Tag Archives: Pattern

Be My Valentine

SegPlayPC_VALBanner.jpg

Segmation’s SegPlayPC Be My Valentine pattern collection is a fun, off-beat set of great colorful digital patterns. We know you’ll enjoy coloring these great patterns! What a great stress reliever as well.

Gorgeous art painting patterns to color and relax with. You don’t have to be a professional artist to enjoy this. Join the fun today! Segmation dot com

Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the world on February 14th. It’s a magical day where lovers express their love for one another in many traditional and untraditional ways. In today’s time, candy, chocolates, flowers, and heart filled cards are usually given as gifts in many cultures around the globe. Segmation’s SegPlay PC Valentine themed patterns includes many illustrated graphics of the holiday including roses, candy, cupids with arrows, dragons and puppies in love, and couples in love. Happy Valentine’s Day to all!

You can find a wide collection of Be my Valentine Scenes paint by number patterns and is available at the Segmation web site. These patterns may be viewed, painted, and printed using SegPlay™PC a fun, computerized paint-by-numbers program for Windows 7, 2000, XP, and Vista. Enjoy!

SegPlayPC_VALthumbstrip.jpg

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, we’re sure you’ll like:

  • Can You Be Taught to Read in Color?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/can-you-be-taught-read-in-color/

  • What Color Should You Paint Your Home?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/12/21/what-color-should-you-paint-your-home/

  • United States Presidents Were Skilled Musicians

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/01/22/united-states-presidents-were-skilled-musicians/

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Create Beautiful Wintertime Memories by Building a Snowman

http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=SNM

2013 is finally upon us, and accompanying it is the harsh reality of winter. Freezing temperatures, frosty car windows, and chilly houses are all aspects of wintertime. Despite its troubles, winter is a favored time of year. After all, there is much good that can be done with snow, the plentiful resource that winter provides us with. Just one of the many wintertime activities that can be enjoyed when snow is abundant is traditional snowman making.

Making the perfect snowman ranks high on the list of pleasurable winter activities and is perhaps equal to none. How can one make the “perfect” snowman? It’s easier than you might think. Here are just a few tips and tricks for building a memorable, snowy friend:

1. Find your snow — First, you will want to find the right type of snow. The snow you want will be fluffy, not too watery, and at least a couple inches deep. Make sure that the snow packs together fairly easily.

2. Locate a building area — Find a relatively flat area on which to build your snowman.

3. Begin building – Build your snowman by shaping the base mound of snow into a large ball. You can accomplish this by shaping a smaller snow ball with your hands and then rolling it along the snow-covered ground, which will cause it to enlarge. Top that with another ball of snow that’s a bit smaller. Finally, add an even smaller ball of snow to the very top (this will serve as the head).

4. Decorate – After your snowman is built, complete it by adding a carrot nose, a couple of lumps of coal for eyes, and a row of buttons or pebbles for a mouth. Don’t forget to throw a scarf around your snowman’s neck!

Find more snowman building tips at http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Snowman.

After your snowman is built, why not host a snowman competition for your neighborhood? Talk SNM020thumbto some other parents in town and appoint a couple of judges. Have neighborhood children build snowmen; later, serve hot chocolate and refreshments for them to enjoy as the judges choose the best snowman on the street. That would surely be a cherished memory for many families!

If you love building snowmen, imagine how much you would love creating them in artwork. Segmation offers a snowman pattern set that features all different kinds of wintry scenes. Check out Segmation’s snowman pattern by visiting http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=SNM.

Coming soon: You won’t want to miss Segmation’s upcoming blog post about presidents and their artistic abilities. It may really surprise you to learn which of America’s leaders were also leaders in the arts, so stay tuned!

If you enjoyed this Segmation post, you’ll especially like:

Will Artspace Become the World’s Next Major Online Marketplace?https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/12/27/will-artspace-become-worlds-next-major-online-marketplace/

Photography Returns to Its Rootshttps://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/photography-returns-to-its-roots/

Quickest, Coolest, and Fastest Way to Paint by Numbershttps://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/10/25/quickest-coolest-and-fastest-way-to-paint-by-numbers/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

http://www.segmation.com

“Paint by Number” Kits Create Thousands of Artists

To be considered an artist, must someone necessarily conceive of the subject of their artwork in their own mind, or is it acceptable for them to use a “blueprint” provided by another artist? Dan Robbins, the designer of “paint by number” art kits, would agree that individuals can indeed use patterns to assist them in art making and still be accepted as legitimate artists.

