Category Archives: color theory

Easter Egg Decorating Project Can Teach Kids About Color

Easter is fast approaching, and with it comes the promise of chocolate bunnies, baskets full of goodies, and colorful Easter eggs. There is perhaps no Springtime project kids (and adults) enjoy more than decorating Easter eggs.

Creating beautiful Easter eggs isn’t just fun; it is also educational. In fact, you can use an Easter egg project to teach kids about primary and secondary colors. Read on to find instructions for this activity.

Note: You will need vinegar, food coloring (blue, yellow and red), an egg rack or egg carton and egg spoons for this project.

imagesEducational Easter Egg Project Instructions:

1. Briefly explain to your students what primary and secondary colors are.

2. Take three clear glasses or plastic cups and fill them with water. Using food coloring, color one glass of water red, one blue, and the other yellow. (You will need about 20 drops of food coloring to make a bright color.) Reiterate to students that these are primary colors.

3. To demonstrate color mixing, have a student pour the primary colors (in equal parts) into another clear cup or glass; the three combined primary colors will create a dark brown/black hue. Explain to the students that colors mix together to make other colors.

4. Next, have a student mix equal part blue and yellow water to make green, red and yellow water to make orange, and red and blue water to make violet. Explain that orange, green and violet are secondary colors and are made by mixing primary colors.

5. By now you should have glasses of orange, violet, green, black, red, blue, and yellow water. These are the colors you will use to shade your Easter eggs.

6. Add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to each cup of colored water.images-1

7. Have students take turns dunking one cooled, hard boiled egg into each cup. (It is easiest to place eggs onto an egg spoon before dunking.) Have the students leave eggs in the colored vinegar water for at least 3 minutes before removing them. The longer an egg is in the colored water, the more vibrant the resulting hue will be.

8. Instruct students to remove eggs and gently place them on a wire rack or an egg carton. After the eggs dry, create an Easter egg display or let each student take an egg home.

Coloring Easter eggs is a fun, easy Springtime tradition. It is also an excellent activity for teaching kids about primary and secondary colors and color mixing.

Do you enjoy coloring Easter eggs? What is your favorite childhood memory of Easter egg decorating? Share with us in the comments box below.

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Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades – What’s the Difference?

Who Creates Color TrendsLet’s face the facts: we can easily take color for granted. Even when we are enjoying the brilliant hues of nature and the masterful shades in paintings, it is hard to be fully aware of the colorful intricacies we are taking in.

Case in point: do you know the difference between hues, tints, tones and shades?

To some, it comes as a shock to learn that these colorful qualities make up multiple tiers of the color wheel.

Basic and Intricate Elements of the Color Wheel

At first glance, the color wheel is a tool that guides us in using primary, secondary and complementary colors. But it also does much more than this. It describes analogous colors (any three colors that sit side by side), split complementary colors (which considers the two colors adjacent to a complimentary hue), and tetradic colors (a group of four colors, made up of two complimentary colors).

Beyond defining aesthetic color combinations, the color wheel also offers a good starting point from which tints, tones and shades can be properly identified.

The color wheel at its most basic form is made up of 12 hues. Hues are pure colors. When white is added to hues, they lighten and become known as tints. When gray is added to hues, they dim and become known as tones. When black is added to hues, they darken and become shades.

This excellent image, compliments of lifehacker.com, shows the many levels of the color wheel:

Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good

Using Hues, Tints, Tones and Shades

Different tiers of the color wheel come in handy when decorating, designing graphics, deciding on outfits or preparing works of art. For instance, matching a hue with its complementary shade can make for a dynamic combination. Sometimes, people find hues to be strong and bold. They may prefer light, more whimsical tints or are drawn to the calmer depths of shades.

More so, it can be nice to use one hue and its tints, shades and tones. This creates a monotone chromatic color scheme. In the same vein, a monotone achromatic color scheme uses all variations of neutral colors and can be brought to life with a brilliant hue.

