Category Archives: Art Education

Masaccio – Early Renaissance Painter

The number of years of a person’s life does not necessarily indicate the magnitude of the impact he or she will leave on society. Individuals like Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968), Princess Diana of Wales (1961-1997), and Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) are proof of this statement. Like these world-changers, Italian artist Masaccio (1401-1428) made a profound mark on history, despite the shortness of his life.

Masaccio was born on December 21, 1401, about 40 miles from Florence, Italy. Initially named Tommaso di Giovanni di Simone Cassai, the artist became known simply as “Masaccio” (translated as “Big Tom” or “Clumsy Tom”) because of his careless, heedless, amicable nature. (As a result of his artistic bent, Masaccio cared very little for his appearance or for the affairs of society.)

Giovanni, Masaccio’s brother, was also an artist. During the Renaissance, the skill of painting was usually passed down through a family’s paternal line. Considering the fact that Masaccio’s father, a notary, was not known to be artistic, it is a point of interest that both Masaccio and his brother were recognized artists. Some speculate that Masaccio’s paternal grandfather was responsible for teaching the young artist and his brother painting skills, as he was a chest maker whose craft involved painting. While it’s not certain, it is possible that Masaccio derived his natural talent and technical artistic skills from his grandfather.

Practically nothing is known about the first 21 years of Masaccio’s life. However, historians agree that he entered a painting guild at age 21. This indicates that he likely underwent a lengthy art apprenticeship sometime during the later time of his life. It was in this timeframe that his artwork began garnering attention and fame.

Masaccio managed to make an incredible impact on Italy, and on the art world, during the Quattrocento period of the Italian Renaissance. This era produced some of the most influential painters history recognizes; among them are Alberti, Donatello, and Brunelleschi. Masaccio is recognized at the Quattrocento period’s first great painter. It is amazing to consider that in “only six years, Masaccio radically transformed Florentine painting. His art eventually helped create many of the major conceptual and stylistic foundations of Western painting (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/367676/Masaccio).”

There are several distinct aspects of Masaccio’s work that set him apart as an influential artist during a time in which artists were plentiful. First, Masaccio’s use of linear perspective was novel when he began employing the technique. Also, a technique called “vanishing point” was first used by Masaccio. Finally, rather than imitate the ornate Gothic style of painting that was popular during his lifetime, Masaccio favored a more naturalistic look.

The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne (c. 1424) and San Giovenale Triptych (c. 1422) are two of Masaccio’s earliest known works. Amazingly, the latter piece of art was only recently (in 1961) discovered in Masaccio’s hometown. Unfortunately, age compromised some of the structural integrity of the piece. Still, art historians can clearly observe Masaccio’s use of the techniques mentioned above. “Masaccio’s concern to suggest three-dimensionality through volumetric figures and foreshortened forms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masaccio)” is also apparent in San Giovenale Triptych. Some of Masaccio’s other well-known pieces include his frescoes painted for the Branacci Chapel, The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, The Tribute Money, and The Pisa Altarpiece.

Renaissance artist Masaccio died in late 1428; he was only 26.

Those who die young, yet make an indelible, positive impression on their communities, are sometimes grieved for hundreds of years by people who derive inspiration and hope from the lives they lived. Masaccio is just one example of this type of influential person. It is unarguable that Masaccio made an incredible impact on the art world, despite his short life.

However, this post is meant to recognize his artist style and some major pieces. For those who want to read more of Masaccio‘s story, visit this link: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=ROM . Also, Segmation is proud to offer 21 digital Masaccio – Early Renaissance Painter patterns. By downloading these paint by numbers masterpieces, you can emulate one of the most fascinating artists who ever lived.

Enjoy the 21 Masaccio – Early Renaissance Painter painter patterns . Segmation has for you and continue to learn and celebrate the life of a great artist.

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

George Romney – Making Ideas Art

Franz Marc German Expressionist Painter

Jan Gossaert – A Great Flemish Painter of Antiquity”

Sources:

Masaccio

Masaccio – Britannica

Italian Art

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Melinda Donelan’s Blog Keeps Art Room Open 24/7

What does a Good Art Teacher Look LikeSummer vacation is here and classrooms across America are empty. We only know of one art room that is open all year long. The doors to Miss French Fry’s art room never close because she has mirrored the creativity her students experience in school with a bright, constructive and amusing blog, http://missfrenchfrymakesart.blogspot.com/.

“Teaching art is my dream job,” says Melinda Donelan (a.k.a. Miss French Fry). “I like to use my blog as an outlet for sharing some of the fun things we work on in the art room.” And share she does. About twice a week, Donelan publishes posts that show projects her students are working on as well as classroom décor/organization tips. Sometimes she even gives her readers a sneak peek into her personal life by revealing what she is making for dinner and her wardrobe selections for the week.

