Category Archives: Valentine’s Day

Red Artwork is Worth Fortunes

 

The color red is loud. It makes statements and sends signals. But the impact it has on the world of contemporary art goes beyond trendsetting. People are trading their fortunes for predominately red artwork.

At a recent auction, Sotheby’s in London recognized a shocking trend: five of the six highest-selling masterpieces were mostly red.

Forbes contributor Danielle Rahm points out that this sale took place right before Valentine’s Day. However, it is hard to believe the romantic holiday could drum up the prices of red artwork to nearly 30 million dollars.

Alex Brancik head of Contemporary Art for Sotheby’s in London sheds light on this expensive trend. “Red is a color that incites passion. It’s the color of the sunset, it’s the color of blood,” he says. “When we’re pricing things we’re aware of the power of red.”

Putting feelings of romance and passion aside, what encouraged the buyer of Sotheby’s recent high seller (Wand by Gerhard Richter) to spend 28.7 million dollars on the piece? New sales numbers show that increased value of contemporary artwork infused with the color red may depend less on Valentine’s Day or emotional influences and more on the buyer’s cultural heritage.

Affluent Cultures Embrace the Color Red

To be more specific, affluent cultures may be the reason why certain pieces of contemporary art are selling high.

Countries all over the world embrace the color red. A number of these nations are located in Asia. In China, for instance, red is synonymous with luck and joy. In addition, on special occasions, Chinese nationals extend their cultural roots by offering a monetary gift known as a “red envelope.”

Considering the positive message red sends, it is understandable why red artwork may be appealing to people who live in China. In fact, Christie’s auction house reported that “…one in three of its customers were new in 2013, many of whom came from emerging markets such as China,” and “Sotheby’s estimates that China now accounts for $14 billion of the $58 billion global art market.” Sales reports go onto claim that there was a 36 percent increase of art sales in Asia and the Middle East. Another interesting fact shows the rate at which European’s purchase art dropped by 12 percent while the Americas, Hong Kong and Dubai all increased their fine art spending.

Nevertheless, China is viewed as playing a prominent role in the current health of the contemporary art market. An Associated Press article claims that China is “one reason the art market has rebounded from the global financial crisis of 2008.” People with new affluence in China are collecting contemporary artwork and may be encouraging art trends more than any color could alone.

While red has proven emotional draws and psychological intrigue, some wonder if growing affluence in China is the reason why red artwork is worth a fortune.

Read more Segmation blog posts about red artwork:

The Color Red and its Many Meanings

A Closer Look at the Color Red

Red and Green are an Unlikely Pair

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St. Valentine and the History of Romance

Valentine’s Day greetings come in many shapes and sizes. On February 14, people in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France and Australia can be found expressing their affection by sending cards, flowers, chocolates, and other special treats. These Valentine’s Day traditions are rarely disputed but the story of how the holiday came to be has many interpretations.

There is, however, one fact which all sources agree on: Valentine’s Day has evolved over the course of nearly 2000 years. Like many holidays, it was inspired by a noble man who was named saint by the Catholic Church. To understand the fullness of this holiday, get to know the person and traditions that are celebrated each year on February 14.

Saint Valentine

Before his sainthood, Valentine was a priest who protected young lovers’ right to marry in third century Rome. It is said that Emperor Claudias II banned marriage around this time because he believed that “single men made better soldiers than those with wives and children” (History.com). During this authoritarian ruling, Valentine defied the law and continued to marry couples in secret. He was later killed because of these actions.

Considered a martyr, the Catholic Church recognized Valentine as a saint and, in 5th century AD, Pope Gelasius declared February 14 as a holiday to celebrate him.

February 14

There is some debate about why February 14 was declared Valentine’s Day. One thought is that this date was an anniversary of St. Valentine’s execution by Claudias. It is also believed that Pope Gelasius wanted to implement a religious celebration that could negate a long held pagan festival called Lupercalia, which was held annually on February 15.

Adding Romance

The holiday hasn’t always been known as a romantic affair. According to public record, it took nearly 1000 years for the first Valentine’s Day card to be written. However, by the 18th century it was common place for people to exchange written notes and presents in the name of love. With the advent of the printing press, cards were created in mass quantities, which encouraged people to send “ready-made” cards.