Did you know the color wheel was so intricate? To learn more about the differences between hues, tints, tones and shades, as well as learn how to pick the best looking combinations for your wardrobe, home décors and art projects, check out this blog post: http://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-color-theory-to-know-what-looks-goo-1608972072.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel, but the most important thing to know is it won’t steer you wrong.

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Basic Color Theory – Color Matters

Color Wheel

The world is filled with infinite shades of color, from a candy-apple-red sports car to a smoldering orange sunset to the crisp green of springtime grass. The popular color wheel simplifies the shades into 12 distinct colors to help illustrate the variations.

Arranged in a circle with 12 sections, the wheel presents a visual representation of the primary colors in the following order: blue, blue/green, green, yellow/green, yellow, yellow/orange, orange, red/orange, red, red/purple, purple, blue/purple. The colors are arranged in a chromatic sequence, with complementary shades opposite one another. These are all of the standalone colors that cannot be created by mixing other hues. Secondary and tertiary hues can then be created by mixing three primary colors (traditionally red, yellow, and blue).

The color wheel is further segmented into active and passive hues. Active colors (reds, oranges, yellows) will appear as more dominant when placed against passive shades, while the passive colors (purples, blues, greens) appear to recede when viewed near the active ones.

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Can Color Exist in the Dark?

Can Color Exist in the Dark (c) tlr3automatonColors add beauty and variety to the world around us. They are pleasant from every perspective – expect the dark. After all, color cannot be seen without light. Or can it?

Color is created when light reflects an object. Light waves cause this to occur and the frequencies at which they travel, fast or slow, determines color. For instance, red has a low frequency while purple has a high frequency. If there is no light, there can be no light waves and color cannot be seen.

This is true most of the time. There is only one exception: items that glow in the dark.

Glow in the Dark

Glow in the dark products contain phosphors. These chemical substances are known for their luminescent qualities. All phosphors have three characteristics. These traits include:

  • They need to be charged. Different glow in the dark objects require different types of energy to become charged. (This is why some items need to be held up to a light before glowing in the dark.)
  • Phosphors contain the “color of visible light that they produce.”
  • The persistence of the phosphor (or the length of time the product will glow).

After becoming charged, a phosphor will illuminate. This item can be seen in the dark where other colors cannot be seen.

We Use Phosphors Every Day

Toys “R” Us seems like the keeper of all-things glow in the dark. In everyday life these items seem far and few between. But adults use phosphors every day.

Television screens, computer monitors, and fluorescent lights all have phosphors. TV screens actually have thousands of phosphors that emit red, green, and blue. Fluorescent lights have many color combinations that make light look white.

Charging Items to Glow in the Dark

The charge that generates TV and lights comes from electricity. But other phosphors use different types of energy to charge. Much of the time, natural energy is used.

For instance, glow in the dark toys are often energized by normal light. To capture this charge and maintain it for some time, two phosphors are common: Zinc Sulfide and Stontium Aluminate. These chemical substances can be mixed in with plastic to create a toy that glows.

Some glow in the dark items do not need any charge. Take watches for example; a watch may use a combination of a phosphor and radioactive element. The radioactive part can continually charge the phosphor.

With phosphors, light can thrive in the dark. Better yet, items can glow.

Image made available by  tlr3automaton on Flickr through Creative Commons Licenses.

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Decorate Your Home Office to Inspire Creativity

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The past few years have been tough on the economy as well as on individual incomes. Because of the unstable job market, more and more people these days are turning to self-employment. Being your own boss and setting your own hours are not the only perks that come with being self-employed — having and decorating a home office is equally fun and rewarding. Your home office should inspire peace and tranquility, but should also be a place where creativity abounds. Does your home office need a makeover?

Did you know that you can decorate your home office to inspire creativity? It’s true. Consider the following color chart to decide what shades to paint and accessorize your office with:

Cools — If your job requires a great deal of mental clarity, try painting your office walls a cool shade. Blue should especially foster concentration. Sage is cool in hue as well as trendy, and would be a great choice for someone who desires a fashionable haven of clarity.