What sets this art teacher’s blog apart is her fusion of creativity and organization. Every post focused on art education starts by introducing the project and the inspiration behind it. Maybe she traveled to a museum or was inspired by a famous painter from the past. She explains how she does this intentionally, “When I develop lessons, regardless of what the objective is, I like to ensure that the projects tie in with something else, whether it’s a cross curricular connection or a piece of literature.” After tying each project to a deeper purpose, she springboards into the details of the project and shows her students bringing their artwork to life by using pictures. She has lots of pictures that show readers what the students are doing step-by-step. She also shows a finished project, too.

In reading her blog, it is clear that Miss French Fry really enjoys her job. “One of the biggest things I enjoy about teaching art is celebrating my students’ uniqueness,” she says. “Before teaching art, I worked as a special education teacher for students with behavioral and emotional disabilities. It’s been wonderful incorporating that background into my art room and definitely inspired quite a few blog posts.”

Miss French Fry Makes Art: Art Room Sub TubMiss French Fry’s blog posts can inspire more than just art teachers. All teachers could benefit from some of her posts. For example, the “Sub Tub” is an organizer she has created to store and label lesson plans for substitute teachers. All in all, her clever instructions make it simple for any teacher to feel prepared when they leave their classroom in the hands of a substitute.

In this 24/7 world, always accessible art education resources are hard to come by. With her blog, http://missfrenchfrymakesart.blogspot.com/, Melinda Donelan is changing this. Explore the adventurous, industrious and sometime wacky world of an art educator. Get some fresh ideas and walk away feeling encouraged and more creative.

 

Read more Segmation blog posts about colorful artists:

Is an art education necessary?

What does a Good Art Teacher Look Like?

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

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Liza Amor Shows Las Vegas What Happens in the Art Room

www.segmation.comLas Vegas is known to draw international tourists but has recently been drawing art enthusiasts as well. Art galleries throughout Sin City are reporting increased traffic and sales. The University of Las Vegas Art Galleries director Jerry Schefcik credits the creativity of hotel design for infusing art into Las Vegas culture, but the art featured in galleries goes far beyond casino kitsch. Schefcik says, “…the overall art scene in Vegas is growing because it attracts artists who think outside the box.”

One Las Vegas artist and art educator who fits this description is Liza Amor. She uses out of the box ideas to ensure her students’ artwork is seen and appreciated.

From a young age Liza was drawn to art. At four years old, drawing was one of her favorite pastimes. And as one of Liza’s favorite adages goes, “Practice makes perfect.” By the time she was looking to attend college, Liza had talent that could take her places. She was able to attend State University of New York at Buffalo.

While in college, Liza was greatly impacted by an after school art program she assisted with. Recognizing the importance of art education encouraged her career path and put her on a professional mission.

Today, Liza lives in Las Vegas and believes it is important for the community to see what happens in the art room. When people realize how valuable art education is, there is a higher chance (despite devastating budget cuts) art classes will remain in public schools.

To accomplish this, Liza partners with local galleries, like City of the World gallery, to see that her students’ artwork is showcased throughout Las Vegas. She also makes work available online through the virtual art gallery, Artsonia. This allows students to share their art with family members beyond Nevada’s borders.

art-classHer students are encouraged by having their art showcased. They are proud to post their work and appreciative to have such opportunities. “There is a big difference when you believe in them,” says Liza. When preparing them for their exhibits, she impresses the importance of this honor, telling them that they are representing themselves and their school.

After putting on annual art shows for her students, serving on the board of Art Educators of Nevada and displaying her own work throughout Las Vegas, Liza Amor was awarded National Art Education Association’s 2014 Nevada Art Educator of the Year. Beyond her talent and teaching skills, Liza is showing Las Vegas the value of art education. Right now she is on top of a cutting edge art scene and the world is beginning to take notice.

Read more Segmation blog posts about colorful artist:

Is an art education necessary?

What does a Good Art Teacher Look Like?

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

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Robert Henri – American Portrait Artist and Teacher

Tan Gam by Robert Henri

Tan Gam by Robert Henri

American artist Robert Henri had a mind of his own. Loyal to a fault and guided by his convictions, Henri was as great a leader as he was an artist. Throughout the course of his notable career, he defied traditional standards of art, pursing and promoting realism.

Robert Henri was born in Ohio and raised in Cozad, Nebraska. At that time this town bared his birth name: his father, John Cozad, founded the town when Robert was eight. Unfortunately, the entire family fled this area after an altercation resulted in John murdering a local rancher. Eventually they ended up – under the guise of alias names – on the east coast.

