Category Archives: Puzzle

Putting Together an Artist’s Packet

If your dream is to show your artwork in a gallery, one of the most common ways to get your foot in the door is to “wow” them with your artist’s packet.

What is an artist’s packet?

An artist’s packet is the first thing that most galleries will see when you approach them with your work. Most gallery owners are far too busy to let artists drop by and show off their portfolios, so instead they require hopeful artists to send an informative artist’s packet through the mail. This allows them the chance to look through your artwork and relevant information at their own pace.

Before you mail off your artist packet to every gallery in your city, first you should conduct due diligence by either researching the art galleries in person or online. Look at the type of art they show; would your work fit in with the styles and subjects they show? If so, call the gallery or check their website to see if they accept submissions. If they do, you’re good to go.

An artist’s packet is basically your way of “introducing” yourself to a gallery owner and/or curator. Be sure to include:

  • Reproductions of your art – In the old days, it was the norm for artists to send slides to galleries. These days, while some galleries may still prefer slides, many galleries now prefer CDs or inexpensive, but true-to-life, print-outs. You can call the gallery or check their website to see which format they prefer. In any case, make sure you take high-quality scans or photographs of your artwork so that the gallery owner can get a strong feel for what your work looks like.
  • CV or resume – Your CV or resume really shows the what, where, and when of your art career thus far. You should include things like: education, previous exhibitions (such as gallery or museum showings, art festivals, etc), previous and current gallery affiliations, major commissions, works sold or notable private collections, awards and grants, magazine and newspaper mentions, interviews and reviews, workshops you’ve led, artist-in-residence programs you have participated in, and any other art-related accomplishments.
  • Press Clippings – If your work has been reviewed by the press, include photocopies of those reviews.
  • Artist Statement – The artist statement explains the “why” and “how” of your work. It should answer questions like: What are you trying to express? What does the viewer need to know when he/she looks at your work, in order to understand it correctly? The artist statement should never be more than 1 page in length. Remember that gallery owners are busy people – they wouldn’t have time to read more than a page!
  • Bio – Your bio should also not be more than 1 page in length; usually a paragraph will suffice. Your bio will be more casual than the artist statement, letting the gallery owner know who you are and what makes you unique.
  • Business card – A business card shows that you are professional, so be sure to include a high-quality business card in your packet.
  • A letter of introduction – When you put your artist packet together, put the letter of introduction on top of everything else. Address the letter to the gallery owner by name. (If you don’t know the person’s name, call to find out.) Explain to him or her how you first heard of their gallery and tell them why you feel your art would be a good fit. Again, keep your letter of introduction short and sweet – it should fit easily on 1 page.
  • SASE – If you want your materials returned, include a self-addressed stamped envelope.

After you send off your artist packet, you can relax and paint! It is polite to give them a follow-up call a week later to make sure they received the packet, but try not to be pushy. Gallery owners are busy people and they will review your work in their own time.

Good luck!
Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

United States President Caricature Art by www.segmation.com!

United States President Caricature by Segmation

United States President Caricature by Segmation

United States President Caricature Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC by Segmation (see more details here)

Here’s a fun and easy set of United States President Caricature patterns (thanks to our friends at Graphics Factory for providing this content) The set includes 17 nicely done portraits of the more familiar presidents including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush.

When these patterns are completely colored, the resulting image has a very strong resemblance to the original artwork. These vibrant and colorful pieces of art are truly engaging and exciting for you to paint, and especially a joy to look at when completed.

With over 2800 available patterns from an ever growing collection of artistic themes, SegPlay® PC will provide you with hours upon hours of painting fun and entertainment. SegPlay® PC Splash Screen With SegPlay® PC as an Art Appreciation teaching tool, students can memorize famous works of art, color by color. Children can truly touch images related to a wide assortment of subjects. As a parent or educator, the learning possibilities stretch as far as your image-ination!

