Category Archives: Drawing

Learn to Draw in a Short Period of Time

Is it possible for someone to learn to draw in a short period of time? More specifically, can one learn to draw well in a matter of weeks?

Dr. Betty Edwards would say, without hesitation, yes.

Can a Book Quickly Teach Someone to Draw?

In the 1970‘s, Edwards authored a booked titled Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Since the book’s release in 1979, it has sold over 2.5 million copies. The book’s popularity is due largely to the fact that its exercises garner results that any aspiring artist craves: the quick acquisition of skills necessary to draw beautifully.

Targeting the Right Brain is Key in Picking up Artistic Skills

The theory behind Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is simple: tapping into the right side of the brain via practicing certain exercises can increase a person’s ability to swiftly obtain the artistic skills required for drawing. Concerning the right/left brain theory, scientist and neurosurgeon Richard Bergland said, “…your left brain is your verbal and rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts to numbers, letters and words… your right brain is your nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or pictures.”

Because the right brain thinks in patterns and pictures and is non-verbal, it makes sense that primarily using that side of the brain when learning to draw would increase the chances of successfully gaining artistic skills.

This Simple Exercise Can Help You Learn to Draw

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is packed with tools that target the right brain and teach drawing skills. Here is just one exercise that can help you begin your journey of learning to draw; the exercise is called “Breaking Up Space”:

  • Only draw vertical and horizontal lines
  • Do not think in terms of words
  • Relax
  • Draw at a slow to medium pace
  • If you run out of space just retrace the lines you have already drawn

This exercise “helps put the left side (of the brain) to sleep and exercises the right side.” It’s important not think in words while practicing this. Using this technique is a first step you can take to begin to get your right brain accustomed to being used somewhat independently of your left brain. This creates an ideal mental environment for learning to draw.

Besides her book, Dr. Edwards also offers other materials that foster right-brained learning of artistic skills. These resources include DVDs, workshops, and more.

Are you a natural when it comes to drawing? If not, have you always wanted to learn to draw? Has intimidation discouraged you from trying? Share with us in the comments box below.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Gregg Visintainer Finds an Emotional Outlet in Drawing

Figure Drawing Tips

Tips for Improving your Landscape Drawing Skills

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Behind the Scenes with Segmation: Meet Digital Artist Marta Guijarro De Luna

Artwork comes in all shapes an sizes. Segmation prides itself on offering a variety of digital paint-by-number patterns. Thanks to our digital artists, we are able to distribute new, colorful collections every month.

This month, we have the pleasure of interviewing digital artist Marta Guijarro De Luna.

Marta has designed a number of Segmation’s pattern sets. Some of her recent creations include aerial vehicles and winter sports.

                  

“Life is not about finding yourself, it’s about creating yourself”
– 
George Bernard Shaw

What is your art background? Did you go to university or teach yourself?

I studied art history at the University of Valencia in Spain. I’ve always loved drawing, but before entering college, I was only able to take one sculpture drawing course at Barreira Academy (an academy of drawing in Valencia) for two months during the summer. I learned everything else on my own through countless hours of drawing, trying different techniques (pencil, watercolor, etc.).

When I finished college, I had the opportunity to join a production company where I learned the basics of animation. Soon I was able to work on some of their productions like an animated TV show and an animated feature film. That’s how I began my career in the world of animation.

By that time, my professional life started to move in a different direction and I had to set aside my pencils for some time. I thought drawing would be something I’d never get back to. But, unexpectedly, I had the opportunity to work on a cartoon TV show and after several years I got out my pencils and made a career in the field of illustration. Since then, I’ve been lucky to straddle the path between illustration and animation worlds.

      

Marta’s artwork can be printed on t-shirts, prints, phone cases, mugs, stickers and other goodies. ALAPAPAJU is available now on Society6 and Redbubble.

 “The way to get started is to stop talking and start doing”
-Walt Disney

When did you know you wanted to be an artist?

When I was a little girl I remember saying that I wanted to be an artist or work for Disney.

Other Segmation Sets by Marta

Medieval Friends

 

Ground Vehicles

“Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working”
-Pablo Picasso

Was there a person or people in your life who encouraged you to be an artist?

Definitely! My family, especially my parents have believed in me from the beginning and always encouraged me to work on projects that were related to drawing and illustration. In their opinion, it was easy to copy something but to create something new from scratch was something that not everyone was able to do. My father, an architect, served as a great critic and helped me polish my drawings, helping me get proportions and perspectives just right. Also I found support from my brothers whenever I needed it. And my boyfriend, who made me pick up again the pencils and encouraged me to take on new challenging projects.

demo reel 2009 from martasan on Vimeo
(Marta is currently working on an updated version of her demo reel. It will include her most recent work on an animated feature film and an animated story for Ipad. For now, enjoy watching her past animation work.)

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist when we grow up”
-Pablo Picasso

We hope you enjoyed meeting Marta, digital artist for Segmation. Follow Segmation on Facebook and Twitter to see what pattern set Marta will create next.

Read more Segmation blog posts about inspiring artists:

The Artist Who Wants to Banish Fear of Color

FEATURED ARTIST: OMASTE WITKOWSKI

The Creative, Artistic and Inventive Mind of Leonardo da Vinci

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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Gain Clarity and Creativity, Job Search by Color

Segmation Dewey Color System TestHow important is creativity to you? Do you enjoy expressing your creativity by incorporating art activities into everyday life? Do you try to be artistic at least once a week? Many times per month? Or whenever there is spare time in your busy schedule?