Earth tones — Do you need a sense of calm in your home office? How about an increased sense of organization? Consider an earth tone. Examples include white, deep grey, and hot chocolate. Earth-toned walls lend themselves perfectly to bright and cheery accessories (pillows, chairs, pictures, etc.).

Upbeat shades — Does your job require you to be constantly upbeat and in a good mood? If yes, an energizing shade would be best for your home office. Red is the definitive bold color that is known for getting blood pumping. You might also want to consider unusual color combinations, such as raspberry and turquoise or lemon and robin’s egg blue. office,home,color,consider,creativity,earth,job,amazing

It’s amazing the impact color can have on a room, and the effect a well-decorated home office can have on a person’s creativity and efficiency. If you’ve had trouble coming up with fresh ideas and innovations, consider making over your home office. You never know what impressive results will follow.

How is your home office decorated? Has it inspired creative ideas in you? Share with us by commenting on this Segmation blog post.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com/custompublishing/decorating-advice/chishop-picking-a-home-office-wall-color-20120323,0,3881708.story

http://colorchats.benjaminmoore.com/2012/04/the-best-colors-for-a-home-office/

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Use Color to Change Employees’ Job Performance

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Color can affect emotions.  

Color is a powerful thing. In fact, it has the ability to affect individuals’ emotions. Certain colors encourage specific types of behavior in people — nowhere is this more clearly demonstrated than in the workplace. What color have you chosen to decorate your office in? The hue that you surround your employees with may be affecting their job performance more than you know.

What colors enhance job performance?

Here are just a few examples of workplace paint shades that have powerful effects upon employees:

— Red — Most people know that red is a stimulating, empowering color that can increase workplace excitement. This is because the color red “can increase brain wave activities, as well as raise heart rates and respiration.” It would be best to accent a workplace with red, as an entirely red office space might be overwhelming to employees. If your workers need a boost of invigoration, red would be an ideal shade to utilize.

— Orange and Yellow — Did you know that orange is capable of increasing enthusiasm? It’s true. Yellow, another warm hue, can actually “stimulate memories” and make individuals feel a sense of welcome. These colors are best used as accents. Why? Because yellow has the potential to bring out frustration and anger, and orange may increase a person’s appetite.

— Blue and Green — Do your employees need a boost of hope and encouragement? If so, green or blue would be the perfect shades to implement in your office space. For high-stress environments, blue should be used because of its amazing ability to lower heart rates, respiration, and blood pressure. Green, which has been known to reduce anxiety, is another great choice for stress-provoking places of employment.

Color can help your employees in a number of ways. 

It’s clear that color can be helpful to individuals on many levels. Whether your employees would benefit from an atmosphere of peace, hope, inspiration, or determination, you can help them get their emotional needs met simply by investing in a new paint job for your office. Color truly is amazing!

Sources:

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/wall-color-effect-employees-17469.html

Coming soon: Do you work from home? If yes, learn to decorate your home office to foster personal inspiration by reading our next post.

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Color Can Help You Understand Personality Types

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Would you like to maximize your efficiency in the workplace? Not many people would answer “no” to that question. Everyone desires to work at their highest capacity and fulfill their professional potential. The unfortunate truth is co-workers sometimes make operating at this level in the workplace difficult or even impossible. However, understanding the professional personalities of your co-workers will help you get along with the individuals you see forty-plus hours a week, and in so doing maximize the time you spend in the office.

Did you know that personality types can be matched with certain colors? It’s true. When you regularly associate a person’s professional personality with a specific color, it becomes easy to remember how best to interact with that individual. Here is a quick reference for assigning colors to your co-workers:

– Gold — Inclusive of about 46 percent of all employed persons, gold is by far the most common professional personality hue. A gold individual is typically goal-oriented and skilled at organizing processes and people.

– Red — Who in your office is “action-oriented, spontaneous and focused on the now?” Put those individuals into the ‘red’ category. Reds are great at making the office a fun place to be. Somewhere around 27 percent of employed persons are red.

