Category Archives: art car

What Does Your Car’s Color Say About You?

What Does Your Car’s Color Say About YouFor starters, there is a strong possibility that your favorite car color gives away your gender.

A new report from iSeeCars.com reveals that men and women prefer different color cars.

Can you believe that men are more likely to search for red, orange, black, white, green and gray cars while woman opt for silver, brown, gold, beige, blue and yellow vehicles?

Men and Women Prefer Different Color Cars

According to the search and compare car website, these trends were exposed after studying search inquiries over a 12 month timespan. The site reports “hundreds of thousands of consumers” consult iSeeCars.com for information about new and used cars, but did not include the exact number of men and women who participated in this study.

Nevertheless, the statistics are compelling. Here is the list of male preferred vehicle colors and the likeliness of men searching for these cars over women:

  • MEN are 3 percent more likely to search for RED cars
  • MEN are 8 percent more likely to search for ORANGE cars
  • MEN are 6 percent more likely to search for BLACK cars
  • MEN are 0 percent more likely to search for WHITE cars
  • MEN are 8 percent more likely to search for GREEN cars
  • MEN are 0 percent more likely to search for GRAY cars

Women, on the other hand, seem to prefer completely different car colors.

  • WOMEN are 2 percent more likely to search for SILVER cars
  • WOMEN are 1 percent more likely to search for BROWN cars
  • WOMEN are 3 percent more likely to search for GOLD cars
  • WOMEN are 7 percent more likely to search for BEIGE cars
  • WOMEN are 6 percent more likely to search for BLUE cars
  • WOMEN are 2 percent more likely to search for YELLOW cars

Why Do Men and Women Prefer Different Car Colors?

What Does Your Car’s Color Say About YouiSeeCars.com has some hypotheses about why, according to this report, men and women prefer different color cars. For instance, red, black and orange are popular colors for sports cars. All the while, white is the most popular shade for pickup trucks.

Similarly, silver, brown, gold and beige are often seen on minivans, sedans and station wagons – if at all. In the report, iSeeCars.com states that “Brown and gold/beige are not common car colors – only making up about 4 percent of the 30 million used car listings.” And even though women prefer blue cars 3.6 percent more than men, the most popular blue car is a minivan.

Therefore, it appears men are looking for sports cars and pickup trucks while women search for dependable family vehicles.

Further research could be done on this subject, but for now, it is interesting to read what one search and compare car website found when designating searches by gender. More so, it brings up an age-old question: “what does your car say about you?”

Read more Segmation blog posts about color theory:

Wacky and Wonderful Art Cars www.segmation.com

Vehicle Safety and Car Color

Why Are School Buses Yellow?

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The Color Popularity Contest: Cars, Weddings, Sports Teams, and Much More

We all know that colors can conjure up various meanings and sometimes even feelings. The color red can convey power, passion, or caution. Blues and greens can evoke feelings of peace and tranquility. But what are the most popular colors out there?

The multimedia resource center for DuPont recently released the 2011 Global Automotive Color popularity report. This report made us curious to know what the popular color choices are, not only for cars, but for other material things like clothing, home decor, sports teams, and weddings.

According to DuPont’s Global Color Popularity Report, the most popular car colors in 2011 were white, solid, pearl, silver, and black. This is the first time in quite a while that whites have surpassed black and grey in popularity. The colors green and yellow came in last, leaving red, blue, and brown to fall somewhere in the middle.

In North America, white, black, and silver still ranked highest on the list for popular car colors. Green, yellow, and brown came in last, while grey, red, and blue took the middle ground. To view the report yourself and discover which colors were the most popular in numerous countries, visit the website below.

http://www2.dupont.com/Media_Center/en_US/color_popularity/

Color popularity can depend on many factors including seasons, fashions, and purpose. The popularity of a color is always subject to change as new styles, needs, and combinations come to the surface. It is also incredibly hard to determine the most popular color in many situations.

General surveys have revealed that blue is usually the most popular color overall. However, green has been a favored decorating color.

When it comes to sports teams, each team typically claims at least two primary (bold) colors. At the moment, the most popular color scheme for sports teams is red and black.