SegPlay® PC is in the computer software category known as “casual gaming”. While it provides a pleasurable and creative escape from mundane computer activities, the program is simple to use and new players can begin the painting function immediately, with just a few, intuitive tools. However, the program also offers rich features with challenging and engaging options, so it expands with each user, whether they seek an education in art appreciation or just want to enjoy a creative gaming challenge.

With a dynamic and clear user interface and fun sound effects, the program’s gaming features compliment the artistic benefits and engage users at all levels. For a gaming challenge, users can race against a timer to complete patterns in a given timeframe at levels from Easy to Experienced and Expert. Users can also employ speed-painting tools, monitor the mistake counter, and track the number of remaining pieces and colors to increase the program’s challenging and addictive potential.

United States President Caricature

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with United States President Caricature from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

Be my Valentine by www.segmation.com

SegPlayPC_VALBanner.jpg

You’ll find in our SegPlayPC Be My Valentine pattern collection. This is a fun, off-beat set of great colorful digital patterns. We know you’ll enjoy coloring these great patterns! What a great stress reliever as well.

Gorgeous art painting patterns to color and relax with. You don’t have to be a professional artist to enjoy this. Join the fun today! Segmation.com

Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the world on February 14th. It’s a magical day where lovers express their love for one another in many traditional and untraditional ways. In today’s time, candy, chocolates, flowers, and heart filled cards are usually given as gifts in many cultures around the globe. Our set of Valentine themed patterns includes many illustrated graphics of the holiday including roses, candy, cupids with arrows, dragons and puppies in love, and couples in love. Happy Valentine’s Day to all!
This set contains 24 paintable patterns.

You can find a wide collection of Be my Valentine Scenes paint by number patterns and is available at the Segmation web site. These patterns may be viewed, painted, and printed using SegPlay™PC a fun, computerized paint-by-numbers program for Windows 7, 2000, XP, and Vista. Enjoy!

SegPlayPC_VALthumbstrip.jpg

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

Leonardo da Vinci – The Renaissance Man www.segmation.com

SegPlayPC_LEOBanner.jpg

You’ll find in our SegPlayPC Leonardo da Vinci pattern collection. This is a fun, off-beat set of great colorful digital patterns. We know you’ll enjoy coloring these great patterns! What a great stress reliever as well.

Gorgeous art painting patterns to color and relax with. You don’t have to be a professional artist to enjoy this. Join the fun today! Segmation.com

Leonardo da Vinci was an amazingly talented and well rounded individual who lived in Italy during the Renaissance period (1500-1600). His talents included architecture, engineering, mathematics, music, and of course painting. Considered one of the greatest painters of all time, we are excited to bring many of his famous works into the creative world of SegPlayPC (No doubt Leonardo himself would have enjoyed this form of painting!). This collection contains all of his well known images including the Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, Bacchus, The Baptism of Christ, Madonna Litta, Annunciation, and many many more.

You can find a wide collection of Leonardo da Vinci Scenes paint by number patterns and is available at the Segmation web site. These patterns may be viewed, painted, and printed using SegPlay™PC a fun, computerized paint-by-numbers program for Windows 7, 2000, XP, and Vista. Enjoy!

SegPlayPC_LEOthumbstrip.jpg

Leonardo and Picasso: Artists of Their Times www.segmation.com

Leonardo da Vinci and Pablo Picasso are two of the most famous painters in history (if not the most famous); one a Renaissance genius renowned for his skillful realism, the other a modern legend and co-founder of Cubism.

Did you know that even though Leonardo’s Mona Lisa is the most famous painting in the world, he only produced less than 30 paintings in total? Even then, many of them were left unfinished. Picasso, on the other hand, created nearly 2000 paintings – plus sculptures, drawings, ceramics, and hand-pulled prints that combine to over 50,000 works of art! (To be fair though, Leonardo also left behind a substantial number of drawings, sketches, and pages full of notes.)