– Green — While only 17 percent of the working population is considered green, those who fall into this category are highly valuable. Greens are relational, often working in human resources or advertising. Greens are also usually creative and expressive.

– Blue — Most workplaces cannot get along without those who fit into the ‘blue’ category. Blues “are theoretical, always driven to acquire knowledge, and are good at dealing with complex systems.” Which of your co-workers would you say is blue?

Every professional personality type fits into a color category. It’s helpful to know what colors your co-workers are, but it’s equally vital to know where you fall on the color spectrum. Allowing color to provide you with an understanding of different personalities can help you achieve great success in the workplace and build good rapport with each of your coworkers.

Sources:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/bruzzese/2013/03/03/on-the-job-opposites-complement/1955659/

Coming soon: Whether it be pink, green, blue or yellow, your favorite color can actually help you find an ideal career to pursue.

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The Expressive Vincent van Gogh

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Vincent Van Gogh (1853 – 1890) was a Dutch painter whose Post-Impressionist paintings laid the groundwork for Expressionism, influenced the Fauves and greatly affected 20th century art.
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He created more than 2,000 works, including 900 paintings, three of which make up the world’s ten most expensive pieces of art.

Van Gogh was born in 1853 in Groot-Zundert, a village in the southern Netherlands. His father was a minister and three of his uncles were art dealers, two vocations that were to pull Vincent in different directions at various times in his life.

In letters, Vincent has described his youth as “gloomy, cold and barren,” and he left school at 15. With the help of his uncle, he was offered a job with the art dealer Goupil & Cie, and in 1873 was sent to London and from there to Paris. After complaining repeatedly about the commoditisation of art, his job with the art dealership was terminated and Van Gogh returned to England to work as a teacher and minister’s assistant.

In 1879, after failing a course at a Protestant missionary school near Brussels, Van Gogh began a mission in the poor mining district of Borinage in Belgium. Choosing to live in the same poverty-stricken conditions as the local population, he was dismissed for “undermining the dignity of the priesthood” and returned home. His behaviour over the following months led his father to enquire about having Van Gogh committed to an asylum.
Aged 27, Van Gogh eventually took up the suggestion of his brother Theo, now a successful art dealer, to focus on painting. In 1880, he moved to Brussels and studied at the Royal Academy of Art.

Van Gogh’s first major work, The Potato Eaters, was painted in 1885 shortly after his father’s death. Like many of his early works, the painting used sombre colors, especially dark brown, a preference which would make his paintings difficult to sell; buyers’ tastes were now influenced by the bright tones used by the Impressionists.

His palette however, began to change after he moved to Antwerp in 1885. He studied color theory and began using carmine, cobalt and emerald green. But it was while living in Paris from 1886 to 1888, where he met Emile Bernard and Toulouse-Lautrec and came into close contact with Impressionist art, that Van Gogh’s art really began to develop.

He experimented with Pointillism and painted in the sunflower-rich region of Arles with the artist Gauguin. By late 1888 his behavior was becoming difficult however, and fearing that Gauguin was going to abandon him, he stalked the painter with a razor before cutting off his earlobe and giving it to a local prostitute, telling her to “keep this object carefully.” The following year, after suffering from hallucinations and believing that he was being poisoned, Van Gogh was placed in the mental hospital of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole near Arles.

By now, Van Gogh’s work was beginning to be recognized. The critic Albert Aurier called him a “genius,” and Monet declared that his work was the best in a major avant-garde Brussels art show.www.segmation.com

The beginnings of success did nothing to help Van Gogh’s depression though, nor did the intervention of the physician Dr. Paul Gachet. On July 27, 1890, he walked into a field, shot himself in the chest with a revolver and died two days later.

Although there has been much speculation about the nature of Van Gogh’s mental illness, he is now recognized as one of the world’s greatest artists and a bridge between 19th century Impressionism and 20th century art.

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Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_van_Gogh

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