Dan Robbins designed paint by number, a product that allows people to paint pictures according to set patterns, in the 1950s. Max Klein, who was the president of the Palmer Paint Company, sought Robbins out as the designer of the yet-to-be discovered product that would later be known as paint by number. Robbins was admonished by Klein to conceive of and design a product that could help anyone become an artist.

Robbins looked to Leonardo da Vinci for inspiration in his endeavor to create a phenomenal art product. (This is because Da Vinci was known to supply his apprentices with “numbered patterns” on which to paint.) Robbins wondered why the same principle Da Vinci applied to his apprentices wouldn’t work for modern art enthusiasts and soon began developing paint by number kits.

Not long after paint by number was developed and marketed, kits began to sell in droves as Americans became addicted to the product that enabled them to make beautiful, intricate paintings. Robbins created even more kits and trained paint by number designers (Adam Grant was one such designer). Today, Dan Robbins’ art “has been displayed on more walls than that of any other artist.” To say that paint by number kits made Dan Robbins a success is an understatement.

Paint by number has been supplying art enthusiasts with art “blueprints,” so to speak, for decades. As a result, thousands of individuals having dormant artistic skills have blossomed into artists. This has made paint by number somewhat of an American legend, and has afforded many individuals cherished memories and increased artistic ability.

How much do you enjoy paint by number and Segmation? Whether you love crafting perfect paintings, creating great digital art, or have fond childhood memories of coloring inside the lines, your experience is unique. We want to hear your story in the comment section below. What does paint by number mean to you?

Sources:

http://www.paintbynumbermuseum.com/dan_robbins_intro

Coming Soon: Read Segmation’s exclusive article about William L. Bird, a historian and curator at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where in 2001 he organized an exhibition on paint by numbers on which his book is based.

If you like this Segmation Blog, you may also like:

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Candy Art: We Don’t all Have to be Artists to Create Art!

Being creative is part of being human. We naturally involve ourselves on a daily basis with the work of creating. From building a snowman in the back yard, to choosing the throw pillows to accessorize a room, humans are in the habit of being artistic.

Artwork comes in all forms. It is easy to believe that art revolves around those who have mastered technical painting techniques or individuals who can create realistic figures out of stone. However, art is far more present in our everyday lives. One never knows when they will be struck with an urge to be artistic or be driven by a desire to create.

Hannah Mendelsohn from Juneau, Alaska doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist. However, her creations are receiving widespread attention from many fans. She doesn’t paint nor does she sculpt. Instead, Hannah Mendelsohn uses something you might have in your kitchen cabinet right this moment: M&Ms!

 Image courtesy of http://candyaddict.com/blog/2007/12/06/alaska-coffee-table-serves-as-canvas-for-mm-art/

Mendelsohn, 21, is a medical assistant by day and a candy artist by night. M&M’s are her medium for artistic expression and the patterns she creates are mind-boggling and stunning. She begins by separating the M&Ms by color into gallon size freezer bags and then she sits down to create a pattern.

Interestingly, Mendelsohn says that she doesn’t ever have an exact pattern or plan in mind when she sits down to create. Yet, as indicated by the image above, her patterns are reminiscent of beadwork and display the attention to detail found in needle work. Mendelsohn invests several evening hours a week to her M&M creations, which is to say that her designs are no small feat.

Hannah Mendelsohn has no desire to become a full time candy artist. She is sticking to her dream of becoming a nurse. However, there is a lesson to be learned from this woman’s desire to create. No matter whom you are or what you do for a living, you can still be artistic. You can still create.

For Hannah Mendelsohn the therapeutic practice of arranging M&Ms into patters has generated some stunning creations. This idle pastime, plus a little hard work and determination, has placed her in the exciting world of candy art.

Ideas to Turn Your Candy into Art

1). If you have children, using candy can be a great introduction to the world of art and creativity. While learning their colors and understanding patterns your children are learning how to express themselves creatively and artistically.