When the drama of childhood waned, Robert Henri completed his first painting. He was 18 years old. Enjoying the activity and appeased by his natural skill, Robert planned to attend Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1886. There, he came to appreciate the work of Thomas Eakins and the artist’s approach to realism. Henri continued to pursue his education by traveling to Paris where he attending Ecole des Beaux Arts. After his time there, he traveled Europe briefly before returning to Philadelphia where he began his career in art education.

Early in his career it became apparent that Henri was a born leader and a natural teacher too. It is said he inspired students by saying their art could be “a social force that creates a stir in the world”. Within a few years Henri was inspiring more than his students; he developed a following of aspiring artists as well.

During this time, Robert Henri was moving away from the impressionism that influenced his early work. He began moving towards realism, and encouraging other artists to do the same. This ignited a movement that urged American painters to pursue art with fresh perspective, making it okay for artists to express the world as they see it – not the idealized vision society wants see. The movement came to be known as the Ashcan School.

In 1898, Henri accepted a teaching position at the New York School of Art. Around this time, students, colleagues, and critics observed the passion he had for his craft. He was uninhibited by societal norms and blazed a trail for artists to express the realities of life.

Henri was admired and followed by many. In fact, he was elected to the National Academy of Design (a museum and school established to promote fine arts) for recognition of his artwork. Unfortunately, when the National Academy did not display the work of his colleagues at a show in 1907, Henri became disenchanted with the mainstream art world. He knew a bold move would be required to emphasize the importance of realism.

As a result, he set up an exhibition called “The Eight”. All featured work signified a break from traditional art perspectives of the time. In February 1908, five American artists put paintings on display at the Macbeth Gallery. Only once did they come together for this purpose; regardless, it left a lasting impression. It also propelled Henri to continue leading and promoting independent artists.

Robert Henri organized a number of art shows and exhibitions between 1910 and 1920. They included “Exhibition of Independent Artists”, jury-free exhibitions at the MacDowell Club, and the Armory Show. In addition, he continued his career as a teacher at the Art Students League between 1915 and 1927.

While Henri was a skilled artist, his natural gift as an influential teacher solidified his fame. He was effortlessly able to lead and organize people to pursue their passions. All the while, he prompted them to believe that art was a personal expression of a real world. In the book, The Art Spirit, one of Henri’s students compiled his works of art and detailed accounts of his thoughts on the subject.

When Robert Henri passed away in 1929, his influence lived on. In fact, it served as a bridge to usher in European modernism. More so, it inspired artists to reach levels of self-expression that had never been seen before. As an effect, realism came to life through the power of art.

The San Diego Museum of Art will be the first museum exhibition dedicated to the Spanish paintings of Robert Henri  from March 29, 2014 through September 09, 2014. Spanish Sojourns Robert Henri and the Spirit of Spain consists of over 40 major paintings borrowed from important museum and private collections around the country. More information can be found at:  http://www.sdmart.org/.

However, this post is meant to recognize his artist style and some major pieces. For those who want to read more of Robert Henri’s story, visit this link: http://www.segmation.com/products_pc_patternset_contents.asp?set=RHR. Also, Segmation is proud to offer 44 digital Robert Henri patterns. By downloading these paint by numbers masterpieces, you can emulate one of the most fascinating artists who ever lived.

Enjoy the 44 Robert Henri Patterns Segmation has for you and continue to learn and celebrate the life of a great artist.

Sources:

National Gallery of Art

Robert Henri Museum

Read more Segmation blog posts about other great artists:

William Glackens – American Realist Painter

Thomas Moran – American Landscape Painter

William Merritt Chase – American Impressionist Painter

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What do School Colors and Mascots Represent?

What do School Colors and Mascots RepresentPeople take a lot of pride in their schools. At every age, school colors and mascots unify centers of education. Most schools chose a combination of colors to represent the student body; this offers clear distinction from cross town rivals. To set themselves apart, schools get creative with who or what will represent them.

Student bodies are often the ones to come up with mascot characters. These representatives are picked with thoughtfulness, creativity, and some zany ideas. To exemplify this point, which will be expounded on later, envision a banana slug, an artichoke, and a holiday tree.

But how do these masterminds come up with the latest designs?  What makes a mascot significant?

Mascots embody characteristics and values of the entire school. They make a point and hold true to the cultural and historical significance of the education center. And it doesn’t hurt that mascots are entertaining too.

Mascots Make a Point

The spirit of a student body is electrifying. Mascots draw on this energy by representing collective beliefs. Two schools exemplify this:

  • UC Santa Cruz students were deliberate in their decisions to choose a banana slug for a mascot. They believe sports should be available to everyone, which is why one of the lowliest creatures represents them; Sammy the Banana Slug gets to be part of the fun too.
  • Scottsdale Community College has a fighting artichoke named Artie cheering them on. Sick of the amount of money sports takes from school budgets, students picked something that would represent their disinterest.

In both examples, students used art in the form of a school mascot to make their views evident.

