Category Archives: Green

Fun Facts About Familiar Colors

Color. It defines our reality, evokes emotion, can affect our choices, and makes a difference in the way we look. All of us are familiar with the primary colors, but this post reveals some little-known facts that may surprise you.

Red:

Red is usually associated with power and passion. It is vibrant, daring, and attracts attention. For instance, think about the responses drawn by red cars and crimson lipstick.

Fun facts about red:

  • Although it’s widely believed that red capes make bulls angry, the reality is that bulls are colorblind. In this instance, the red lining is meant to conceal any bloodstains.
  • Seeing a red object can make your heart beat faster.
  • In China, brides wear red wedding dresses for good luck.
  • There are approximately 23 different shades of red crayons.

Orange:

The artist Wassily Kandinsky once said, “Orange is red brought nearer to humanity by yellow.” It’s one of those colors people love or hate. Vibrant and engaging, it is the only color of the spectrum that gets its name from an object- in this case the orange fruit.

Fun facts about orange:

  • In France, the middle traffic light is orange.
  • In Hindu tradition, orange is an auspicious and sacred color.
  • Orange is both the name and emblematic color of the British royal family.
  • The ‘black boxes’ on aircraft are really bright orange so they can be located more easily.

Yellow:

German writer and statesman Johann von Goethe said in 1840, “With yellow the eye rejoices, the heart expands, the spirit is cheered and we immediately feel warmed.’ The same holds true today: yellow is associated with optimism and enlightenment.

Fun facts about yellow:

  • Although yellow is considered a peaceful color, people lose their tempers more frequently in yellow rooms.
  • Legal pads are yellow because it improves concentration ability.
  • 75% of the pencils sold in the U.S. are yellow.
  • A yellow flag indicates a medical quarantine.

Green:

Green is not just a color anymore; it is a symbol of environmentally friendly products, buildings, and lifestyles. Green has represented growth, regeneration, and fertility since the beginning of time.

Fun facts about green:

  • People waiting to appear on TV wait in ‘green rooms’ because the color can soothe a bad case of the nerves.
  • Hospital decor is usually green because it calms patients.
  • Seamstresses won’t use green thread before a fashion show, fearing it can cause bad luck.
  • Brides in the Middle Ages wore green to represent fertility.

Blue:

Blue is one of the most popular colors. It causes the human body to produce calming chemicals, which is why it’s often used in bedrooms. Blue is also gender-neutral, appealing to both men and women equally.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Fashion consultants recommend wearing blue to job interviews because it represents loyalty.
  • Weightlifters can lift heavier weights in blue-walled gyms.
  • Workers are more productive in blue rooms.
  • Blue plates make food appear less appealing: a note to dieters!

Indigo:

We have Isaac Newton to thank for adding indigo to the color spectrum. He wanted the number of colors to match the seven-tone musical scale of Rene Descartes, so indigo was chosen to bring the color spectrum count to seven.

Fun facts about blue:

  • Black light turns ripe bananas a bright indigo color.
  • During the Elizabethan era, only royalty, nobility, and members of the Council could legally wear indigo.
  • Indigo is often called ‘royal’ blue.
  • The Virgin Mary is frequently depicted wearing indigo clothing.

Purple:

Because it appears so rarely in nature and is expensive to create, purple has a powerful history that has evolved with the centuries. It is the most powerful wavelength of the rainbow and denotes wealth and sophistication.

Fun facts about purple:

  • The Romans used to extract an essence for making purple by boiling thousands of marine snails.
  • In some cultures, purple is the color of mourning.
  • Only two of the world’s flags contain purple.
  • In Italy, performers refuse to go on stage wearing purple.

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Color helps Human’s Heal with SMART Bandages

Red means stop and green means go. This has been true for some time and is widely accepted, probably because traffic signals reinforce this behavior on a daily basis. Now these colors are being used to determine if a human wound is healing or not. SMART bandages turn green when oxygen is flowing to wounds and red if oxygen is low.

