Category Archives: school

What do School Colors and Mascots Represent?

What do School Colors and Mascots RepresentPeople take a lot of pride in their schools. At every age, school colors and mascots unify centers of education. Most schools chose a combination of colors to represent the student body; this offers clear distinction from cross town rivals. To set themselves apart, schools get creative with who or what will represent them.

Student bodies are often the ones to come up with mascot characters. These representatives are picked with thoughtfulness, creativity, and some zany ideas. To exemplify this point, which will be expounded on later, envision a banana slug, an artichoke, and a holiday tree.

But how do these masterminds come up with the latest designs?  What makes a mascot significant?

Mascots embody characteristics and values of the entire school. They make a point and hold true to the cultural and historical significance of the education center. And it doesn’t hurt that mascots are entertaining too.

Mascots Make a Point

The spirit of a student body is electrifying. Mascots draw on this energy by representing collective beliefs. Two schools exemplify this:

  • UC Santa Cruz students were deliberate in their decisions to choose a banana slug for a mascot. They believe sports should be available to everyone, which is why one of the lowliest creatures represents them; Sammy the Banana Slug gets to be part of the fun too.
  • Scottsdale Community College has a fighting artichoke named Artie cheering them on. Sick of the amount of money sports takes from school budgets, students picked something that would represent their disinterest.

In both examples, students used art in the form of a school mascot to make their views evident.

Mascots Honor Cultural and Historic significance

Mascots stand – and often dance – for school ideals. Education institutions are foundational to communities. The citizens in surrounding areas often look to schools to honor the heritage of the town or city. This is why mascots often rally students together and stand as an expression of goodwill. They are a means to making students feel as though they belong to something bigger. Within the community, schools are a driving force in maintaining pride of involves everyone’s efforts.

Examples of mascots that represent community values include the University of Texas Longhorns, The University of Colorado Buffaloes, and more.

Years out of school, people rarely remember what final scores were for homecoming football games. But they always remember their school colors and mascots. Beyond this, people are drawn to these images for the rests of their lives. The entertainment it provides is great but the memories are far more than that: schools have characteristics that shape the identities of students and communities.

Image made available by KKfromBB on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Education:

How to Encourage Creativity in Children

Inspiring Digital Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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What does a Good Art Teacher Look Like?

What does a Good Art Teacher Look LikeSome people are gifted with artistic abilities. Others develop them in time. Most diligent students can become creative artists with the help of good art teachers.

Excellent art teachers are memorable additions to the education process. In many cases, art teachers play monumental roles in the lives of students. Therefore, the question stands: What makes a good art teacher? Listed below are three character traits of a good art teacher.

Passion

Passion is contagious. An art teacher fills the classroom with enthusiasm when he or she enjoys work, continues developing art skills, and encourages students. One of the most effective ways to do this involves creating visual aids. Students need these examples and enjoy seeing a teacher display his or her abilities.

Perspective

When art teachers educate students about perspective, it usually involves discussing a work of art from the artist’s point of view. Another definition of perspective ought to be considered though. When reviewing art work, a good teacher keeps an open mind and invites the student to explain his or her masterpiece. This enables students to express themselves and develop creativity.

One of the biggest mistakes an art teacher can make is failing to consider personal perspective in light of how the project is graded. There is always a story behind an art project and many times it is not what others expect.

Balance

As mentioned above, art teachers need to be passionate, fun-loving, and value the efforts of their students. All the while, they must remember the title of teacher; this role requires a person to instruct the classroom and challenge students, even if it means being “tough” at times. These traits are essential to ensuring students better themselves in areas of creativity and art. Great art teachers know how to be fun and constructive all at once.

When describing a good art teacher, many statements come to mind. One being, teachers are “not born but made”. Over time, these individuals become skilled in the art of teaching. Which seems entirely appropriate for a good art teacher.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Projects:

Bauhaus Art School

Why Are School Buses Yellow?

Google Art Project Makes Art More Accessible

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Creative Connections Strengthen Schools

ImageThere is no secret about it: art makes for an exciting learning environment. Art projects are the first introduction to education for young children. Now, with advancements in art education and the creativity of culture, schools are finding additional benefits to these activities. Art serves as a connector that unifies students and strengthens schools.

Even though art programs have been cut in recent years, teachers and administrators are using classrooms as catalysts for creativity. One example of this is how teachers use hands-on projects to promote learning traditional subject matters. In addition, entire schools are coming together to celebrate the artwork of these non-traditional settings.

As a result, art is becoming the ultimate educator. Even without art classes and proper funding, faculties are using creativity to excite students and promote learning.