2). Use the sweets in your kitchen cabinet to spruce up your home! No matter what season it is or which holiday is coming up, a homemade candy center piece can be a festive and fun addition to a room.

3). Photographing your candy art is also a creative and often eye pleasing endeavor. Candy offers a variety of color options and how you choose to arrange these colors can produce interesting photography projects.

4). Don’t be afraid to let yourself be creative

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

Optical Illusions Create Art and Provoke Thought

Art is subjective. Individuals find themselves attracted to a certain artist, style, or theme when looking for art to inspire positive thought and decor. Upon finding the piece they consider, “just right,” one may seek to understand more about the particular picture or genre of art. However, they contrive their thoughts from a combination of what they already know, research, and see with their own two eyes.

In the early 1900’s this thought process was used to develop a new kind of art — completely subjective in form. It received the title, “op-art,” or optical art. This fresh form of art, not seen before the 20th century, used paint to create an interaction between a lively illusion and a picture plane, which is the flat canvas. Much of the art first produced in this genre (and some of the better known pieces) use only black and white paint or ink. As the art form expanded throughout the century, other elements of color and design were added.

This genre quickly evolved but remained true to its core: op-art is a perceptual experience that derives from manipulating typical visual functions. By painting an illusion onto a flat canvas there is a juxtaposition between what the eye expects to see and what it actually takes in. This is known as the figure-ground relationship.

Such a relationship exists because of edge assessment. For instance, when the boarderlines of one shape can be applied to both the outside of the shape and inside of another, an illusion is created. When placing this illusion on a flat, two-dimensional material, like a canvas, a human’s eye is especially baffled and the individual is likely to see the painting from more than one perspective.

But not all optical illusions are works of art. When an artist strives to deliberately challenge an observer’s eye with this figure-ground relationship, op-art is the goal in mind. In fact, the foundational elements of creating an artistic illusion are simple lines and patterns. With the use of color, op-art expanded because it used certain colors to change how the retina perceived an overall image.

This did not happen until the mid 1900’s, even though many artists trained in the op-art technique showed interest in applying color to their contrasting figure-ground paintings much earlier. Artists like Josef Albers, Bridget Riley, and  Julian Stanczak were eager to implement this element. Some time after color was introduced to op-art, photographers also became determined to produce op-art, in black and white, and in color photographs.

Op-art photography became popular in the 1970’s. However, this form of digital manipulation (that became easier with technological developments) lacked the foundational elements most important to op-art: Lines and patterns. For quite some time there was not enough subject matter for photographers to produce artistic illusions; lines and patterns were much easier to paint than capture.

This simplicity is what makes op-art a stroke of genius. It cannot be overlooked that the founders of this art, German artists who studied constructivist philosophy, believed thought provoking art could positively influence society. At the school of Bauhaus, where op-art first originated, great thinkers like Josef Albers developed a new way of seeing the world; by looking on both sides of the same line.

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

European Flags


Europe is one of the world’s seven continents with a population of 731 million. Its border is somewhat arbitrary, defined by convention, historical references, cultural and political elements. There are 50 internationally recognized European sovereign states which we have included in our European Flag sets. These colorful and graphic flags contain coats of arms, shields, crosses, maps, animals, buildings, artwork, stars, stripes, and other symbols of which interpretations have historical and symbolic meanings.

This set contains 50 paintable patterns.

Segmation
Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!
Free Trial Downloads for Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

Saint Patrick’s Day www.segmation.com

Saint Patrick’s Day Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC released (see more details here)

Saint Patrick’s Day is originally a Catholic holiday which is celebrated annually on March 17. The day has evolved to become a secular celebration of Irish culture. Saint Patrick was a real person who joined the Church in Britain around the year 432, and among other legends, used the shamrock to teach the Christine doctrine of the Trinity to the Irish people. Today many participate in this event by wearing green clothing and other items. Our pattern set contains many elements of this holiday including leprechauns, pots of gold, rainbows, clovers, large green hats, and of course drinking green beer.

This set contains over 21 paintable patterns.

Saint Patrick’s Day

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!
Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Saint Patrick’s Day from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com