This is important technology because wounds need sufficient amounts of oxygen to fully heal. However, until now, most bandages actually restrict oxygen flow and hide the healing process, leaving wounds susceptible to unseen complications. With this new “paint-on” translucent bandage, an individual and his or her physician can easily monitor the wound’s healing process.

The creator of the bandage, Conor L. Evans, an assistance professor at Massachusetts General Hospital (at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine) and Harvard Medical School, considers the color changing technology to be a sort of mapping system. For right now, the SMART bandage maps “a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration.” But this is only part of the bandage’s purpose.

SMART is an acronym for Sensing, Monitoring and Release of Therapeutics. Right now, sensing and monitoring are available thanks to easy-to-follow color changing technology; in the future, the bandage may be capable of “automatically [delivering] drugs at the wound site.”

The transparent liquid bandage displays a quantitative, oxygenation-sensitive colormap that can be easily acquired using a simple camera or smartphone. Image: Li/Wellman Center for Photomedicine

The transparent liquid bandage displays a quantitative, oxygenation-sensitive colormap that can be easily acquired using a simple camera or smartphone. Image: Li/Wellman Center for Photomedicine

For now, the bandage uses a viscous liquid that includes phosphors. Phosphors are in many glow-in-the-dark products because they “absorb light and then emit it via a process known as phosphorescence,” explains rdmag.com. This liquid is painted on the first wound. In conjunction with a different top coat, it creates an air-tight sealant that protects the wound while monitoring airflow. Then, a camera is used to activate the phosphor and capture a reading of current oxygen levels (i.e. a map of reds and greens) throughout the wound. Any camera can trigger this process—even a smartphone.

There is no telling when or if color changing bandages will be sold over-the-counter. The research for SMART bandages has been driven by an admirable goal: to help wounded soldiers. SMART bandages may soon go into field testing in efforts to “significantly improve the success of surgeries to restore limbs and physical functions.”

On a large scale, the sensing and monitoring bandage may be the start of precise wound healing. On a small scale, it is pretty cool that a translucent bandage may change color, and in effect, help humans heal.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

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Crisp Imagery through Color Enhancing Technology

3a Crisp Imagery through Color Enhancing TechnologyWhen you look at an image, it is safe to assume that you are seeing it through three color sensors: green, blue, and red. Can you imagine seeing an image through 12 times the amount of sensors?

The University of Granada in Spain and Polytechnic University of Milan, Italy, recently unveiled design plans for a “multispectral imaging system capable of obtaining information from a total of 36 colour channels.”

The Polytechnic University of Milan is responsible for creating the sensors, known as Transverse Field Detectors (TFD). These sensors “…are capable of extracting the full colour information from each pixel in the image without the need for a layer of colour filter on them.” The Color Imaging Lab at the University of Granada has created a system that enhances these sensors and puts all 36 color channels to good use.

While this technology will be available to medical and government industries at first, there is a good chance it will someday transform the images we see on our mobile devices and personal computers.

The digital devices we use every day currently have color image sensors limited to the basic three color channels. As you can imagine, this impacts how we perceive color and lessens the quality of the images we see. If our handheld devices and personal computers offer 36 color channels someday, the colors we see onscreen will appear true to life.

Before this technology makes it into our homes it will be used for important activities that depend on poignant but stubborn details, like medical imaging and detecting counterfeit currency.

3b Crisp Imagery through Color Enhancing TechnologyFor now the technology is making it easy to facilitate the “capture of multispectral images in real time.” According to Wikipedia, “A multispectral image is one that captures image data at specific frequencies across the electromagnetic spectrum. The wavelengths may be separated by filters or by the use of instruments that are sensitive to particular wavelengths, including light from frequencies beyond the visible light range, such as infrared.”

The Principal Investigator on this project is thrilled about the potential TFD technology has to “…turn the light they receive into electric signals.” He believes that this technology will aid and advance a variety of industries and research fields.

Even though the technology is young, trials of the Transverse Field Detectors are taking place in locations like the USA.

