Tag Archives: Holiday

Saint Patrick’s Day Celebrations throughout the Years

Saint Patrick’s Day is a cause for celebration. People throughout North America, Ireland and other parts of the world honor this holiday. They wear green, visit pubs and host parties with friends and family. But how many of us know who Saint Patrick is and how this holiday came to be?

The historical significance of March 17 may surprise you.

The Patron Saint of Ireland

March 17, now a day of celebration, signifies a sorrowful event. It is believed that Saint Patrick died on this day sometime in the fifth century. Not long after his death, Irishman began observing this day as a holiday as a “Feast Day.”

Saint Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. He was born in Roman Britain and was taken to Ireland as a slave at the age of 16. After escaping, he returned to Ireland as a free man and missionary. He is known and remembered for spreading Christianity throughout Ireland.

Celebrations throughout the Years

People of Ireland have recognized March 17 as a day to celebrate Saint Patrick for the past 1,000 years. During this time, Irishmen honored Saint Patrick with a “feast day.” Ironically enough the tradition of “St. Patty’s Parties,” as we know them today, began in the United States.

It is said that Irishmen serving in the English military first marched the streets of New York City on March 17, 1762. This allowed them to feel connected to their culture while away overseas. At this time, however, it could not be predicted that the number of immigrants would soon surge. In less than a century the Great Potato Famine would hit, forcing many families to flee to America in search of jobs and sustenance. By the early 20th century, it was common to see many different nationalities present in American enfolded into Saint Patrick’s Day celebrations.

Holiday Traditions

Today, Saint Patrick’s day is celebrated throughout many parts of the world, including the United States, Canada and Australia. US megacity Chicago goes all out by dying their river green.

It is said that American celebrations influenced Ireland’s holiday traditions. Before the 1970s pubs were closed throughout Ireland on March 17. It is said that American celebrations influenced Ireland’s holiday traditions. In fact, before the 1970’s pubs were closed throughout Ireland on March 17. However, in recent years government began recognizing how the international holiday increases tourism; they decided to keep bars open so Irish culture could be on display for all to see.

Now, about one million people celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day festival in Dublin ever year. With parades, concerts and fireworks it is somewhat reminiscent of the United States’ Fourth of July. For Ireland, it is one of the largest national holidays. Saint Patrick gives Ireland and all the world reason to celebrate.

Read more Segmation blog posts about the color green: 

Have a Fun Saint Patrick’s Day!

Green Represents Saint Patrick’s Day

Saint Patrick’s Day www.segmation.com

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Norman Rockwell’s Artwork Inspired by the Christmas Holiday

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Christmas is a holiday that is special to hundreds of thousands of individuals around the world. This holiday is celebrated in many different countries with numerous traditions. Time with family, gifts under the Christmas tree, and contemplation of the important things in life are hallmarks of this wonderful time of year. What is your favorite aspect of Christmas?

Throughout history many artists have been inspired by the Christmas season to create seasonally themed works of art — Norman Rockwell is one of those individuals. Perhaps more so than any other American artist, Norman Rockwell truly was a master at capturing the spirit of Christmas in his art. As ABC news states it, “Norman Rockwell and the Christmas holiday had a deep and lasting relationship.”

Normal Rockwell was born in New York City on February 3, 1894. He was a student at the New York School of Art. Interestingly, Rockwell’s first commissioned art was for Christmas cards when he was only 15 years old. The Christmas card art was just the beginning of the American artist’s journey into holiday themed artwork.

An issue of the Saturday Evening Post that was released on December 25, 1948, featured one of Norman Rockwell’s famed Christmas pictures known as “Christmas Homecoming”.  The image displays over a dozen individuals standing in front of a Christmas tree; two of the people in the image are embracing enthusiastically. While there are “minimal references to Christmas” in this picture, the season is still somehow clearly represented.

Another of Rockwell’s Christmas themed pieces of art is titled “Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas”. The Unknownoilpainting was finished in 1967, 10 years after it was begun. It was painted for McCall’s magazine and displays a quaint, picturesque street that is lined by snow-covered automobiles, a church, and other buildings. This image is just another example of the amazing way Norman Rockwell captured the Christmas holiday in his artwork.

Make this Christmas season more memorable by creating your own seasonally themed works of art. Segmation offers a SegPlayPC Christmas pattern “paint-by-numbers” collection that makes it easy and fast to uniquely celebrate your favorite time of year. Learn more about Segmation’s Christmas pattern collection by visiting http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternsets.asp#CHR

Sources:

http://www.arthistory.net/artists/normanrockwell/normanrockwell1.html

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/slideshow?id=9321605

Coming soon: Thinking about re-painting the exterior of your home? If so, you won’t want to miss our next post!

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The Stories Behind Holiday Colors

http://sierraclub.typepad.com/greenlife/2009/12/emphasizing-the-green-in-kwanzaa.html

December is here, and that means individuals all around the world will be celebrating holidays like Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa, just to name a few. The December season is a favored time of year that is associated with excellent food, gifts, and time spent with family. Not only that, holiday seasons are often represented by unique, symbolic colors. Have you ever wondered why certain colors are designated to different holiday seasons? Let’s find out…

What do Kwanzaa’s shades symbolize?

Kwanzaa, established in 1966, is one of the most recent holidays to be founded. The colors used in Kwanzaa celebrations are red, black, and yellow. Related to Kwanzaa, green stands for “the land of Africa and hope for the future.” Red symbolizes the blood of Africans who have passed away, whereas black represents the skin shade of Africans. Kwanzaa, which is a holiday that honors African-American culture, centers on creativity, faith, self-determination, and togetherness.