Valentine’s Day has grown into a widely celebrated and beloved holiday in many countries, and knowing the history behind February 14 adds richness to the date.

Celebrate Valentine’s Day by partaking in something you enjoy and sharing it with others. Express your love through art by creating a beautiful picture. Not an artist? Become an artist in minutes by using Segmation, the only virtual paint by numbers game. Choose a pattern today: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=VAL.

Happy Valentine’s Day from Segmation.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Colorful Roses on Valentine’s Day Communicate Love

Be My Valentine

Roses May Smell the Same, but Colors Make a Difference

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Roses May Smell the Same, but Colors Make a Difference

In the year 1600, William Shakespeare wrote, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

These were the words of Juliet. She was justifying the feelings she had for Romeo while disagreeing with their feuding families. As she pealed back the thick layers of what kept them apart, she arrived at an honest analogy: a rose by any other name truly would smell as sweet.

Fast forward four centuries, and the rose is still at the center of conversation. Except, now, it has been discovered that, while all roses smell sweet, roses of different colors communicate different messages.

Recently, Reader’s Digest and proflowers.com got together to share the true meaning behind rose colors. They brought up five colors that may change your perception of roses. Or, at least the color you’ll buy your sweetheart, spouse, best friend, or sibling for Valentine’s Day.

Red

Red represents romance. More specifically, a red rose is known throughout the world as an expression of romantic love.

Yellow

Brighten up a friend’s day with a bouquet of yellow roses. People often think of sunshine when they see the color yellow. Just thinking about brightness can affect a person’s mood and bring joy to a dark moment.

Lavender

Do you believe in love at first sight? Lavender roses are great for young, flourishing relationships. The color is whimsical and has been known to represent royalty. Giving the gift of lavender roses can ensure the recipient feels respected and honored.

Pink

If red is the most popular color for a Valentine, pink is a close second. Rather than romance, however, pink portrays sweetness. According to the experts at proflowers.com, there are two variations of pink roses that have different meanings.

(1)    Dark pink roses are symbolic of gratitude and appreciation, and are a traditional way to say thanks.

(2)    Light pink roses are associated with gentleness and admiration, and can also be used as an expression of sympathy.

White

White roses are classic. In fact, they preceded the romanticism of red roses; at one time, these flowers represented true, romantic love.  Now, they find a place in weddings, as many brides include white roses in their bouquets.

William Shakespeare reminds us that a rose is a rose. But just because they share a sweet scent, doesn’t mean they are all the same. The color of a rose changes its meaning entirely and gives great variety to this beautiful flower.

Segmation has a variety of rose artwork available. The only digital paint by number software allows you to experience every color rose. Click here to pick out your first rose pattern: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=ROS.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

Sunflowers are Summer’s Glory

Amazing Wildflower

Poses of Roses

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Colorful Roses on Valentine’s Day Communicate Love

roses,day,valentine’s,love,romantic,red,color,communicate

The goal of most lovers on Valentine’s Day is to communicate love to their significant other. For these blessed people, Valentine’s Day is a much anticipated holiday that brings fulfillment and joy. Individuals in romantic relationships often seek to find the perfect Valentine’s Day gift for their loved one, and more often than not that gift ends up being a bouquet of roses. Depending upon their color, roses can communicate different types and intensities of love.

What color of roses communicates romantic love? Red, just as you probably guessed. Traditionally, red roses have symbolized passion, energy, and deep love. Red roses are best reserved for communicating intimate, romantic love. Given to someone you see in a platonic light, red roses could send a message you don’t intend, so be careful who you gift this type of flower to!

Whether or not you are in a romantic relationship, you may want to send roses to a dearly loved friend or family member on Valentine’s Day. No matter what you want to communicate, be it purity, friendship, admiration, etc., specific colors of roses can help you get your message across:

White — Love (especially of a spiritual nature), humility, reverence, and purity
Yellow — “Presents a ‘welcome back’ sentiment,” gladness, joy, and friendship
Pink — Innocence, affection, and understanding

For people who long to be in romantic relationships but simply haven’t found that special someone, Valentine’s Day can be an unhappy time. Everything these individuals see on February 14th reminds them that their desires are going unfulfilled. You can make Valentine’s Day special for these people by surprising them with roses. Since you want to avoid communicating a romantic message to such individuals, try sending them roses in the following colors:

Light pink — Gentility, grace, friendship, and admiration ROS021
Peach — Sincerity, sympathy, modesty, and gratitude
Dark pink — Appreciation, gratitude, thankfulness

It is the rare person who does not associate roses with Valentine’s Day, and for good reason: These classic flowers are excellent communicators of love in its various forms. We’re sure you have had your share of giving and receiving roses on Valentine’s Day. Leave a comment in the section below and share with Segmation what color of roses most delights you and makes you feel loved. Have a truly fulfilling Valentine’s Day!

