Category Archives: Space

Red and Green are an Unlikely Pair

Green vs. red - Auroral views are a study in contrastsEntering the holiday season, festive color combinations will soon be everywhere. Pine trees should be adorned with red ribbon and missile toe will layer green leaves upon berries. But in nature, the colors green and red are rarely seen together. This is not because of any earth-wide grudge that exists between the colored pair. The atmosphere seems to want it this way.

Solar Storms and Auroral Contrasts

Earlier this year, a solar storm hovered over the planet. People in regions far north of the equator were able to experience a magnificent sky, bold with color. Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, occur when a number of factors line up.

It is common to see auroras feature green waves breaking throughout the sky. This year, however, in New Zealand, one man photographed a red aurora.

Red is said to be a rare shade for aurora lights. Tony Phillips of SpaceWeather.com says, “Red auroras occur some 300 to 500 kilometers above Earth’s surface and are not yet fully understood.” There are some reasons why researchers believe the red aurora is so rare. Philips indicates is may be because, “…red lights may be linked to a large influx of electrons. When low-energy electrons recombine with oxygen ions in the upper atmosphere, red photons are emitted.”

Another reason why red auroras are rare is because it is hard to predict when this natural phenomenon will occur.

Minoru Yoneto photographed the red aurora in New Zealand on Oct. 2, 2013, but most of the time auroras reflect shades of green and sometimes purple.

Travel North to see Auroras

The solar storm that took place in early October could be seen from many parts of the world, including “as far south as Kansas, Ohio and Oklahoma.” Most of the time, seeing Northern Lights requires a person be situated in a northern climate.

An article by CNN states that, “The best chance to see the Northern Lights will be somewhere between 66 to 69 degrees north – a sliver of the world that includes northern Alaska and Canada and bits of Greenland, northern Scandinavia and northern Russia.”

Those who want to see green and red collide may have to travel even further north – this color combination is said to be most prevalent in the North Pole.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art and Atmosphere:

Light Creates Space, Color, and Perception

Extracting Art from Science

Plexiglass + Light = Awe Inspiring Art

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Color the Universe… Beige?

Color the Universe… BeigeSkies are blue. Clouds are white. The Universe is cosmic latte.

Nature’s color schemes are widely acknowledged and rather predictable. Now there is a color for the Universe as well.

To arrive at this color, astrologers considered the shades of light coming from over 200,000 galaxies. With further analysis, they concluded the Universe was beige. The anticlimactic result led to changing the official name to cosmic latte.

This means color has scientific value and advances human understanding of the universe at large. Now it is clear that color is more than earthly representation of nature, culture, and subjective emotions.

How then can humans determine something as magnificent as the Universe’s color? Might science be wrong? (After all, many of us are still recovering from the Pluto fiasco.)

Who Determines the Color of the Universe?

In 2002, scientists began debating the color of the universe. After leaving a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, D.C., astronomers from John Hopkins University worked hard to prescribe a color to the heavens.

At first, the John Hopkins team believed the Universe was turquoise. Once they corrected their formula, they discovered the universe was beige. This is somewhat of a letdown for people who prefer to live amongst galaxies shaded in vibrancy, not mediocrity.

How was this Color Determined?

Astronomers concluded that cosmic latte was the color of the Universe after light measurements were taken from more than 200,000 galaxies. These measurements were used to create a spectrum of the Universe. After the sum was calculated, the average optical wavelength of light was figured. In other words, calculating various starlights determined an average color.

What does Color Tell us About the Universe?

Stars are either blue or red, depending on the amount of heat they hold. Since the average color is beige, the universe currently has less blue stars than red. Different from earthly perception, however, these colors are not what they appear: blue indicates a star has a lot of energy and heat, while cooler stars are red.

According to a Daily Mail article, “[the Universe] colour has become much less blue over the past 10 billion years, indicating that redder stars are becoming more prevalent.”

Color may actually be an important factor in understanding the history of the Universe and how our galaxy is constantly changing.

If you could color the Universe, what color would you choose?

Cosmic latte is a creative title for beige. Other titles considered for the Universe color were “Skyvory” and “univeige.” What are your ideas for galaxy color names?

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art and Science:

Art and Science – A Genius Combination

Custom Art Made from Your DNA

Color Advances Science

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Turrell does it right with Light Creates Space, Color, Perception and Art

www.segmation.comThe unique art of James Turrell infuses space with light. The artist makes entire rooms, museums, and even craters his canvases by transforming large areas into viewing experiences that manipulate how observers perceive their environments when natural and artificial lights alternate.