Blue and white are significant to Jewish culture.

 Most people are aware of the fact that the blue and white shades represented in Hanukkah décor are the colors of the Israeli flag. But what do these shades symbolize? According to a rabbinical interpretation, blue represents divine revelation as well as heaven. Better than any other color, white symbolizes cleanliness and purity. These colors that are so prominent in the design of the Israeli flag are also displayed on the Jewish prayer shawl (tallit), making them an integral part of Jewish culture.

Why red and green for Christmas?

The famed shades for Christmas are, without a doubt, green and red. But what do these colors represent? Green is representative of the evergreen tree, which symbolizes eternal life and the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Red may represent the blood of Christ, but researchers are unsure of the exact symbolic meaning of this shade. What they do know, though, is that the combination of red and green likely stems from holly Christmas decorations that were used in Europe in the Middle Ages.

Make this Holiday season more memorable by creating your own seasonally themed works of art. Segmation offers a SegPlayPC Christmas Time pattern “paint-by-numbers” collection that makes it easy and fast to enjoy the Christmas Time celebration and more. Learn more about Segmation’s Christmas Time pattern collection by visiting http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternsets.asp#CHR.

Sources:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/what-color-is-your-holiday-chr-104238

Coming Soon: Read Segmation’s exclusive article about the season that inspired so much of famed artist Norman Rockwell’s timeless works.

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Thanksgiving Holiday Inspires Art Work

Each year on the fourth Thursday of November, a very special North American holiday takes place, and that holiday is Thanksgiving. The Thanksgiving season is known throughout the country as a time to delight in the presence of loved ones and enjoy a plethora of delicious food. A favorite holiday of many Americans, Thanksgiving inspires décor, recipes, movies, and even art.

Thanksgiving dates back to 1621, when it is assumed the first Thanksgiving took place at Plymouth. This early event was a celebration of an abundant harvest. Numerous artists throughout history have attempted to capture the imagined scenes from the first Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving has been the subject of many pieces of fine art for centuries. Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, “American painter and illustrator of Americana,” painted several Thanksgiving-themed scenes, including The First Thanksgiving (1915), The Mayflower Compact (1925), The Return of Miles Standish (1920), The Return of the Mayflower (1907), and The First Sermon Ashore (1921). Although The First Thanksgiving is said to be inaccurate in some of its representations, it gives us an idea of what the actual scene might have looked like so long ago.

Ferris was not the only individual whose art was influenced by Thanksgiving  – Charles Lucy, George Henry Boughton, Henry A. Bacon, Henry Sargent, and Edward Percy Moran also found inspiration in this holiday. Jennie Augusta Brownscombe painted a particularly iconic work titled The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth (1914). This painting has “become a symbol of the holiday for many Americans.”

The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth was executed by Brownscombe during the Colonial Revival Period. It is a tranquil, believable depiction of that first holiday that would come to mean so much to so many. This is an example of how art can help us imagine a significant historical event, deepening the overall meaning of it.

Make this Thanksgiving more memorable by creating your own seasonally-themed works of art. Segmation offers a SegPlayPC Thanksgiving pattern “paint-by-numbers” collection that makes it easy and fast to uniquely celebrate the holiday. The collection includes patterns of pumpkins, turkeys, cornucopias, pilgrims, etc., providing you a foolproof way to create scenes of your favorite aspects of Thanksgiving. Learn more about Segmation’s Thanksgiving pattern collection by visiting http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=THG.

http://www.joyfulheart.com/thanksgiving/pilgrim_artwork.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Leon_Gerome_Ferris

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/hpbrowns.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

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Saint Patrick’s Day Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC released (see more details here)

Saint Patrick’s Day is originally a Catholic holiday which is celebrated annually on March 17. The day has evolved to become a secular celebration of Irish culture. Saint Patrick was a real person who joined the Church in Britain around the year 432, and among other legends, used the shamrock to teach the Christine doctrine of the Trinity to the Irish people. Today many participate in this event by wearing green clothing and other items. Our pattern set contains many elements of this holiday including leprechauns, pots of gold, rainbows, clovers, large green hats, and of course drinking green beer.

This set contains over 21 paintable patterns.

Saint Patrick’s Day

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Take a Painting Holiday

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Lavender fields of Provence… Rolling hills in Tuscany… These are landscapes that have inspired artists throughout the centuries. If you’ve ever dreamed of standing in a wheat field with an easel and capturing the golden hues of a country sunset like van Gogh, or painting an explosion of red poppies spread across a peaceful pasture like Monet, then you can follow in the footsteps of your favorite artists by treating yourself to a painting holiday.

Painting holidays are growing in popularity amongst professional artists and Sunday painters alike. They offer the unique opportunity to travel, create art, and immerse yourself in a foreign culture. Painting holidays are the perfect opportunity to get away from the hustle and bustle of your everyday life and rejuvenate your passion for making art, all under the professional supervision of an instructor.

A painting holiday not only provides you with the time and space for making art – it also provides countless other benefits as well: experiencing other cultures, socializing with other artists, and receiving teacher supervision and support. Your hosts will be knowledgeable about the area and usually take you on outings to the market and to cafe and restaurants, so that you can get a taste for local life.

Most people go on organized painting holidays so they can be part of a group and interact with others. More independently-minded artists and travelers can also choose to create their own painting holidays. Some art centers in France and Italy offer self-directed artist retreats, where for a fee you receive room and board as well as studio space.

Although the most popular painting holidays take place in the French or Italian countryside, you can find painting holidays in nearly every country in the world, from England to Kenya. If you get tired of painting alone in your studio, consider taking a painting holiday!