Teachers Take Charge of Creativity in the Classroom

More than ever, teachers are picking up the slack for consequences of limited funding. Many educators can be found encouraging students to showcase creativity in the classroom. Using art to inform students about other subject areas is proving to be effective and productive. In the end, students learn in memorable ways and create something they are proud to show off. They are expressing their education, making classroom walls the new chalkboards.

Schools Connect Students in Creative Ways

Administrators are encouraging teachers to make art a part of learning. They are celebrating this by coming up with creative ways to showcase art in every classroom. Some are using murals to display art from all students. This encourages community involvement; different age groups learn to appreciate the artwork of other students, both younger and older. More so, collecting all artwork allows students and teachers to feel invested in schoolwide projects. Likewise, it provides a great backdrop for the learning environment.

Art is a powerful tool for education. It can enhance the atmosphere of learning in any school. When teachers and administrators partner together, they can overcome obstacles of inadequate funding that impacts art education. This unifies a school and inspires student communities.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Education:

How to Encourage Creativity in Children

Inspiring Digital Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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Back to School Art Projects

Back to School Art ProjectsSummer holiday is over. September is the month when children return to school. Young students in their elementary years may experience mixed emotions about early mornings and homework. Starting up such a routine is less than thrilling but back to school art projects can make returning to the classroom exciting.

Listed below are art projects that are creative, fun, and great conversations starters. Since getting back to school is all about starting fresh and making new friends, these functional art pieces are sure to kick off the school year on the right foot.

Pencil Toppers

Make plain, old yellow pencils fun. A number of household items can be used to top a pencil. (Walnuts are an example listed here: http://www.redtedart.com/2012/08/13/back-to-school-crafts-ideas/.) This is a great back to school art project for young kids. And, it makes a student’s school supplies one-of-a-kind.

Notebook Designs

Many schools require students cover their books. Change it up this year by covering a textbook with something extraordinary – like denim. Also, make ordinary notebooks more exciting with stickers and original designs.

Backpacks

Adding patches and pins to a backpack can give it a new look. For young students, a themed backpack may boost confidence and increase excitement about going back to school.

Organizing the Homework Area

Schoolwork starts in the classroom and continues at home. Setting up a creative homework area is a fun and beneficial activity. These resources have a few fun ways for kids to set up their own homework stations: http://spoonful.com/back-to-school/back-to-school-crafts. Maintaining this space within a home can be a great way to stay organized and make schoolwork enjoyable.

Back to school is anything but boring. Make sure kids get excited — and stay excited — by adding creative activities. These back to school art projects may begin at home but they are taken into the classroom. A student can show off his or her creative talents and stand out this year.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Projects:

Candy Art: We Don’t all Have to be Artists to Create Art!

The Meaning of Thanksgiving and Thanksgiving Art

Ideas for Creating Halloween Art

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How did the yellow school bus come about anyways?

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Love it or hate it, yellow is here to stay. The color wheel’s brightest shade can be seen on the road every day. But neither cars nor trucks have the unique yellow paint jobs that belong to school buses. How did the yellow school bus come about anyways? And why are school buses still being painted this shade?

History of the Yellow School Bus

Knowing the colorful history of yellow school buses sheds light on this timeless tradition. The lineage of the school bus dates back to the 1930s when a man by the name of Frank Cyr conducted an in depth study of student transportation vehicles throughout the United States.

At the beginning of his research, Cyr, a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University, was observing school buses that cost (on average) $2,000. Quickly he found out that these vehicles had little in common. Various manufacturers, schools, and districts used different buses.

This inspired him to call a conference of educators in spring 1939. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss a standard protocol for school buses. The end result was a 42 page manual that discussed the ins and outs of the school bus. In this manual, the color was declared: national school bus chrome.

National School Bus Yellow

In 2010, the questionable use of “chrome” was exchanged for “yellow”. Still, the color seen on school buses today was the color decided at the conference over seven decades ago. The precise shade of yellow was taken so seriously, that a committee was appointed just to decided which one of 50 shades of yellow would appear on the school bus.

Why has the Color not Changed?

Once national school bus yellow was decided, it became a nationwide mandate. One of the original reasons for the broad directive was because school bus manufacturers “had to have different booths to spray-paint them.” More so, the color became a universal symbol of student transportation.

In fact, most Americans have been raised in environments where yellow school buses shuttle children to and from school. It is hard to imagine life without them.

Source:
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/why-are-school-buses-yellow-a-teachers-college-professor-said-so/

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