Tag Archives: da Vinci

Outside the Lines: Art Trivia Segmation

The Expressive Vincent van Gogh

The Expressive Vincent van Gogh

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(1) Which Painter was a laborer in the Panama Canal?
(a) Vincent Van Gogh
(b) Charles Laval
(c) Paul Gaugin
(d) Emile Bernard

 
(2) English artist Andy Brown created a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by stitching what together?
(a) Old napkins
(b) 1,000 used tea bags
(c) Strands of colored yarn
(d) Scraps of paper

 
(3) Which country published the first illustrated children’s book in 1658?
(a) France
(b) England
(c) Japan
(d) Germany

 
(4) What was the building that is now famously known as the Louvre Museum and Art Gallery used for in 1190?
(a) A fortress
(b) A library
(c) A Justice Building
(d) A prison

 
(5) Whose painting, titled Impressions Sunrise, gave the Impressionistic style its name?
(a) Eugene Delacroix
(b) Edouard Manet
(c) Gustave Courbet
(d) Claude Monet

Answers found at the end.

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Answers: (1) c) Paul Gaugin (2) b) 1,000 used tea bags (3) d) Germany (4) a) A fortress (5) d) Claude Monet

Discover the Artist in You

When did you discover the artist in you? Was it the first time you held a paint brush? Or the time you received praise for an art project?

Whenever it was, Segmation wants to know because Segmation allows artists of all kinds to reach their fullest potential.

Discovering the artist in you and encouraging art in others is important because art is an integral part of culture. As an individual, it showcases who you are, where you’ve come from and what you represent. Not to mention, your creativity spurs creativity in other people, allowing all forms of art to expand.

Here are some tips to discover the artist in you and encourage art in others:

(1) Practice Art
(c) See-ming Lee: Flickr

No matter what area of art you excel in, if you follow the motto, “Practice makes perfect,” your art will thrive. Set aside time to practice art every day or a couple of times per week. Whether you paint, draw, photograph or practice other types of art, make sure to do so on a regular basis. In addition to practicing your preferred art, incorporate fun, leisure artistic activities into your routine. Noticeable improvement will ensue.

(2) Study Art

(c) Michael Caven: Flickr

What are the famous works of art that influence your style and culture? Are artists like Chagall, Monet, and Da Vinci on your list of inspirational artists? When is the last time you visited an art museum? Thanks to Google Search, you don’t need to go far to acquire information about your favorite artists. Set aside time every week to discover more about important artist who influence you and those around you.

(3) Look for Art

(c) Mike Baird: Flickr

Art is all around us. In fact, it is in everyday objects. When taking a moment to observe art in nature, architecture and even table-leg carvings, you gain perspective. This infuses your art with unique qualities! So look for subtle, and often times unintentional art that surrounds you and use it for inspiration.

Another way to discover the artist in you is to be active in artist communities. These communities are available in person and online. Segmation is an online community that encourages artists to reach their fullest potential. Share your art experience with us, and as a result, share and inspire a community of artists.

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How Works of Art Become Famous

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Have you ever wondered why certain works of art are so famous? For instance, why does the Mona Lisa enjoy celebrity status, even though there have been scores of other well-painted portraits throughout history?

Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is currently known as the most famous painting in the world, but in previous centuries, it was merely regarded as a well-executed portrait by one of the Renaissance’s greatest luminaries. It wasn’t until the 20th century that the painting skyrocketed to fame. It was stolen in 1911 and recovered in 1913 – two dramatic events that catapulted the painting into the limelight. Mechanical reproduction and commercialism further propelled the fame of the painting, with the image being sold on various types of merchandise as well as appearing in countless advertisements. By now, the Mona Lisa’s fame is self-perpetuating and her legend is well-established.

The Venus de Milo is another example of a work of art that became famous not just for its beauty. Although it is one of only a few extant sculptures from the Classical period, the Venus de Milo enjoys its particular fame due to the massive propaganda efforts put forth by the French in the early 19th century, in an attempt to proclaim that their Venus was a better work of art than an Italian version of the Goddess.

The relative fame of an artwork depends on far more than just skill or execution; factors such as the timing and location of the piece, the social and political atmosphere of when it was created, and the artist’s ability to create an emotional resonance between the artwork and the viewers all play a part in why some artworks are more coveted than others. In the end, a healthy dose of fate, luck or chance doesn’t hurt, either.