Mascots Honor Cultural and Historic significance

Mascots stand – and often dance – for school ideals. Education institutions are foundational to communities. The citizens in surrounding areas often look to schools to honor the heritage of the town or city. This is why mascots often rally students together and stand as an expression of goodwill. They are a means to making students feel as though they belong to something bigger. Within the community, schools are a driving force in maintaining pride of involves everyone’s efforts.

Examples of mascots that represent community values include the University of Texas Longhorns, The University of Colorado Buffaloes, and more.

Years out of school, people rarely remember what final scores were for homecoming football games. But they always remember their school colors and mascots. Beyond this, people are drawn to these images for the rests of their lives. The entertainment it provides is great but the memories are far more than that: schools have characteristics that shape the identities of students and communities.

Image made available by KKfromBB on Flickr through Creative Common Licenses.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Education:

How to Encourage Creativity in Children

Inspiring Digital Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

Be a Artist in 2 minutes with Segmation SegPlay® PC (see more details here)

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Ideas for Creating Halloween Spirit


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Every October, as fallen leaves carpet the ground with brilliant shades of brown, yellow, red and orange, a variety of strange and spooky images start to appear creating Halloween Spirit. Ghosts and ghouls hang from trees, carved pumpkins and gnarled broomsticks appear on doorsteps, spiders weave webs across windows and gravestones turn up on front lawns.

Halloween art sets the stage for the scariest holiday of the year. Well before October 31 rolls around, you’ll want to get busy creating the seasonal decorations that will set the tone for the entire month.

The most common images in Halloween art include:

  • ghosts and haunted houses
  • witches, broomsticks and cauldrons
  • pumpkins and jack o’lanterns
  • spiders and cobwebs
  • monsters
  • werewolves
  • vampires and bats
  • skulls and skeletons
  • gravestones

Both adults and children alike enjoy creating Halloween arts and crafts that bring these strange and macabre images to life. Here are some hands-on ideas for Halloween arts and crafts:

  • Color in Halloween images with markers, crayons, paint, or even digitally using your computer
  • Cut outlines of spiders, bats, and witches’ hats out of black paper
  • Cut out body parts from magazines and paste them on thick paper to make your own monsters
  • Create your own gravestone using black marker on grey paper
  • Draw a pair of eyes and a wide, smiling mouth full of teeth on a pumpkin, and carve it out to create a jack o’lantern
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To get in the holiday spirit, hang your 2-D Halloween arts and crafts in your front windows or on your front door. Place your 3-D Halloween art projects on your doorstep or front lawn.
The most exciting form of “Halloween art” is your costume!

Whether you are a 7 years old or 77 years old, on October 31 you can transform yourself into someone (or something) else. This is where your imagination has free reign – you can change your appearance however you want by wearing a costume, a wig, and/or make-up. Whether you are the one trick-or-treating or the one answering the door with a bowl of candy, Halloween is a holiday full of surprises, where nothing is quite what it seems.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art:

Art Therapy Treats more than the Heart

How to turn your Passion into Profit

Art Beneath Your Feet

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Creative Connections Strengthen Schools

ImageThere is no secret about it: art makes for an exciting learning environment. Art projects are the first introduction to education for young children. Now, with advancements in art education and the creativity of culture, schools are finding additional benefits to these activities. Art serves as a connector that unifies students and strengthens schools.

Even though art programs have been cut in recent years, teachers and administrators are using classrooms as catalysts for creativity. One example of this is how teachers use hands-on projects to promote learning traditional subject matters. In addition, entire schools are coming together to celebrate the artwork of these non-traditional settings.

As a result, art is becoming the ultimate educator. Even without art classes and proper funding, faculties are using creativity to excite students and promote learning.

Teachers Take Charge of Creativity in the Classroom

More than ever, teachers are picking up the slack for consequences of limited funding. Many educators can be found encouraging students to showcase creativity in the classroom. Using art to inform students about other subject areas is proving to be effective and productive. In the end, students learn in memorable ways and create something they are proud to show off. They are expressing their education, making classroom walls the new chalkboards.

Schools Connect Students in Creative Ways

Administrators are encouraging teachers to make art a part of learning. They are celebrating this by coming up with creative ways to showcase art in every classroom. Some are using murals to display art from all students. This encourages community involvement; different age groups learn to appreciate the artwork of other students, both younger and older. More so, collecting all artwork allows students and teachers to feel invested in schoolwide projects. Likewise, it provides a great backdrop for the learning environment.

Art is a powerful tool for education. It can enhance the atmosphere of learning in any school. When teachers and administrators partner together, they can overcome obstacles of inadequate funding that impacts art education. This unifies a school and inspires student communities.

Read more Segmation blog posts about Art Education:

How to Encourage Creativity in Children

Inspiring Digital Art

Reviving Art as the Heart of Education

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