Popular fashion colors can change by the year or even by the season. Popular shoe colors are generally red, black, and silver. However, discerning popular hair colors is a bit trickier. Usually when we talk about hair color we are referring more to hues and shades than we are to actual colors. For those worried about fitting in to current fashion, platinum blonde is still “in,” as is blonde.

Popular wedding color combinations are also difficult to keep up with, but black and white seem to stay consistently popular. This year you may just be seeing a lot of neutral colors paired with small amounts of bright, eye-popping color.

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Car colors: An Artistic Expression?

Do you notice art everywhere you look? Perhaps an interesting spiral staircase catches your attention. Or the simple beauty of a skyline. How about a piece of intricate architecture?

For those of us who are artistically minded, art always seems to find a way of manifesting itself into our daily lives.

But have you ever thought the color of your car could have just as much expression and thought put into it?

If you haven’t… think again! DuPont recently held their 2011 Annual Trend Show, this year dubbed “A Sense of Color.” The show aims itself at describing some of the emotions and dynamics behind color choices and how they represent individuals and groups in thought provoking new ways.

Color science and color theory are complex areas of study, revealing much about how we humans respond to color and its infinite implications. Clearly, research suggests entire books can be (and have been) written on the subject, making it a bit too lengthy for us to dive into at this moment! However, what we’re interested in today is DuPont’s use of categories to segment their ideas to best target their individual audiences.

Their first category was entitled “Déjà vu” – these colors were designed with DuPont members in mind. Colors were crafted around attaining a sense of heritage, strength, comfort, and thoughtfulness. They employed rich greens and reds named “Flashback” and “Green Velvet”, while another category “Sound of Silence” utilized a quiet and muted color spectrum, featuring colors that radiate a sense of calmness like soft hues named “Minor Gamut” and “Speechless” for their earthy tones.

The next category, “Touch of Blue” developed emotional aspects of color relating to our environment. Utilizing rich blues as well as dramatic light chrome and metallic hues, colors like “Tactile Teal” and “Tickled Blue” reveal a sense of environmental awareness. This group of colors is expected to increase in popularity as focus on maintaining our planet becomes more globally known.

The final category “Matter of Taste” created a color palette to spotlight international inspirations. Caramel, tangerine, greens, purples, and pinks made up some of the more pronounced colors found in this segment. These colors, considered a bit more radical, are aimed at the individual tastes of more eclectic (or eccentric!) buyers.

It’s clear that a lot of thought goes into the development of what colors your car is available in. So with a little shopping, it is easy to see you may very well be on your way to finding the color that best represents a small (and beautiful) piece of you and your artistic mind!

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The Art of Tibetan Sand Painting

Can you imagine spending several hours, days, or even weeks on a work of art, and then destroying it? The idea of creating something only to wipe it out when you’re finished is illogical and counterproductive to many people in the Western world. But in some cultures, this is a common procedure, and one that serves a deeper purpose than meets the eye.

Sand painting is the perfect example of ephemeral art – that is, art that is meant to be temporary. To create a sand painting, colored sand is poured carefully into predetermined patterns. Sand painting is a common practice amongst many diverse indigenous cultures from around the world, including the Australian Aborigines, the Native Americans, and the Tibetans, as shown above.

Tibetan sand painting is a perfect example of making art that values “process” over “product”. In the Western world, it’s often the opposite – artists labor over paintings for the purpose of selling them for profit. The art, even though it may be a labor of love, is also a “product”. The “process” of making art is treated as a means to an end.

In Tibetan sand painting, the process of creating the intricate sand mandalas is far more important than the final product. Tibetan sand paintings are created by Buddhist monks for ritual purposes related to healing and blessing. As the sand mandalas are painstakingly created, viewers are often allowed to watch and admire the precision of the artists and the beauty of the design.

Destroying the finished sand mandalas contains a ritual purpose as well; it is a lesson on impermanence. Perhaps artists from Western cultures can benefit from some of these ideas by paying closer attention to the process of making art, rather than worrying about how the final product will turn out.