People who identify themselves as artistic often make time for creative expression on a regular basis. Unfortunately, a job can get in the way of spending time exploring these passions. Because of this, it is important to find a place of employment that compliments your unique energy and artistic flare. When working in an environment that hinders such expression, the creative spirit can wither away. As an artist, this can be harmful to your self-esteem and life satisfaction.

Have you struggled to balance your work life and creative ambitions? Many artists work full time jobs, and pursue other ventures they are passionate about outside work hours. Is this you? If so, does keeping up this busy schedule seem exhausting? A good solution is to work at a job, and in a position that speak to your creative nature.

Whether this means changing how you work in your current role, or searching for a new job that utilizes your artistic abilities, it is important for you to infuse your work world with unique creativity.

This is the very thought behind the Color Career Counselor, a popular assessment offered by Careerpath.com. This short test directs individuals to ideal jobs based on personal color preferences.

This test is created by Dewey Sadka, the author of The Dewey Color System (http://www.amazon.com/The-Dewey-Color-System-Choose/dp/1400050626). In a complimentary article, the short test is described as a tool you can use to find a job that speaks to your creative nature “by determining which primary, secondary and achromatic colors you prefer most and least.” The results of this test can enlighten you to understand:

  • Your unique approach to work.
  • Which work environments and career paths best suit your personality.
  • How you accomplish goal-oriented tasks and fulfill job expectations.

If you are searching for a job, or looking for a purposeful career, this full assessment may help guide you towards a place of employment that is in line with your personality and artistic interests.

Do you seek to gain clarity and creativity within your career? Let your favorite colors lead the way.

Sources:

Coming Soon:

Did you know that you can decorate your home office to inspire creativity? It’s true.

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Gregg Visintainer Finds an Emotional Outlet in Drawing

 art,gregg visintainer,drawing,ink,artist,companies,drawings

Most artists would agree that art is an emotional outlet of epic proportions. Art is truly miraculous in the way that it helps people process through difficulties. The amazing thing is that even when art is created in hard times, it somehow always turns out beautiful in some way. This is especially true if the artist created the art work from an authentic place emotionally. Gregg Visintainer is an artist who can identify with the idea that art is an emotional outlet. Not only that, for Gregg art has also become a major form of income.

Gregg Visintainer has been drawing since he was a child. In school the young artist would use his class time to perfect his art of drawing. While he loved drawing, Visintainer wasn’t convinced he could make a career out of it. As a result of this belief, Gregg essentially gave drawing up after high school.

When he was 24, after 6 years away from creativity, Gregg picked his art back up and began drawing again. This rebirth of art was brought on by an emotionally difficult time in Visintainer’s life. During this time he drew a piece titled “Lonely World.” This drawing took approximately 250 hours and 3 months to complete. Gregg so enjoyed expressing his emotions through “Lonely World” that he continued drawing, eventually establishing a company called Viz Art Ink.

Viz Art Ink features drawings made of pen and ink. The drawings are complex and full of hidden meaning. From far off, a Viz Art Ink drawing appears to contain one primary image, but when one gets closer it becomes clear that there are “hidden pictures, words, messages, and a lot of meaning that relates to each theme.”

Gregg has quite a following of fans, but his talent has also been noticed by big name companies like Volcom, Element Skateboards, DC Shoes, Dregs Skateboards, Skinit, Grateful Dead, Falken Tires, and Disney. In fact, Gregg has worked with each of these companies in the past few years.  It’s clear that these major companies see the value in Gregg Visintainer’s dynamic pen and ink drawings.

Even when they have abandoned their art for a season, true artists tend to find their way home to art making eventually, even if it takes them a lifetime to do it. Things didn’t take so long for Gregg Visintainer. Are you an artist who once forfeited creating art, only to return to art making during a difficult season of life? Tell Segmation your story in the “comments” section below.

Sources:

http://www.vizartink.com/pages/about-us

Coming soon: Just how far can technology go in assisting creativity? Read our upcoming blog post to find out.

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How to Make Your Mistakes Work for You

Every artist knows the feeling of working for hours on a piece, only to make some kind of mistake. Whether it’s spilling paint, making a mark that can’t be erased, or stepping back and realizing that your drawing is out of proportion – we’ve all been there at some point. But when you goof up, does it mean that your artwork is ruined? Not necessarily!

Here are some tips that can help save your artwork after you’ve made a mistake that you can’t undo:

  • Cover over it. This is probably your first impulse, so ask yourself, “Is there a way to cover this mistake?” If you’re painting in acrylics, you can cover over it. But if you’re working in watercolors or colored pencil, covering over mistakes is not an option. In that case…
  • Work the mistake into the composition. Do all you can to make the mistake blend into the artwork, so that it seems like an intentional part of the piece. This may require you to…
  • Embrace the unexpected. Ask yourself, “How can I adjust my original vision for the piece to incorporate this unexpected addition?” You might surprise yourself, as this can produce a very creative approach that you may not have otherwise taken.

Above all, don’t panic. Art is a process of creation, one that requires a balance between control and letting go. By letting go and welcoming whatever happens, you free your creative flow and allow your muses to guide you.

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