Turrell has been experimenting with light since 1966. He seems to be fascinated by the way light impacts how an individual understands space, perception, and even color. In relation, the American artist says this about the miraculous correlation:

“We teach the color wheel, but we really should speak about the light frequencies of each eye, and then the context of vision in which they reach the eye, because that’s how we perceive.”

This post explores James Turrell’s approach to art by briefly exploring how light manipulates space, how light changes perception, and the necessary relationship between light and art. At the conclusion, there are resources to inspire further exploration into this intricate subject.

Light Manipulates Space

Most people understand that light affects the way we see color and perceive the world around us. But is it comprehensible that light can manipulate space regardless of physical material? Turrell sets out to prove that a limited and definite space can be created without manmade parameters, like those set up with wood beams, steel rods, or concrete. This is because light itself creates space. When light stops so does vision. And when vision stops, so do the confines of a space. Turrell calls this, “using the eyes to penetrate the space.”

Light Changes Perception

This offers a little help in grasping how the absence or presence of light changes our perception of space. To further explain, Turrell points up. He says this earthly phenomenon is best understood by looking up to the atmosphere we experience every day.

In the light of the sun, it is impossible to see stars. However, as the sun goes down, an individual’s penetration of vision goes out, and the stars become evident again. Stars, which are constant in placement, are only visible lights when our eyes are able to perceive them as such. This can only happen when sunlight is mostly absent from our view.

Light and Art: A Relationship

Artists have always looked at the world with curious fascination and longing to use light as a means of creating space. This is why, when artists began using lights, shading, and perspective within paintings, the world marveled at how lifelike the images became. The reality is, like Turrell, artist have always seen what does not exist because they have brilliance all their own.

James Turrell’s first exhibition in a New York museum,  Guggenheim , since 1980, opens June 21 through September 25, 2013. James Turrell is also in Los Angeles at the Los Angeles County Museum until April 6, 2014.

To read more about the effects of life on art, follow the works and study of James Turrell. Here are some helpful links to begin this exploration:

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

-The Importance of Color Vision and Art

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/paint-by-number-color-vision-effects-art-appreciation/

– Are Your Colors What They Seem to be?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/are-your-colors-what-they-seem-to-be/

– The Benefits of Making Art Outside

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-benefits-of-making-art-outside/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Light Creates Space, Color, and Perception

Light Creates Space, Color, and PerceptionThe unique art of James Turrell infuses space with light. The artist makes entire rooms, museums, and even craters his canvases by transforming large areas into viewing experiences that manipulate how observers perceive their environments when natural and artificial lights alternate.

Turrell has been experimenting with light since 1966. He seems to be fascinated by the way light impacts how an individual understands space, perception, and even color. In relation, the American artist says this about the miraculous correlation:

“We teach the color wheel, but we really should speak about the light frequencies of each eye, and then the context of vision in which they reach the eye, because that’s how we perceive.”

This post explores James Turrell’s approach to art by briefly exploring how light manipulates space, how light changes perception, and the necessary relationship between light and art. At the conclusion, there are resources to inspire further exploration into this intricate subject.

Light Manipulates Space

Most people understand that light affects the way we see color and perceive the world around us. But is it comprehensible that light can manipulate space regardless of physical material? Turrell sets out to prove that a limited and definite space can be created without manmade parameters, like those set up with wood beams, steel rods, or concrete. This is because light itself creates space. When light stops so does vision. And when vision stops, so do the confines of a space. Turrell calls this, “using the eyes to penetrate the space.”

Light Changes Perception

This offers a little help in grasping how the absence or presence of light changes our perception of space. To further explain, Turrell points up. He says this earthly phenomenon is best understood by looking up to the atmosphere we experience every day.

In the light of the sun, it is impossible to see stars. However, as the sun goes down, an individual’s penetration of vision goes out, and the stars become evident again. Stars, which are constant in placement, are only visible lights when our eyes are able to perceive them as such. This can only happen when sunlight is mostly absent from our view.

Light and Art: A Relationship

Artists have always looked at the world with curious fascination and longing to use light as a means of creating space. This is why, when artists began using lights, shading, and perspective within paintings, the world marveled at how lifelike the images became. The reality is, like Turrell, artist have always seen what does not exist because they have brilliance all their own.

To read more about the effects of life on art, follow the works and study of James Turrell. Here are some helpful links to begin this exploration:

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

-The Importance of Color Vision and Art

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/paint-by-number-color-vision-effects-art-appreciation/

– Are Your Colors What They Seem to be?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/are-your-colors-what-they-seem-to-be/

– The Benefits of Making Art Outside

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-benefits-of-making-art-outside/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com