Sources:

http://www.colorcombos.com/the-colors-of-valentines-day-article.html

Coming soon: There’s nothing that an art enthusiast loves more than to discover the works of an incredible artist. Read our upcoming post to learn about Gregg Visintainer, an artist worth getting to know.

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Communicate Love with Colorful Roses on Valentine’s Day

 roses,day,valentine’s,love,romantic,red,color,communicate

The goal of most lovers on Valentine’s Day is to communicate love to their significant other. For these blessed people, Valentine’s Day is a much anticipated holiday that brings fulfillment and joy. Individuals in romantic relationships often seek to find the perfect Valentine’s Day gift for their loved one, and more often than not that gift ends up being a bouquet of roses. Depending upon their color, roses can communicate different types and intensities of love.

What color of roses communicates romantic love? Red, just as you probably guessed. Traditionally, red roses have symbolized passion, energy, and deep love. Red roses are best reserved for communicating intimate, romantic love. Given to someone you see in a platonic light, red roses could send a message you don’t intend, so be careful who you gift this type of flower to!

Whether or not you are in a romantic relationship, you may want to send roses to a dearly loved friend or family member on Valentine’s Day. No matter what you want to communicate, be it purity, friendship, admiration, etc., specific colors of roses can help you get your message across:

White — Love (especially of a spiritual nature), humility, reverence, and purity
Pink — Innocence, affection, and understanding
Yellow — “Presents a ‘welcome back’ sentiment,” gladness, joy, and friendship

For people who long to be in romantic relationships but simply haven’t found that special someone, Valentine’s Day can be an unhappy time. Everything these individuals see on February 14th reminds them that their desires are going unfulfilled. You can make Valentine’s Day special for these people by surprising them with roses. Since you want to avoid communicating a romantic message to such individuals, try sending them roses in the following colors:

Light pink — Gentility, grace, friendship, and admiration roses,day,valentine’s,love,romantic,red,color,communicate
Dark pink — Appreciation, gratitude, thankfulness
Peach — Sincerity, sympathy, modesty, and gratitude

It is the rare person who does not associate roses with Valentine’s Day, and for good reason: These classic flowers are excellent communicators of love in its various forms. We’re sure you have had your share of giving and receiving roses on Valentine’s Day. Leave a comment in the section below and share with Segmation what color of roses most delights you and makes you feel loved. Have a truly fulfilling Valentine’s Day!
Sources:

http://www.colorcombos.com/the-colors-of-valentines-day-article.html

Coming soon: There’s nothing that an art enthusiast loves more than to discover the works of an incredible artist. Read our upcoming post to learn about Gregg Visintainer, an artist worth getting to know.

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Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC Be My Valentine (see more details here)

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Be My Valentine

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Segmation’s SegPlayPC Be My Valentine pattern collection is a fun, off-beat set of great colorful digital patterns. We know you’ll enjoy coloring these great patterns! What a great stress reliever as well.

Gorgeous art painting patterns to color and relax with. You don’t have to be a professional artist to enjoy this. Join the fun today! Segmation dot com

Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the world on February 14th. It’s a magical day where lovers express their love for one another in many traditional and untraditional ways. In today’s time, candy, chocolates, flowers, and heart filled cards are usually given as gifts in many cultures around the globe. Segmation’s SegPlay PC Valentine themed patterns includes many illustrated graphics of the holiday including roses, candy, cupids with arrows, dragons and puppies in love, and couples in love. Happy Valentine’s Day to all!

You can find a wide collection of Be my Valentine Scenes paint by number patterns and is available at the Segmation web site. These patterns may be viewed, painted, and printed using SegPlay™PC a fun, computerized paint-by-numbers program for Windows 7, 2000, XP, and Vista. Enjoy!

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