Category Archives: Artist

Joshua Reynolds – English Portrait Painter

www.segmation.comJoshua Reynolds was a man with many titles: artist, painter, educator, president, and Sir. In the 18th century, the man with an extensive career fulfilled all these roles.

In the summer of 1723, Joshua Reynolds was born into a large family in Plympton, England. His parents had 10 children in all. Their heritage could be defined as intellectual; Joshua’s great-grandfather was a mathematician and his father, a school teacher.

Samuel Reynolds provided his son with a broad education. It included reading, writing, history, arithmetic, geography, and drawing. On his own efforts, Joshua gave attention to medicine, metaphysics, and astrology. More than any other activity, however, his greatest interest was painting.

It is believed that Reynolds began painting at a young age. His first portrait was signed the year he turned 12. Around 17, he apprenticed with the artist Thomas Hudson. This is where he began to acquire skill as a portrait painter.www.segmation.com

Joshua Reynolds started his independent career in 1743. In the beginning, his portraits included paintings of family members and himself. While much of his work showed signs of Hudson’s influence, his self-portraits revealed a Rembrandt quality.

In 1747, momentum built around Reynolds career. He set up a studio on St. Martin’s Lane in London. Most of his clients lived near the street that would become known for its art venues. During this time, his talent and connections bolstered his career; he was named “one of the nation’s most important artists” by The Universal Magazine.

On a tour through the Mediterranean and Rome in 1949, Reynolds was impressed by historical artwork. In fact, he was reported saying how ignorant he felt when viewing some of the world’s greatest art pieces. He copied many of these paintings and studied them often. His tour continued onto Florence where he spent a significant amount of time with Italian painter, Francesco Zuccarelli. He continued his travels, visiting places like Milan and Paris, before returning to London in late 1752.www.segmation.com

When Reynolds was settled into his St. Martin’s Lane studio again, he was said to produce more than 100 portraits each year. The value of his artwork increased as he was asked to paint portraits of elite society.

In 1768, his career as a portrait painted merged with the world of art education. Joshua Reynolds was elected the first president of the Royal Academy. There he gave many lectures that would eventually become a great book of art criticism known as, The Discourses on Art. One year after he took the role as president, Reynolds was knighted by George III. Later, in 1784, Reynolds became the portrait painter to George III.

Following these accolades, Reynolds health began deteriorating. He was hard of hearing and would become so deaf he required the assistance of an antique hearing-aid, the ear-trumpet. By 1789 his sight was waning too. Still, Reynolds was known for being a good listener, great friend, and generous man. He was never thought of as “handsome.” Reynolds was short in stature with a round, flushed face. He never married but had a lot of friends and was admired by many.
Eventually, liver disease took the life of a great artist, educator, countryman, and friend. Joshua Reynolds died in London in 1792.

Today, the legacy of Joshua Reynolds lives on. While his work is revered, his practices and teachings are indispensable to the world of art. Joshua Reynolds was a man of much talent but beyond all else he was a person with many strengths. Few other artists deserve his titles.

Sources:
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/500800/Sir-Joshua-Reynolds

http://www.nndb.com/people/898/000084646/

If you liked this Segmation blog post, we know you’ll enjoy:

— Joseph Mallord William Turner – Great Painter of Light

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/happy-birthday-april-23rd-to-joseph-mallord-william-turner-painter-of-light/

— Make Artist Famous with Hole-Punch Portraits

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/make-artist-famous-with-hole-punch-portraits/

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Joshua Reynolds English Portrait Painter

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

“The Pixel Painter”

The-Pixel-PainterHow would you respond to a losing your eyesight? What if physical limitations forced you to rethink your favorite activities? Could you adapt?

Setbacks can too easily keep us from doing what we love. More often than not it seems we are quick to accept restrictions and slow to persevere.

A 97 year old man is proving no obstacle – even blindness – needs to stop a pursuit of dreams. You are never too old to put art at the heart.