One reason for this vast difference in the number of paintings produced is that both artists were products of the times in which they lived. When Leonardo was alive, artists didn’t have the luxury of creating art for art’s sake. Instead they were commissioned by the church, guilds and wealthy patrons to create paintings and sculptures that were expected to depict certain themes. For this reason, Leonardo needed to find work where he could. During times of war, he had to work as a military architect and engineer, designing methods of defense. Making art took a backseat to the work necessary for survival.

By the time Picasso was born 362 years after Leonardo’s death, the world was a different place. Artists had more freedom than ever to paint what they wanted. Self-expression in art was more widely accepted and expected. Instead of being commission-based, most artwork was sold in galleries to private collectors, as money flowed more abundantly through society than it did during the Renaissance. By the 20th century, successful artists such as Picasso were able to sustain themselves from the sale of their artworks alone, and did not need to seek alternate forms of employment to make ends meet.

These factors may contribute to the reason why Picasso created so many more artworks than Leonardo, even though Leonardo is the creator of the most famous painting in the world. Who knows what more Leonardo could have accomplished if he’d been alive in modern times?

Segmation

Segmation Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC by Segmation (see more details here)

ChromaBlend Art Game by www.segmation.com!

ChromaBlend by Segmation

ChromaBlend by Segmation

ChromaBlend Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC by Segmation (see more details here)

Longtime Segmation SegPlay™ contributor, Susan Richardson, has created an exciting set of multi-colored images for us to use with SegPlayPC™ These chromatic patterns are a joy to look at and utilize a vivid color palette. Have some psychedelic fun with the ChromaBlend collection! Cascade, Confusion, Eyes in the Round, Expand, Fractured Rainbow, It’s Raining, Neon Impression, Organza II , Marbled, Orange, Purple, Pink and Blue, Rainbow II, Stirring of the Water, Spring Through My Window, Square Circle I, Surreal Dream, The Blues, 3D IV and Wave collections are included.
This set contains 20 paintable patterns.
ChromaBlend

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with ChromaBlend from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

The Lingo of Color www.segmation.com

[picapp align=”center” wrap=”false” link=”term=paint&iid=310124″ src=”http://view.picapp.com/pictures.photo/image/310124/paintbrush-water-amongst/paintbrush-water-amongst.jpg?size=500&imageId=310124″ width=”380″ height=”254″ /]

It is said that the human eye can discern between 1 million and 7 million colors. Do you think you could name them all?

Most people can easily identify the 3 primary colors (red, yellow, blue), and the three secondary colors (orange, green and purple), plus white and black. It’s their many mixtures, variants, tints and shades that cause a stumbling block when it comes to identifying colors.

Because of their familiarity with pigments, artists have a slew of color names at their disposal when it comes to naming colors. (For instance, “I painted a Cerulean sky over an Ultramarine ocean, tinged with hints of Light Hansa.”) These terms may leave non-artists scratching their heads. Where do these color names originate?

As we discussed in a previous article, some artist pigments are named for the material that they are made from (cobalt blue, made from cobalt), or the place where they the pigments first came from (burnt sienna, from Sienna, Italy). Other colors are named for the person who first discovered the pigment that could be used to create the color (fuchsia, named for the German scientist Leonard Fuchs).

The complexity of color is difficult to pin down with the limitations of language – especially when one person claims to see lavender while another argues that the color is actually lilac. Aside from the necessity of naming pigments and hues for color-matching purposes, perhaps many color names are best left to the imagination, where poetic expressiveness can assign the most appropriate color name for that particular purpose and moment.

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

FREE SegPlay® Art Painting Evaluation for 10 days, Enjoy us, so easy, fun and what a brain teaser with no mess!

Wacky and Wonderful Art Cars www.segmation.com

A dinosaur on wheels… a Cadillac covered in Legos… a tie-dyed school bus… if you see all of these rolling towards you, it doesn’t mean you’re stuck in a surrealistic dream – it probably means you’re watching an Art Car Parade!