Learn more about the research that is leading the way to crisper imagery through color enhancing technology:

Imaging Resource

University of Granada

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Colors of Cancun

What happens in Cancun doesn’t necessarily stay in Cancun. People love to share pictures of their Mexico vacations on their social networks. Throughout the blogosphere a common praise is repeated about Cancun: it is full of color.

    • Cancun Quintana Roo, Mex. © Aaron Rodriguez

      © Aaron Rodriguez

      I have never experienced sunset in this way before. The colors are simply delightful.

–        Worth a Thousand Words

    • This is how blue the water was, without help from photoshop…

–        Ever Lovely

    • The best way to appreciate [the peculiar colors of Cancun] is to rest on the beach, enjoying the nature around you, letting it amaze you with the most incredible panoramas.

–        Hyatt Regency Cancun

Natural Colors

Why are the colors of Cancun so enchanting? Some say, aside from beautiful sunsets and white sandy beaches, that Cancun is mainly water and jungle. Even though many visitors only see the tips of textured greens that exist in the jungle, they note how the shade of the jungle is a sharp contrast from the brilliant exposure of the ocean.

Cultural Colors

Plush foliage surrounds the ancient Mayan ruins and brings the history of Cancun to life. People visit these artifacts and are fascinated by the stories locals and tribesmen tell. The distinct look of Mexico’s native people is also rooted in color. Their brown skin, dark eyes and black hair are very distinct. Most carry the stories of Mayan culture with pride and some boast the green, red and white of the Mexican flag as well.

Oceanic Colors

Private Beach at Rui Caribe Cancun Mexico  © cgt

© cgt

Tourists tend to visit the ruins at certain times during their holiday but try to spend much of their time on the beach, too. The colors of Cancun’s water are rich blues. On Pink Shore’s blogger recently wrote, “…the blue water went on for days it was so beautiful!”

Even those who have yet to visit Cancun can attest to the fact that this destination is full of color. During springtime, social networks come alive with pictures posted from Cancun. It is one of the most popular spring break destinations for people in North America and other parts of the world. People seem drawn to Cancun for its warm weather and promise of relaxation, but those who truly experience the colors of Cancun are the ones who leave refreshed. Even though their holidays end, Cancun doesn’t easily leave them. The colors live on in their pictures and memories.

 

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The Color Green: Many Shades, Many Meanings

When people share their favorite colors, green seems to be a popular pick. But it doesn’t need to be favored for people to notice it. Green is everywhere.

The Many Shades of Green

In its natural form, green is seen in the grass and trees. What about the shades of green that exist in between?

When green is combined with hints of other colors it can be powerful. For instance, green with some blue creates a vibrant shade which is often associated with growth. Here are some other shades of green that evoke strong feelings, too.

  • Green and brown is a popular choice when it comes to camouflage patterns.
  • Green with hints of orange and yellow is a great shade in springtime. It is often seen with fruits and fresh foods.
  • When purple is added to green, the hue becomes rich and stylish. Certain fashion trends ensure this green is often the focal point of seasonal lines.

Green is everywhere. It is evident in almost anything. It can be warm or cool, dark or bright. But the roots of this color go deeper than what meets the eye. In many cultures, green is a symbol people hold dear. Green represents great characteristics of nature like balance, harmony and stability.

Using Green for Home Décor

Ancient traditions are known to use shades of green in their décors. Feng Shui is a popular practice that calls on the natural elements of green. The Chinese philosophy of Feng Shui relies of harmony. This means that green is used often to offer perfect balance to other elements.

One place where it is recommended to use green is the front door. It is believed that the front door sets the tone for the entire house. In China, green is linked to an abundant life. Growth, sunrise and other signs of renewal are also associated with green. Painting a front door with this hue is a great way to share positivity with the world.

What do you see when you are face to face with the color green? Do you take time to appreciate the color of nature all around you? Stop and look. Green is everywhere. When you take time to notice it, recognize the effect this color has on you. Does it renew your energy and refresh your soul? If yes, it may soon become your favorite color.