Who is “The Pixel Painter”

Hal Lasko suffers from wet macular degeneration. This type of visual impairment is age-related. The disease prohibits Hal from seeing fine detail. In fact, his vision has deteriorated to such a level that he is considered legally blind. Even though age-related macular degeneration causes trouble seeing straight ahead, Hal pursues artistic activities.

In his professional career, Hal Lasko was a type designer; an artist who created fonts. This allowed him to turn his attention to digital art. At that time, he did not know that a computer would later become his preferred medium for artwork.

Interestingly enough, there are no secrets or intricacies to the computer tool he uses to produce art. Hal uses one of the simplest apps: Microsoft Paint. On this program, Hal is able to enlarge portions of his design so he can see what he is doing.

It took him months to make the switch from brush to computer screen, but now he spends several hours a day creating detailed artwork. He creates beautiful landscapes with a digital look; they are beautiful and inspirational in unique ways.

Hal turns 98 this year. In honor of his birthday, all original work is available on http://www.hallasko.com/. Each piece is appropriately priced at $98.

To promote this special sale and chronicle the story of an artist, follow this link and watch Hal Lasko’s video interview: http://www.today.com/tech/legally-blind-97-year-old-makes-masterpieces-simple-paint-app-6C10732493.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art and Disabilities:

Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

How to turn your Passion into Profit

Art Beneath Your Feet

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC 

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Turrell does it right with Light Creates Space, Color, Perception and Art

www.segmation.comThe unique art of James Turrell infuses space with light. The artist makes entire rooms, museums, and even craters his canvases by transforming large areas into viewing experiences that manipulate how observers perceive their environments when natural and artificial lights alternate.

Turrell has been experimenting with light since 1966. He seems to be fascinated by the way light impacts how an individual understands space, perception, and even color. In relation, the American artist says this about the miraculous correlation:

“We teach the color wheel, but we really should speak about the light frequencies of each eye, and then the context of vision in which they reach the eye, because that’s how we perceive.”

This post explores James Turrell’s approach to art by briefly exploring how light manipulates space, how light changes perception, and the necessary relationship between light and art. At the conclusion, there are resources to inspire further exploration into this intricate subject.

Light Manipulates Space

Most people understand that light affects the way we see color and perceive the world around us. But is it comprehensible that light can manipulate space regardless of physical material? Turrell sets out to prove that a limited and definite space can be created without manmade parameters, like those set up with wood beams, steel rods, or concrete. This is because light itself creates space. When light stops so does vision. And when vision stops, so do the confines of a space. Turrell calls this, “using the eyes to penetrate the space.”

Light Changes Perception

This offers a little help in grasping how the absence or presence of light changes our perception of space. To further explain, Turrell points up. He says this earthly phenomenon is best understood by looking up to the atmosphere we experience every day.

In the light of the sun, it is impossible to see stars. However, as the sun goes down, an individual’s penetration of vision goes out, and the stars become evident again. Stars, which are constant in placement, are only visible lights when our eyes are able to perceive them as such. This can only happen when sunlight is mostly absent from our view.

Light and Art: A Relationship

Artists have always looked at the world with curious fascination and longing to use light as a means of creating space. This is why, when artists began using lights, shading, and perspective within paintings, the world marveled at how lifelike the images became. The reality is, like Turrell, artist have always seen what does not exist because they have brilliance all their own.

James Turrell’s first exhibition in a New York museum,  Guggenheim , since 1980, opens June 21 through September 25, 2013. James Turrell is also in Los Angeles at the Los Angeles County Museum until April 6, 2014.

To read more about the effects of life on art, follow the works and study of James Turrell. Here are some helpful links to begin this exploration:

If you enjoyed this Segmation blog post, you are sure to love:

-The Importance of Color Vision and Art

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/paint-by-number-color-vision-effects-art-appreciation/

– Are Your Colors What They Seem to be?

