Category Archives: hues

The Evolution of Crayola Crayon Colors

1c The Evolution of Crayola Crayon ColorsIf you explore colors at Crayola.com you are greeted by a display of pixilated colors, but the varying shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple only tell half the story. Today, there are over 120 Crayola crayon colors. This is a far cry from the eight colors Binney & Smith first presented in 1903.

Many of us agree that color seems to be one of life’s constants. Crayola might agree, arguing that their colorful crayons don’t change; they multiply.

In fact, after evaluating the evolution of Crayola colors between 1903 and 2010, it appears that Crayola crayon colors grow 2.56 percent each year. According to artist/scientist Stephen Von Worley’s blog, datapointed.net, this means Crayola crayon colors double every 28 years. Therefore, 120 colors today may mean 330 shades in 2050. To this, Worley says, “…Crayola’s gonna need a bigger box…”

This may bring up the question, might we discover more colors?

It may be possible to answer this question by tracing the Crayola crayon collection back to its roots. The original eight colors were known as hues. Hues are pure colors. If white is added to hues, a new family of color is born. These colors are known as tints. When gray is added to hues, the newly produced colors are known as tones. Adding black to hues creates shades. In calculating the amount of colors that derive from hues, tints, tones and shades we have 32 colors, which is only half of Crayola’s “Big Box.”

1a The Evolution of Crayola Crayon ColorsLooking at the chart posted on datapointed.net, Crayola Color Chart, 1903-2010, it is evident that Crayola colors go far beyond mixing white, gray, and black with pure colors. Crayola mixes colors with colors to create crayons like “Lavender Lollipop Violet,” “Mountain Meadow,” and “Red Orange.” They even have two shades titled, “Blue Green” and “Green Blue.” Ironically enough, these are two completely different crayons.

However, Crayola also discontinues crayon colors. Some of the recent retirees include, “magic mint” and “orange red.”

In recent years, Crayola has led the innovation of colors with collections like “Multicultural,” which includes skin tone shades that match many ethnicities. They also boast metallic, gel, and glitter collections.

Crayola is known to think outside the box when it comes to research and development. Therefore, it is hard to say they’ve found every color under the sun. This company is in the color creation business. We might have to wait until 2050 to see just how many more colors they create.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art

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Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades – What’s the Difference?

Who Creates Color TrendsLet’s face the facts: we can easily take color for granted. Even when we are enjoying the brilliant hues of nature and the masterful shades in paintings, it is hard to be fully aware of the colorful intricacies we are taking in.

Case in point: do you know the difference between hues, tints, tones and shades?

To some, it comes as a shock to learn that these colorful qualities make up multiple tiers of the color wheel.

Basic and Intricate Elements of the Color Wheel

At first glance, the color wheel is a tool that guides us in using primary, secondary and complementary colors. But it also does much more than this. It describes analogous colors (any three colors that sit side by side), split complementary colors (which considers the two colors adjacent to a complimentary hue), and tetradic colors (a group of four colors, made up of two complimentary colors).

Beyond defining aesthetic color combinations, the color wheel also offers a good starting point from which tints, tones and shades can be properly identified.

The color wheel at its most basic form is made up of 12 hues. Hues are pure colors. When white is added to hues, they lighten and become known as tints. When gray is added to hues, they dim and become known as tones. When black is added to hues, they darken and become shades.

This excellent image, compliments of lifehacker.com, shows the many levels of the color wheel:

Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good

Using Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades

Different tiers of the color wheel come in handy when decorating, designing graphics, deciding on outfits or preparing works of art. For instance, matching a hue with its complementary shade can make for a dynamic combination. Sometimes, people find hues to be strong and bold. They may prefer light, more whimsical tints or are drawn to the calmer depths of shades.

More so, it can be nice to use one hue and its tints, shades and tones. This creates a monotone chromatic color scheme. In the same vein, a monotone achromatic color scheme uses all variations of neutral colors and can be brought to life with a brilliant hue.

Did you know the color wheel was so intricate? To learn more about the differences between hues, tints, tones and shades, as well as learn how to pick the best looking combinations for your wardrobe, home décors and art projects, check out this blog post: http://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-color-theory-to-know-what-looks-goo-1608972072.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel, but the most important thing to know is it won’t steer you wrong.

Read more Segmation blog posts about color theory:

Basic Color Theory – Color Matters

Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

How Well Do You Know The Color Wheel?

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Do Men and Women See Colors Differently?

Do Men and Women See Colors Differently

Have you ever wondered if men and women have visual differences? After all, we don’t always see eye to eye.

Now you can put curiosity to rest; one study shows people of opposing genders disagree on hues. This means men and women experience different color perspectives.

Nevertheless, with new information comes new questions like, why? What causes this inconsistency?

How do Men and Women See Colors Differently?

Men and women rarely see the same color hues. It is common for males to require a longer wavelength than females in order to experience similar shades of certain colors.

Warmer colors have longer wavelengths than cooler colors. This means that reds and oranges are likely to appear bolder and stronger to men. Women, on the other hand, tend to see vibrant green hues with clarity and precision.

Males are also known to be better at identifying colorful detail from a distance, while women excel at this when colors are closer. In general, men are more sensitive to colors too. Yet, women have the ability to easily differentiate between slight changes in color.

What Causes Visual Differences in Men and Women?

Realizing men and women have different visual perspectives is interesting, but learning why opposite genders experience colors in unique ways is enlightening. To uncover this mystery, it is necessary to consult evolutionary theories. Let’s return to a time when men and women were known as “hunters and gathers.”

In addition to identifying details from a distance, males have keen senses for detecting fast moving objects and flashing lights. Ultimately, requiring longer wavelengths that exist in warmer colors also increases man’s attention to “fine detail and rapidly moving stimuli.” All the while, females excel at distinguishing colors close at hand. This implies men are naturally good at hunting, and women are purposed for gathering objects like nuts and berries.

Do Men and Women See Colors Differently 1This research does not prove that one gender sees color better than the other. Rather, men and women have different visual strengths that were, at one time, used in tandem to provide sustenance for themselves and their communities.

Citing a number of tests and color experiments, this study reveals how men and women see the world in unique ways.

Explore more about this subject, and keep the information in mind next time you’re decorating.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Color Perspectives:

Light Creates Space, Color, Perception and Art

Perspectives on Color

Color Can Help You Understand Personality Types

Image made available by charles van L. on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

Image made available by Beshef on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

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