Read more Segmation blog posts about the color green: 

Green Represents Saint Patrick’s Day

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Welcome Spring with a Freshly Painted Front Door

door,red,blue,color,home,spring,yellow,change

Spring is here, and with it will come a plethora of beautiful colors. The May flowers that April showers bring display lovely shades of red, purple, yellow and blue. With the wave of new life and vibrant color that is soon-to-come, many homeowners will be thinking about Spring cleaning as a preparation for Summer. In addition to thoroughly cleaning, giving your home an external “makeover” would be the ideal activity to welcome Spring. Believe it or not, simply painting your front door can drastically change the appearance of your entire home and make it the feature of your neighborhood.

Painting your front door is perhaps the most inexpensive way to change the look and feel of your house. The colors you have to choose from are endless, but some of the most popular front door shades include:

— Yellow — This bright and sunny hue inspires feelings of happiness, warmth and joy. Yellow is the ideal shade of door paint for a home that is a drab color (such as grey). Painting your front door yellow is definitely the best way to make your home “pop” and stand out to visitors.

— Red — Warm, sultry, passionate — these are all words that are associated with the color red. Applied to a front door,red,blue,color,home,spring,yellow,change door, red truly makes a statement. Interestingly, early American homes with red doors were thought to be exceptionally welcoming. Those drawn to Americana-style decor will likely love the look of a bright red front door.

— Green — Homeowners who are ready for a fresh start and a renewed sense of vitality might want to opt for a green door. Mint and lime are two colors that have been wildly popular lately; these shades are sure to bring a house to life and cause visitors to feel refreshed.

— Blue — Did you know that blue is one of the most stunning front door hues for brick homes? Blue also looks beautiful against natural siding. Those who are ready to quickly and inexpensively change the look of their home should consider a vibrant shade of blue for their front door.

What color is your front door? If you could paint your entryway door any shade in celebration of Spring, what color would you choose? Share with Segmation by leaving a comment below.

Sources:

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/6861936/list?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u227&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery12

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Green Represents Saint Patrick’s Day

green,color,saint patrick's day,colors,holidays,parade

Have you ever noticed the tremendous role that color plays in representing and enriching certain holidays? For example, can you imagine Christmas without red holly berries and green pine trees? Or Halloween without orange pumpkins? Chanukah would certainly not be the same if white and blue were not its representative colors. There is no doubt that erasing traditional colors from holidays would change the depth of meaning of those special days, as well as our feelings toward them.

Green is the unforgettable color that has forever marked Saint Patrick’s Day and made it distinct and memorable. Saint Patrick’s Day, which began being celebrated by Irish immigrants to the U.S. in the 1700’s, was originally linked to the color blue. Green was adopted as the holiday’s main color later, in honor of “the Emerald Isle.” The clover, which Saint Patrick himself would use to his illustrate his teachings about Catholicism, is another of Ireland’s symbols that inspired the color green.

Most everyone wears green clothing on Saint Patrick’s Day. Those who don’t know they are in danger of being pinched. This tradition came from the Irish belief that wearing green renders one invisible to leprechauns, who will apparently pinch anyone they are capable of seeing (i.e., those not in green).

Today’s Saint Patrick’s Day celebrations are characterized by the color green. They often feature green drinks, green food, and green decor. The city of Chicago even dyes its river green each year for the Saint Patrick’s Day green,color,saint patrick's day,colors,holidays,parade Parade! The parade is a festive affair, with individuals from all over the world in attendance. Last year’s Saint Patrick’s Day Parade goers enjoyed “unseasonably perfect” weather in Chicago, and were reported to have had an excellent time.

What would Saint Patrick’s Day be like without the color green? It would still hold the same historical meaning, but would not have that special feeling that the much loved holiday evokes. Do you feel that colors “make” a holiday? What colors represent what holidays to you? Segmation would love to hear your thoughts on the connection between holidays and color. Feel free to share your ideas with us in the “comments” section below. Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/18/st-patricks-day-in-chicag_0_n_1357073.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/15/st-patricks-day_n_1348003.html

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