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/10/02/are-your-colors-what-they-seem-to-be/

– The Benefits of Making Art Outside

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/the-benefits-of-making-art-outside/

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on FacebookSegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Having fun with Easter Eggcitement Art & Crafts

www.segmation.com
Easter Eggcitement Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC released (see more details here)

We invite you to explore the Segmation™ World and Easter Eggcitement!
www.segmation.com

With Segmation™ technology, we’ve come up with various interactive coloring experience that’s enjoyable for all ages. Without lifting pen or brush, you can paint-by-number any digital photography or painting, from the crisply delineated to the intricately detailed. Segmation™ brings out the simple, beautiful essense of painting, whether you’re painting your own inspired designs or masterpieces of the other great artists.

Contemporary and traditional designs, decorations, logos, and even photographs work beautifully, and no artistic skill or technical ability is needed.

Easter is a major Christian religious festival celebrating Jesus’s resurrection from the dead. Many of the holiday’s cultural elements are celebrated by Christians and non-Christians around the world. These elements include the Easter bunny, Coloring Easter eggs, and Family Meals. Our Easter pattern collection includes many fun illustrations of the Easter holiday including bunnies, colored eggs, candles, and flowers. Sets included are Hopping Bunny, Eggs with Ribbons, Eggs and Paint, Eggs in a Nest, Eggs and Flowers, Ready to Deliver, Eggs and Candle, Basket of Eggs, Chicken Painting an Egg, Cross, Colored Eggs, Chicks and Eggs in a Basket, Easter Bunny Costume, Eggcitement, Easter Bunny, Hare, Colored Egg, Coloring Eggs, Basket of Eggs with Flowers, Rabbit, and Egg Candles.

This set contains over 20 paintable patterns.

Easter Eggcitement

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Easter Eggcitement from Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

www.segmation.com

www.segmation.comwww.segmation.com

        If you liked this Segmation blog post, we know you’ll enjoy:

–Piero della Francesca – Early Renaissance Artist

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/piero-della-francesca-early-renaissance-artist/

— Paul Cezanne – Post Impressionist

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/paul-cezanne-post-impressionist/

— Make Artist Famous with Hole-Punch Portraits

https://segmation.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/make-artist-famous-with-hole-punch-portraits/

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Make Artist Famous with Hole-Punch Portraits

There are many different mediums with which to create art. Some of those art constituents include various types of paint, chalk pastels, charcoal pencils, mosaic fragments, metals, and the like. But would you ever imagine that hole punch dots could be used to craft incredible portraits? An artist from the United Kingdom is proving to the world that these dots are definitely a worthy art medium.

Artist Nikki Douthwaite has made a practice of collecting hole punch dots for the past three years. After sorting them by shade, she uses the dots to create portraits, which are “inspired by magazine photos,” of pop icons. The artist was led to use this particular medium after studying Gorges Seurat (pointalist artist) in school.

How exactly does one craft a large portrait out of hole punch dots? The answer is, with patience and very carefully. Douthwaite uses tweezers to place the dots onto her canvas. She commented, “I use the dots like paint. I do different colors for the feel of the picture, and there are thousands of colors in each piece.”

According to the artist, the most time-consuming aspect of the portrait process is composing subjects’ hair. Facial features are reportedly “easy.” Oddly, Nikki Douthwaite admitted that “the younger and prettier (a subject is), the harder I seem to find it, as there seems to be less distinguishing features.” Douthwaite reported that each of her works of art takes 6 to 15 weeks to complete.

Some of Nikki Douthwaite’s portrait subjects include Marilyn Monroe, John Lennon, Jemi Hendrix, and Simon
Cowell. Monroe’s portrait required about 100,000 dots, whereas Cowell’s took an amazing 189,000 dots. The artist spent a liberal amount of time on all her pieces, include the portrait on John Lennon, which demanded 140,000 hole punch dots.

More and more artists are bringing art out of the box and demonstrating that the sky is truly the limit when it comes to art mediums. If hole punch dots are being used to create attention-grabbing art, imagine what other elements could be used to compose art that makes the world turn its head.

http://on.today.com/PQ7Ri4
If you like this Segmation blog, you may also enjoy:

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Thomas Kinkade Is Remembered Through His Artwork

Thomas Kinkade’s death on April 6th of 2012 came as a shock to both the art community and the public at large. Kinkade, known as “The Painter of Light,” was made famous by his works of art. His prints were wildly popular and sold millions. This is proven by the reported fact that 1 in 20 Americans has a Kinkade print in their home. Without a doubt, Thomas Kinkade was, and remains, a celebrated artist.

