Tag Archives: graphic design

Is a Career in Art for you?

 

Is a Career in Art for you? http://www.segmation.wordpress.com

What do you want to be when you grow up? Many kids are asked this question. At the start of a school year, when optimism is fresh and hopes are high, children set goals and claim their dream jobs. This doesn’t pertain exclusively to children though; many adults reflect on their childhood dreams as well. Like young souls, adults can also be found wondering and exploring what it takes to pursue a career in art.

      • Did you dream about becoming an artist?
      • Do you support your child’s dreams of having a career in art?

When a child’s artwork decorates a refrigerator, it is hard to imagine how carefree creativity will earn him or her a comfortable living. All too often, many parents believe artistic endeavors only lead to poor career paths. However, there are plenty of stable, high earning jobs– like architecture, interior design, and graphic design – that require creativity and artistic talent.

Architecture

Curious children love to build and create. They are fascinated by how items work and fit together. If a child is inclined to building creative pieces of artwork, architecture may be a great career to pursue. Support this natural talent by giving him or her toys like Legos, clay, and miniature models.

Interior Design

Interior design may be a future career for a child who has a knack for arranging colors, is fascinated by textures, and comes up with unique art combinations. It requires these interests and is necessary in many different forms. There are competitive careers in home décor, office design, bathroom remodeling, and more.

Graphic Designer

Growing up in a technological world may raise a generation of children who use visual designs to communicate. Graphic design is used to sell products, inform the public, and inspire viewers. Many fields require artistic talent for graphic design. This is a great career because there are many ways to make money.

It is never too early to prepare for the future. Supporting a child’s artistic dreams may encourage the little one to thrive in academic studies and extracurricular activities. It may also infuse a parent’s life with revived passion. For anyone feeling this urge, know that it is never too late (or too early) to pursue a career in art.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Fresh Art:

Welcome Spring with a Freshly Painted Front Door

The Color Green: Many Shades, Many Meanings

Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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Pursuing a Career in Art

Pursuing a Career in ArtWhat do you want to be when you grow up? Many kids are asked this question. At the start of a school year, when optimism is fresh and hopes are high, children set goals and claim their dream jobs. This doesn’t pertain exclusively to children though; many adults reflect on their childhood dreams as well. Like young souls, adults can also be found wondering and exploring what it takes to pursue a career in art.

      • Did you dream about becoming an artist?
      • Do you support your child’s dreams of having a career in art?

When a child’s artwork decorates a refrigerator, it is hard to imagine how carefree creativity will earn him or her a comfortable living. All too often, many parents believe artistic endeavors only lead to poor career paths. However, there are plenty of stable, high earning jobs– like architecture, interior design, and graphic design – that require creativity and artistic talent.

Architecture

Curious children love to build and create. They are fascinated by how items work and fit together. If a child is inclined to building creative pieces of artwork, architecture may be a great career to pursue. Support this natural talent by giving him or her toys like Legos, clay, and miniature models.

Interior Design

Interior design may be a future career for a child who has a knack for arranging colors, is fascinated by textures, and comes up with unique art combinations. It requires these interests and is necessary in many different forms. There are competitive careers in home décor, office design, bathroom remodeling, and more.

Graphic Designer

Growing up in a technological world may raise a generation of children who use visual designs to communicate. Graphic design is used to sell products, inform the public, and inspire viewers. Many fields require artistic talent for graphic design. This is a great career because there are many ways to make money.

It is never too early to prepare for the future. Supporting a child’s artistic dreams may encourage the little one to thrive in academic studies and extracurricular activities. It may also infuse a parent’s life with revived passion. For anyone feeling this urge, know that it is never too late (or too early) to pursue a career in art.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Careers in Art:

Use Color to Change Employees’ Job Performance

Selling Your Art in a Strained Economy

Office Paint Colors and Effective Employees

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Bauhaus Art School

Are you impressed to learn about the invention of Op-Art?

The modern art style, best associated with the art and theory of Josef Albers, influenced an artistic evolution throughout the 20th century, and continues to impact the 21st century as well.

But did you know that this trendy new art form started in Germany in the early 1900’s? Even more, it was created and taught at a school that was also a forerunner for architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography.

The famous school of art, called Bauhaus, existed in three different parts of Germany between the years of 1919 and 1933. This seems like a short period of time to have such a strong influence on the world. However, the principal thoughts and practices that encouraged artists at Bauhaus traveled with them and spread throughout the world when many of the practicing students and teachers had to emigrate during Nazi control.

The Bauhaus art school was known as a “House of Construction” or a “School of Building.” Even though studies in architecture were not implemented until later, the school built its values on the idea that creating a “total” work of art incorporates multiple elements of art.

A good example of this is optical art’s use of three types of elements: optical illusions, canvas painting, and color. Perhaps it was this concept of completeness that catapulted the Bauhaus style into success, becoming one of the most influential styles in modern art, design and architecture.

Another thought that contributed to the success of Bauhaus was the founding philosophical principle of constructivism. This term originated in Russia and commonly associated with the idea that art could contribute to a better society. With major political and economic shifts happening all over the world, especially in Europe, people learned they could express themselves and propel a positive message with art. Even though there was a negative atmosphere in the world during the time of World War I and leading up to World War II, individual artists knew that art had the power to carry the significant message of peace.

In a war-torn society, Bauhaus school had much to teach. Here are some common art forms that excelled and were mastered by artists at the school between 1919 and 1933:

  • Woodworking
  • Cabinetmaking
  • Work with Metal
  • Ceramics
  • Weaving
  • Printing and typography
  • Theater
  • Drawing
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Architecture
Bauhaus art school existed at a poignant time in history. It’s location in the world and foundational European thought are two of the many reasons why it is still a reputable resource for art history today. The other reasons are artists, styles and creations that were consistently produced by the school. These are the pieces that influence modern art today, and will continue to do so evermore.