consisting of three primary colors, three secondary colors, and six intermediate (or tertiary) colors.

By using the test at http://color.method.ac/, you can explore how well you know color hues and saturation, in addition to complementary, analogous, triadic, and tetradic color combinations.

To best understand the results of your color wheel test, read more about what these terms represent.

6 Elements of the Color Wheel

               Hue is the main property of color. The common term stands for “pure color”. This means there is no black or white pigments added to give the color a tinted or shaded effect. Some unique hues include red, green, blue, and yellow.

               Saturation represents the brightness of a unique color. Often times, a color will become brighter when white pigments are added and dull when black is incorporated. This is how shades of a color are created. In addition, saturation brings about terms like, “light blue” and “dark blue”.

               Complementary colors exist opposite one another on the color wheel. It is said that putting complementary colors together can energize a color scheme. This is because there is a high contrast between colors like blue and orange, or red and green.

               Analogous colors sit adjacent, or next to one another, on a color wheel. These groupings are said to be “pleasing to the eye” and are often found together in nature. To create an analogous grouping within a color scheme it is important to have a hue be the main color.

               Triadic colors are schemes created by three colors that are spaced equally on the wheel. An example of a triadic color combination is red, blue, and green; between each color are two colors not included in the grouping.

               Tetradic color schemes are made up of four colors rather than three. These combinations are made of a primary color mixed with the secondary color placed next to it. Yellow-orange or blue-green may be seen in tetradic schemes.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel. To know more, read the other posts Segmation has published about the color wheel. They are listed below.

Also, be sure to head over to http://color.method.ac/ and take the color wheel test. When you are done, come back to this blog and share your results by leaving a reply on this post. We look forward to seeing how well you know the color wheel.

Sources: 

http://www.theverge.com/2012/1/24/2730597/method-of-action-color-game

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/01/test-your-color-matching-skills-quiz_n_2388079.html

More Segmation blog posts about the Color Wheel:

– Color Theory Basics: Color Combinations

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/02/27/color-theory-basics-color-combinations/

– Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/color-theory-basics-the-color-wheel-2/

– Introduction to Color Expert Johannes Itten

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/introduction-to-color-expert-johannes-itten/

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All About Yellow Pigments www.segmation.com

Yellow is one of the three primary colors, which means it is often used in painting – from capturing the warm rays of a golden sun, to a field full of sunflowers, to the flickering flames of fire. Here is an overview of some of the most common yellow pigments you’ll use when painting:

Yellow Ochre (sometimes called Mars Yellow) is a non-toxic natural clay pigment. In fact, it is one of the oldest pigments in the world, used by our prehistoric ancestors. Yellow Ochre has a tan, sandy appearance.

Naples Yellow was once made from toxic synthetic pigments that were used abundantly by the Old Masters, but today’s version is made from modern, non-toxic substances. Naples Yellow usually has a light, pale appearance.

Cadmium Yellow is another historically toxic pigment (Cadmium Sulfide) that was used by artists in the late 19th century. It now contains a non-toxic replacement (usually Azo pigments), but is still called Cadmium Yellow. Cadmium Yellow has a very bright yellow appearance.

Azo Yellow (also called Hansa Yellow) is a dye-based synthetic pigment invented in the early 20th century. Azo Yellow is usually bright but it is also pale and translucent compared to Cadmium Yellow.

Each of these yellow pigments adds something different to your palette. If you are painting a still life, landscape or portrait that requires the use of yellow, consider the different properties of these yellows to decide which one (or more) would work best for what you need.

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