Category Archives: History of Color

What Is True About The Color Blue?

Blue is a color of speculation; the color means different things to different people. For instance, some find the hue mellowing while others find it encourages strength. Today we dress boys in blue, but until the 1900s it was known as a girl’s color. More so, the amount of blue shades can seem overwhelming. From sky blue to navy and even electric, each blue shade can be interpreted in a unique way.

Diving into the history behind the color blue shines light on its checkered past, but it doesn’t necessarily explain why we feel blue or are drawn to blue humor. Nevertheless, knowing the history of blue can help us understand how this color influences the world we live in today.

Biblical Blue

In biblical times the color blue was seen as holy. The Old Testament notes how the High Priest wore a blue robe and the Ark of the Covenant was covered with a blue cloth. Similarly, in the book of Numbers, God instructs Moses to tell the Israelites to “…make tassels on the corners of your garments, with a blue cord on each tassel. You will have these tassels to look at and so you will remember all the commands of the Lord, that you may obey them…” (Numbers 15:40 NIV). More so, recall early paintings of the Virgin Mary. She was often portrayed wearing celestial blue.

Blue Laws

However, by the early years of Colonial America blue had taken on a different meaning. In short, blue meant bad. At this time, there was something called, “Blue Laws.” According to First Amendment professor David Hudson, these laws were put in place to “…encourage people to go to church, and to prohibit people from engaging in secular activities.” A shining example of a Blue Law is the prohibition of alcohol sales on Sundays.

Blue Humor

Today, many of us fear the pink slip, but years ago comedians feared the blue envelope. In the early 1900s, traveling comedy groups were handed blue envelopes before they entered new venues. The envelopes contained notes on what material ought to be cut from the show so no local audience members would be offended.

What Do You Think About The Color Blue?

Believe it or not, the rich history behind the color blue continues. Have you ever wondered why people sing the blues? And do you know what a “blue devil” is? The NPR article, “Sacred, Sad And Salacious: With Many Meanings, What Is True Blue?“ continues to unravel the history behind blue. But this story cannot end until we know what the color blue means to you.

Do you have a strong connection to the color blue? If so, what shade speaks to you? And how do you use this color to brighten up your world? Share with us by leaving a comment in the “Leave a Reply” section below.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Blue is for Boys, Pink is for Girls

Blue Trees in Seattle

Fun Facts About Familiar Colors

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Why Is Your Favorite Color Your Favorite Color?

Psychology of Color - Segmation Digital Art GameYou probably have a favorite color, but chances are you rarely stop to think about why you are drawn to this particular hue.

For years, psychologists have been claiming that people are drawn to choice shades for particular reasons. This means that, whether you know it or not, there is good reason why your favorite color is your favorite color.

What is Your Favorite Color?

It is likely that your preference stems from personal tastes and the culture that surrounds you. After all, we develop color affinities at young ages. For instance, to make conversation with a child, it is common to ask, “What is your favorite color?” Therefore, it makes sense to think that these hues have an influence on our personalities as we age too. According to some psychologists and color experts, our favorite colors reflect parts of our personalities, but how?

One artist who correlates colors with personality traits is Oliver Munday. His color maps recently made their way into a highly anticipated book on color, ROY G. BIV: An Exceedingly Surprising Book About Color (Bloomsbury 2013).

Color Maps of Your Favorite Colors

The color maps explore long held truths about colors as well as historical events and phenomenon related to specific colors. Like, did you know the yellow pencil can be traced back to Ch’ing dynasty in China? At the time, yellow was the “exclusive imperial color for the country” (Huffingtonpost.com).

Take a look at Munday’s color map of black. “Miserable Ecstasy” and “The Vast and The Minute” it says in bold. Nobody needs to ask why these sayings are associated with the shade because they make perfect sense. As the color map enfolds them into historical events and phenomenon, like “The curious science of ink” and “Glossy vs. matte blacks,” readers begin to learn facts about their favorite color and become enlightened as to why they prefer certain shades.

Emotional Connections to Color

To some, it is fascinating to learn that the reason our favorite colors are our favorite colors are rooted in history. However, most of us understand that there are emotional reasons why we connect with certain shades. Empower-Yourself-With-Color-Psychology.com lays out what your favorite color says about you on an emotional level. Click on the link to find out what your favorite hue reveals.

If you’ve never stopped to think about why your favorite color is your favorite color, take time to explore this thought today. Use the resources and links provided in this post to identify the historical significance and emotional ties you have to your choice hue.

We live in a colorful world. Learning about your favorite color may enlighten you.

Read more Segmation blog posts about color psychology:

The Psychology of Color

Colors Change What is Beautiful

Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

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