Though Kinkade is no longer with us, his art remains. His last work (from what is currently known) was shown in Cape May, New Jersey, at the Victorian Walk Gallery in August of 2012. The piece, “Away From It All,” displays a cottage in the woods, a crescent moon, and, of course, emanates painted light.

The Victorian Walk Gallery displayed “Away From It All” during “The Thomas Kinkade Legacy Celebration.” Patrick, Kinkade’s brother, gave a presentation about the painting at its showing. 3,000 people arrived at the Victorian Walk Gallery just three hours after the exhibit opened.

Some of the art world has in general never “taken” to Kinkade’s artwork. Although he has sold millions of dollars worth of prints, paintings, and merchandise, the topic of Kinkade’s art remains heated and controversial. Still, Thomas Kinkade received art training at the Art Center College of Design located in Pasadena. He also studied at the University of California at Berkeley. Kinkade was raised in Placerville, California.

Thomas Kinkade is well known for painting soft, lush, idyllic scenes. He often depicted streams, lovely homes, and nature settings. His passion for creating paintings that evoked emotions of peace is made evident by the artwork he crafted. The “light” that he is so noted for painting is the thread of continuity that runs throughout all his works.

Of his own work, the painter was reported to have said, “If people look at my work and are reminded of the way things once were or perhaps the way they could be, then I’ve done my job.” Kinkade’s family members and artwork will undoubtedly cause him to be remembered for generations to come.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/20/thomas-kinkades-last-know_n_1811090.html

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/04/07/artist-thomas-kinkade-dies-in-california-at-age-54/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2126413/Thomas-Kinkade-dead-Millionaire-painter-light-dies-aged-54.html

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter


Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Seeing the Soul of an Iceberg

Something or someone’s immortalization in a portrait is a testament to that individual or thing’s value and beauty. Down through the years people, some rich, some poor, and some of little consequence in the world’s view, have been captured in portraits. The artists that chose to portray these individuals have each seen something wonderful in their muses, something so worthy of attention that they wanted others to see it too. This is how portraitist Camille Seaman feels about her subjects: icebergs.

For eight years, Camille Seaman depicted icebergs in portraits. She first saw an iceberg on the Weddell Sea on a trip to Alaska. The sight of the iceberg shook Camille to her core and reminded her of her humanity and frailty. It also made Seaman desire to depict these mammoths in her own personal artwork and display them for all to see.

Photographing icebergs has become somewhat of a love affair for Camille Seaman. She doesn’t merely view icebergs as huge hunks of ice, as some do, but rather as living, breathing personalities. Seaman is blessed not to perceive things the way the average person does, or even the typical artist. Rather, she sees the way her grandfather instructed her to.

When Camille Seaman was a child, her grandfather taught her to view nature in a way that was consistent with her tribal heritage. He encouraged her to see the soul of an inanimate object. For example, he taught her to study a tree until it became as familiar to her as a “relative.” Ms. Seaman’s grandfather is partially responsible for her sensitive approach to her artistry and her depiction of icebergs.

Part of an artist’s job is to give people “new eyes” with which to see something. Giving others this gift enables them to venture beyond their own perceptions and journey into new possibilities of truth. An artist can give someone new eyes by presenting a subject in a fresh way. This is what Camille Seaman has done with icebergs, portraying them in such a manner as to give voice to their true personalities. This has helped many individuals see the true beauty and majesty that icebergs possess.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/11/icebergs-frozen-in-time-by-portraitist/?hp

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com

Sailboats are Examples of Recreational, Fun and Relaxing for Set Sail

Sailing is a method of moving and controlling a ship in water with large fabric foils called sails. With a small amount of skill and training (in addition to good weather and a bit of wind), a competent captain can adjust the sail rigging and control the rudder, and navigate through the water to a desired destination.

