Category Archives: artistic abilities

Learn to Draw in a Short Period of Time

Is it possible for someone to learn to draw in a short period of time? More specifically, can one learn to draw well in a matter of weeks?

Dr. Betty Edwards would say, without hesitation, yes.

Can a Book Quickly Teach Someone to Draw?

In the 1970‘s, Edwards authored a booked titled Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Since the book’s release in 1979, it has sold over 2.5 million copies. The book’s popularity is due largely to the fact that its exercises garner results that any aspiring artist craves: the quick acquisition of skills necessary to draw beautifully.

Targeting the Right Brain is Key in Picking up Artistic Skills

The theory behind Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is simple: tapping into the right side of the brain via practicing certain exercises can increase a person’s ability to swiftly obtain the artistic skills required for drawing. Concerning the right/left brain theory, scientist and neurosurgeon Richard Bergland said, “…your left brain is your verbal and rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts to numbers, letters and words… your right brain is your nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or pictures.”

Because the right brain thinks in patterns and pictures and is non-verbal, it makes sense that primarily using that side of the brain when learning to draw would increase the chances of successfully gaining artistic skills.

This Simple Exercise Can Help You Learn to Draw

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is packed with tools that target the right brain and teach drawing skills. Here is just one exercise that can help you begin your journey of learning to draw; the exercise is called “Breaking Up Space”:

  • Only draw vertical and horizontal lines
  • Do not think in terms of words
  • Relax
  • Draw at a slow to medium pace
  • If you run out of space just retrace the lines you have already drawn

This exercise “helps put the left side (of the brain) to sleep and exercises the right side.” It’s important not think in words while practicing this. Using this technique is a first step you can take to begin to get your right brain accustomed to being used somewhat independently of your left brain. This creates an ideal mental environment for learning to draw.

Besides her book, Dr. Edwards also offers other materials that foster right-brained learning of artistic skills. These resources include DVDs, workshops, and more.

Are you a natural when it comes to drawing? If not, have you always wanted to learn to draw? Has intimidation discouraged you from trying? Share with us in the comments box below.

Read more Segmation blog posts about art and color:

Gregg Visintainer Finds an Emotional Outlet in Drawing

Figure Drawing Tips

Tips for Improving your Landscape Drawing Skills

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Juan Gris Spanish Cubist Artist Testifies to the Power of Novelty

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José Victoriano (Carmelo Carlos) González-Pérez, known as Juan Gris, was born on March 23, 1887, in Madrid, Spain. At his birth, neither Gris’ Andalusian mother nor his Castlian father knew he would mature to become a highly influential leader in the art world. However, when Gris was between six and seven years old, his sister noticed his artistic abilities.

Juan Gris was educated at the School of Arts and Crafts in Madrid after receiving a “general education” earlier in life. Around this time Gris’ family experienced severe financial hardship. This was a blessing in disguise to Gris, who was catapulted into being a working artist as he sold his artwork to provide for his family. Soon after this, Gris began painting professionally.

Spanish painter Moreno Carbonero later became Gris’ primary teacher in painting. While in Carbonero’s studio, Gris immersed himself in artistic culture by actually living in community with writers and painters. This atmosphere was perfect for Gris’ maturation as an artist. Such Complementary Colors.

During the time that Juan Gris was in Moreno Carbonero’s studio, modern art began to become more prevalent in Spain. This was due in part to the infiltration of German art reviews and publications. Gris would later become a leader in “Modern-Style” art, namely Cubism.

In 1906 Juan Gris relocated to Paris to further pursue art. Magazines and newspapers bought Gris’ satirical drawings, enabling him to reside in Paris. While living in Paris, Gris befriended Georges Braque, Henri Matisse, and Fernand Léger.

Gris developed his personal style for several years, and then exhibited his work for the first time at Salon des Indépendants in 1912. Later that year he exhibited in Rouen, Barcelona, and Section d’Or (Paris). Growing in his personal cubist style and public popularity, Juan Gris sold works to individuals such as Gertrude Stein, Alfred Flechtheim, and Léonce Rosenberg.

As is the case with most artists, Juan Gris’ style evolved over time. Analytic cubism was the first style Gris acquired, but synthetic cubism became his focus around 1913. He created much collage art during this phase of his career.

Like Matisse, Gris used bright colors in his paintings. Though bold, Juan Gris’ paintings were and are clear and orderly. This order and clarity of style can be seen in the art of Amédée Ozenfan and Charles Edouard Jeanneret, whose works were inspired by Gris.

Gris demonstrated the breadth of his artistic abilities when he began designing sets and costumes for ballets under the watch of Sergei Diaghilev in 1924. Between 1924 and 1925, Gris gave a notable lecture, Des possibilités de la peinture, which expounded on his personal style. Around this time major art galleries in Berlin, Paris, and Düsseldorf exhibited Gris’ works. Without a doubt, Juan Gris had made his mark on the art world as a cubist painter.

Illness became a regular occurrence in Juan Gris’ life after the year 1925. Gris often suffered uremia and had cardiac problems. On May 11, 1927, Gris died in Paris. Renal failure was the cause of Gris’ death at the relatively young age of 40. Gris was survived by his wife, Josette, and his son, Georges.

Juan Gris was a man of extraordinary talent. The world took notice of Gris’ talent and embraced it, which moved Gris forward into fame and artistic prestige. With Gris’ art pieces selling for tens of millions of dollars, the art world is still acknowledging today the value of his work.

Cubist artist Juan Gris got a chance to live out what most artists only dream of. His life is one that continues to speak to generations about the power art holds when it is presented in a unique, organic form.

Sources:
http:// http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Gris
http://serdar-hizli-art.com/modern_painting/gris_juan.htm

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