An art car is a vehicle that has been transformed through the magic of paint or found objects, and a healthy dose of creativity, into a mobile objet d’art.  First originating during the hippie movement of the 60s, the art car phenomenon is still alive and well today.  Annual Art Car Parades take place in cities such as Houston, Minneapolis and San Francisco, and also feature prominently in festivals such as Burning Man.  Houston’s annual Art Car Parade draws nearly a quarter of a million attendees, testimony to the popularity of these wacky and wonderful automobiles.

“Mutant vehicles” are the more radically-transformed cousins of art cars (as shown above).  Mutant vehicles refer to cars that barely resemble our common conception of what a car should look like, because they have been transformed into whimsical mobile creations, like giant red wagons, hot dogs, monsters and even cathedrals.

Artist and non-artists alike have taken to decorating their cars.  Those who don’t consider themselves “traditional” artists embellish their cars by covering them entirely with bumper stickers, pennies, Astroturf, Legos, and Barbie Dolls.  Fine artists can show off their painting skills by creating detailed and elaborate murals on their cars, usually using enamel or airbrush.

For artists, an art car is an excellent way to show off your art because it becomes a mobile gallery, turning heads on the highway and in parking lots.  If you have an art car or decide to transform your car into one, make the most out of the free publicity by adding a bumper sticker with your website address, or by painting your name and website URL somewhere prominent.

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

FREE SegPlay® Art Painting Evaluation for 10 days, Enjoy us, so easy, fun and what a brain teaser with no mess!

Paul Cezanne Post-Impressionist Colorful Historical Art by www.segmation.com!

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC by Segmation (see more details here)

Segmation is a well organized collection of art patterns that brings to life the most recognized works of Paul Cézanne, a French post-impressionist painter. You’ll find landscapes, portraits, and still life’s of which Cézanne shows a mastery of design and an influence towards cubism. Twenty of his most famous works are included from his dark period (1861-1870), Impressionist period (1870-1878), Mature Period (1878-1890), and Final Period (1890-1905).
This set contains 20 paintable patterns.
Paul Cezanne

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Paul Cezanne from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

The Many Different Hues of Blue

www.segmation.com – the Art of Pieceful Imaging

If you want to paint a seascape with soaring blue skies and rippling blue water, you might go to the art supply store and stand in awe at the sheer range of blues available with different shades, tints, and variations in hue. For instance, a major paint manufacturer offers at least 15 different types of blue, from Cerulean Blue on the lighter end of the spectrum to Indigo Blue on the darker end.

The more you work with your paints, the more you’ll intuitively recognize which tube of blue to choose when you need to paint blue eyes, a bluebird or a deep blue sea. Although the distinct characteristics of each blue might be familiar to you, do you know where the name for each particular color comes from?

As we discussed in a previous article on the origins of color names for artist pigments, many paint colors derive their names from what they are made of: for instance, Phthalo Blue is named for the synthetic pigment Phthalocyanine, and Cobalt Blue is named for the lustrous metal cobalt, etc.

Let’s explore where some of these other blues get their color names:

  • Anthraquinone Blue – “Anthraquinone” is an organic compound that forms the basis for many dyes.
  • Cerulean Blue – “Cerulean” has its roots in the Latin word caelum which means heaven or sky.
  • Indigo – “Indigo” is named for the Indigofera genus, many plants of which are used as a dye.
  • Navy blue – The color “Navy blue” is named for the dark blue uniforms worn by officers in the British Royal Navy and was first used as a color name in 1840.
  • Primary Cyan – “Cyan” comes from the Greek word kýanos, which means dark blue substance.
  • Ultramarine blue – “Ultramarine” derives from the Latin word ultramarines which means beyond the sea.

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

FREE SegPlay® Art Painting Evaluation for 10 days, Enjoy us, so easy, fun and what a brain teaser with no mess!