Though gradually replaced by ships with internal combustion engines, sailboats in many places are used as a recreational activity, with activities such as a racing and cruising. Set Sail patterns includes many photos of sailboats with sails trimmed in picturesque backdrops of sunsets, clear and cloudy skies, wooded shorelines, and calm waters. It allows one to Set Sail.

Become a Painter of Sailboats

Are you a sailboat lover? If so, have you ever considered painting them for yourself? Even if you don’t consider yourself an artist, you can be one today – see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Inspirational Tips to Boost your Artistic Creativity

At one point or another, all artists have felt as if their creativity suddenly dried up. Artistic block is the reason some of the most prominent individuals in the art world traveled abroad or locked themselves in a tiny studio. They were seeking artistic inspiration.

If you are looking for inspiration, this post is all about helping you discover a  muse to jump start your creative ambition.

Being an artist means you constantly have to assess yourself

Start by asking yourself a few questions.

  • At what point during the day do I feel most creative?
  • When throughout the day do I have the most energy?
  • When was the last time I had a moment to myself?
  • When was the last time I spent a decent amount of time away from my studio?

These questions will provide you with a baseline for boosting your creativity. They should help you discern which habits are conducive to your creativity, and which are deterring you from success.  Now let’s examine some specific ways you can seek out inspiration.

Here are some simple things you can do to jumpstart your creativity:

  • Do you keep an art-idea journal?  If you don’t already have one, an idea journal will help you start focusing ideas. Returning to your journal entries at a later date will come in handy should you encounter artistic block again.
  • When was the last time you cleaned your workspace? A little cleaning and organization might be just what you need to clear your head and find a fresh start.
  • When was the last time you thought about the mood of your studio? Try opening a window, relocating your easel or turning on the music. All of these small changes can offer you a new perspective and create an inspirational mood. Finding a new place to create for a day might help you tap into a different mindset.
  • When was the last time you engaged in your favorite hobby? You never know when an inspirational experience might come your way. Go out and try something new, or take the time to rediscover a beloved activity.
  • Have you connected with other artists lately? This website is founded on the idea that artists can inspire, and be inspired by, other artists http://artistsinspireartists.com/

We hope this post gives you a creative boost.  You can find more inspirational advice by visiting this website:  http://emptyeasel.com/art-business-advice/motivation/.

Be an Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

Segmation

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iPad

www.segmation.com

Benefits of Making Your Own Paints

Did you know that you can easily and affordably make your own paints right at home? The supplies needed to make oil paints, acrylics, watercolors or pastels are fairly inexpensive and they can be easily purchased online or at a local shop. You don’t need a giant studio or an excessive amount of supplies to make your own paints – all you need are a few basic ingredients pertinent to each medium, and a tabletop that you can use as your work area.

You might wonder, “Why should I bother making my own paints?”

There are a number of reasons why it is beneficial for artists to make their own paints. For starters, when you break down a specific medium to its individual components, it helps you to understand the nature of the medium. Taking part in the process of creating an oil paint or a pastel stick provides invaluable insight into the qualities of that particular medium. Plus, the magic of watching loose powdered pigment transform into a usable paint can become part of the overall creative experience.

One of the best things about making your own paints is that you can control the hue, value and intensity of each color. If you need a specific shade of green that is difficult to mix using commercial paints, you can create your own. If you need a range of blues to create skyscapes and seascapes, you can create the exact colors that you need and save them for future use.

It’s easy to forget that there was once a time when all artists either had to make their own paints or purchase these supplies from a local artisan. The vast majority of artists today buy their paints and art materials off the shelf. Most artists don’t even think twice about how these materials are made or what is actually in them. This has changed our relationships to our art materials. By making your own paints, you can reinvigorate your connection to the materials that you use to create art.

In future articles, we’ll take a closer look at the process involved for making oil paints, pastels, watercolors and acrylics.

Segmation

FREE Newsletter

Join us on Facebook

SegPlay® Mobile iTunes now available for iPhone and iTouch

www.segmation.com