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On Cloud Nine www.segmation.com

Pattern Set for SegPlay® PC released (see more details here)

Clouds are visible masses of water droplets which are suspended over in the Earth’s atmosphere. Clouds are classified in various groups depending on their altitude, structural appearance, and coloration. Cirrocumulus, Cirrostratus, Altocumulus, Altostratus, Stratocumulus, Stratus, Cumulus, Nimbostratus, Cumulonimbus, and Cumulus are the most common names given. Their coloration gives clues onto what they contain due to light scattering effects of water drops and ice crystals and the direction of the light hitting the clouds. Our set of cloud patterns will put you on Cloud Nine. We have many representations of clouds of various types photographed against cactuses, birds, bridges, shades, water, and grass fields. Several of the patterns are based on clouds images which have been artistically enhanced to give them a different yet, fun, and colorful appearance.

This set contains 23 paintable patterns.

On Cloud Nine

Have fun and relax with beautiful online painting art. So fun and easy to use with no mess but just a mouse!

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How Color Can Transform Space www.segmation.com

Street Painting in Washington, DC

Look around you. The buildings, the streets, the trees – they all look pretty much the same, day after day, don’t they? So much so, that you probably got to the point where you don’t really notice your surroundings anymore, other than to get from Point A to Point B, or to admire an occasional flower or sunset.

What would happen if someone painted multicolored stripes across the street you take every day to work? Imagine how much that would change your perception of the street and alter your day to day reality. Color has the power to lift you into another world, and take you beyond the ordinary. Many artists are utilizing this power to transform our everyday surroundings so that we see our own familiar spaces in a new light.

Here are three examples of how color can transform space:

  • In the image above, artist Mokha Laget, in conjuction with the Corcoran and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, recreated a striped street painting that she originally created 20 years earlier on 8th St. NW in downtown Washington DC. The painted stripes are an homage to former Corcoran professor and noted color field artist, Gene Davis, who died of a heart attack in 1985. The bright colors enliven the street, bringing a sense of wonder and whimsicality to the US capital.
  • Rio de Janeiro, capital of Brazil, is a city with striking disparities between the rich and the poor. Twenty percent of Rio’s inhabitants live in densely populated favelas that crowd the hillsides overlooking the capital’s more wealthy residents. The ‘O Morro’ Favela Painting project is an attempt to bring color and culture to the impoverished community, injecting vitality and pride into an otherwise depressed area rife with social issues. The Favela Project is employing favela residents to paint their houses in specific, carefully-designed patterns that when finished, will be a display of beauty and color visible from the center of Rio.
  • Christo and Jeanne-Claude, famous for “wrapping” buildings, bridges and entire islands, once again soared into the spotlight in 2005 with their “Gates” installation in New York City’s Central Park. For 15 days in February 2005, 7,503 vinyl saffron-colored gates rising 5 meters into the air were displayed along Central Park’s pathways, stretching a combined length of 23 miles. Although the public had mixed feelings about the installation, the gates undeniably brought color to New York’s austere winter landscape.

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All About Yellow Pigments www.segmation.com

Yellow is one of the three primary colors, which means it is often used in painting – from capturing the warm rays of a golden sun, to a field full of sunflowers, to the flickering flames of fire. Here is an overview of some of the most common yellow pigments you’ll use when painting:

Yellow Ochre (sometimes called Mars Yellow) is a non-toxic natural clay pigment. In fact, it is one of the oldest pigments in the world, used by our prehistoric ancestors. Yellow Ochre has a tan, sandy appearance.

Naples Yellow was once made from toxic synthetic pigments that were used abundantly by the Old Masters, but today’s version is made from modern, non-toxic substances. Naples Yellow usually has a light, pale appearance.

Cadmium Yellow is another historically toxic pigment (Cadmium Sulfide) that was used by artists in the late 19th century. It now contains a non-toxic replacement (usually Azo pigments), but is still called Cadmium Yellow. Cadmium Yellow has a very bright yellow appearance.

Azo Yellow (also called Hansa Yellow) is a dye-based synthetic pigment invented in the early 20th century. Azo Yellow is usually bright but it is also pale and translucent compared to Cadmium Yellow.

Each of these yellow pigments adds something different to your palette. If you are painting a still life, landscape or portrait that requires the use of yellow, consider the different properties of these yellows to decide which one (or more) would work best for what you need.

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