Category Archives: artistic device

Learn to Draw in a Short Period of Time

Is it possible for someone to learn to draw in a short period of time? More specifically, can one learn to draw well in a matter of weeks?

Dr. Betty Edwards would say, without hesitation, yes.

Can a Book Quickly Teach Someone to Draw?

In the 1970‘s, Edwards authored a booked titled Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Since the book’s release in 1979, it has sold over 2.5 million copies. The book’s popularity is due largely to the fact that its exercises garner results that any aspiring artist craves: the quick acquisition of skills necessary to draw beautifully.

Targeting the Right Brain is Key in Picking up Artistic Skills

The theory behind Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is simple: tapping into the right side of the brain via practicing certain exercises can increase a person’s ability to swiftly obtain the artistic skills required for drawing. Concerning the right/left brain theory, scientist and neurosurgeon Richard Bergland said, “…your left brain is your verbal and rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts to numbers, letters and words… your right brain is your nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or pictures.”

Because the right brain thinks in patterns and pictures and is non-verbal, it makes sense that primarily using that side of the brain when learning to draw would increase the chances of successfully gaining artistic skills.

This Simple Exercise Can Help You Learn to Draw

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is packed with tools that target the right brain and teach drawing skills. Here is just one exercise that can help you begin your journey of learning to draw; the exercise is called “Breaking Up Space”:

  • Only draw vertical and horizontal lines
  • Do not think in terms of words
  • Relax
  • Draw at a slow to medium pace
  • If you run out of space just retrace the lines you have already drawn

This exercise “helps put the left side (of the brain) to sleep and exercises the right side.” It’s important not think in words while practicing this. Using this technique is a first step you can take to begin to get your right brain accustomed to being used somewhat independently of your left brain. This creates an ideal mental environment for learning to draw.

Besides her book, Dr. Edwards also offers other materials that foster right-brained learning of artistic skills. These resources include DVDs, workshops, and more.

Are you a natural when it comes to drawing? If not, have you always wanted to learn to draw? Has intimidation discouraged you from trying? Share with us in the comments box below.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Gregg Visintainer Finds an Emotional Outlet in Drawing

Figure Drawing Tips

Tips for Improving your Landscape Drawing Skills

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How Well Do You Know The Color Wheel?

theory-wheels-3-6-12The color wheel is a tool used to identify relationships between colors. Also known as a color circle, the most popular organization of this artistic device includes primary, secondary, and tertiary colors.

Not only is the color wheel useful, it can also be fun. An interactive game created by Method of Action, an educational website for creative quizzes and peer feedback, allows individuals to test themselves on 6 elements of the color wheel.

The Most Popular Color Wheel

It is likely that you have seen a color wheel with 12 divisions, consisting of three primary colors, three secondary colors, and six intermediate (or tertiary) colors.

By using the test at http://color.method.ac/, you can explore how well you know color hues and saturation, in addition to complementary, analogous, triadic, and tetradic color combinations.

To best understand the results of your color wheel test, read more about what these terms represent.

6 Elements of the Color Wheel

               Hue is the main property of color. The common term stands for “pure color”. This means there is no black or white pigments added to give the color a tinted or shaded effect. Some unique hues include red, green, blue, and yellow.

               Saturation represents the brightness of a unique color. Often times, a color will become brighter when white pigments are added and dull when black is incorporated. This is how shades of a color are created. In addition, saturation brings about terms like, “light blue” and “dark blue”.

               Complementary colors exist opposite one another on the color wheel. It is said that putting complementary colors together can energize a color scheme. This is because there is a high contrast between colors like blue and orange, or red and green.

               Analogous colors sit adjacent, or next to one another, on a color wheel. These groupings are said to be “pleasing to the eye” and are often found together in nature. To create an analogous grouping within a color scheme it is important to have a hue be the main color.

               Triadic colors are schemes created by three colors that are spaced equally on the wheel. An example of a triadic color combination is red, blue, and green; between each color are two colors not included in the grouping.

               Tetradic color schemes are made up of four colors rather than three. These combinations are made of a primary color mixed with the secondary color placed next to it. Yellow-orange or blue-green may be seen in tetradic schemes.

There is so much to learn about the color wheel. To know more, read the other posts Segmation has published about the color wheel. They are listed below.

Also, be sure to head over to http://color.method.ac/ and take the color wheel test. When you are done, come back to this blog and share your results by leaving a reply on this post. We look forward to seeing how well you know the color wheel.

Sources: 

http://www.theverge.com/2012/1/24/2730597/method-of-action-color-game

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/01/test-your-color-matching-skills-quiz_n_2388079.html

More Segmation blog posts about the Color Wheel:

– Color Theory Basics: Color Combinations

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/02/27/color-theory-basics-color-combinations/

– Color Theory Basics: The Color Wheel

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/color-theory-basics-the-color-wheel-2/

– Introduction to Color Expert Johannes Itten

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/introduction-to-color-expert-johannes-itten/

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